Comparison-Contrast Literary Essay

57 %
43 %
Information about Comparison-Contrast Literary Essay
Education

Published on September 8, 2008

Author: SWVega

Source: authorstream.com

Compare & Contrast Essay : Compare & Contrast Essay Using the Block Method to Explore Theme in Longfellow’s “A Psalm of Life” and Hughes’ “Let American Be America Again” Block MethodSimilarities & Differences : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Block MethodSimilarities & Differences Introductory Paragraph : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Introductory Paragraph Introduces authors and their works Provides essential background about the authors if appropriate Introduces the point/s that will be compared Introduces the point/s that will be contrasted Sample Introduction : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Sample Introduction The American Dream is the focus of both Langston Hughes’ “Let America be America Again” and Henry W. Longfellow’s “A Psalm of Life.” Both poets emphasize the importance for all Americans to reach the American Dream; however, the poets disagree on the attainability of the dream by all Americans. Block FormatComparison Paragraph: Similarity : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Block FormatComparison Paragraph: Similarity TS: Both poets believe that the American Dream is worth the challenges it poses. Evidence: Longfellow Proof: “Lives of great men all remind us / We can make our lives sublime, / and departing leave behind us / footprints in the sands of time;” (commentary) Proof: “Let us, then, be up and doing / with a heart for any fate; / still achieving, still pursuing / learn to labor and to wait.” (commentary) Block FormatComparison Paragraph Cont’d : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Block FormatComparison Paragraph Cont’d Evidence (cont’d): Hughes Proof: “Let America be America again. / Let it be the dream it used to be. / Let it be the pioneer on the plain / Seeking a home where he himself is free.” (commentary) Proof: “O, let my land be a land where Liberty / Is crowned with no false patriotic wreath, / But opportunity is real, and life is free, / Equality is in the air we breathe.” (commentary) Sample Paragraph: SimilarityColor Key: Black = topic sentence; Blue = Student’s analysis/commentary; Red = quoted material from the poems; Green = transitions : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Sample Paragraph: SimilarityColor Key: Black = topic sentence; Blue = Student’s analysis/commentary; Red = quoted material from the poems; Green = transitions Both poets believe that the American Dream is worth the challenges it poses. Longfellow promises great rewards for those who set and pursue admirable goals. He states, “Lives of great men all remind us / We can make our lives sublime, / and departing leave behind us / footprints in the sands of time;” This line reminds us that our forefathers accomplished great things. After all, had it not been for men like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, Americans would still be subjects of the English crown. Longfellow cautions, though, that dreaming takes work and patience. He warns that we must “learn to labor and to wait.” Similarly, Hughes yearns for the days when the American Dream was “fresh” and “new.” He writes, “Let America be America again. / Let it be the dream it used to be. / Let it be the pioneer on the plain / Seeking a home where he himself is free.” Hughes’ reference to the “pioneer on the plain” evokes the lightness and happiness that people experience when they are free and independent in a world filled with opportunity. The pioneers, usually poor and equipped with nothing more than hope, independence, and stubbornness, symbolize the spirit of the American Dream. Block FormatContrast Paragraph: Difference : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Block FormatContrast Paragraph: Difference TS: Although both poets admire the American Dream, their experiences pursuing the dream differ greatly. Evidence:Longfellow Proof: “Not enjoyment, and not sorrow, / is our destined end or way; / But to act, that each to-morrow / Find us farther than today.” (commentary) Block FormatContrast Paragraph Cont’d : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Block FormatContrast Paragraph Cont’d Evidence (cont’d):Hughes Proof: “O, let my land be a land where Liberty / Is crowned with no false patriotic wreath, / But opportunity is real, and life is free, / Equality is in the air we breathe.” (commentary) Proof: “Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed --” (commentary) Proof: “O, let America be America again -- / The land that never has been yet -- / And yet must be -- the land where every man is free.” (commentary) Sample Paragraph: DifferenceColor Key: Black = topic sentence; Blue = Student’s analysis/commentary; Red = quoted material from the poems; Green = transitions : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Sample Paragraph: DifferenceColor Key: Black = topic sentence; Blue = Student’s analysis/commentary; Red = quoted material from the poems; Green = transitions Although both poets admire the American Dream, they hold vastly different views on the attainability and fairness of the American Dream. Longfellow, for instance, encourages readers “to act that each to-morrow / Find us farther than today.” This advice suggests that as long as we plan and work diligently, we can improve our lots in life. To Longfellow, achieving the American Dream is as simple as remaining hopeful, sending one’s children to school and showing up for work everyday. Unlike the optimistic Longfellow, however, Hughes points out that under the current social system, only a privileged few can ever achieve their dreams. Instead, Hughes reminds us that without freedom, people can work hard all of their lives and achieve nothing: “For all the dreams we’ve dreamed / And all the songs we’ve sung / And all the hopes we’ve hung, / The millions who have nothing for our pay -- Except the dream that’s almost dead today.” Of course, Hughes is talking about the disenfranchised and oppressed Americans whom the American system of “dog eat dog” has exploited and deserted. Throughout the poem, Hughes mentions the “poor white,” the “negro,” “Indian[s],” and European immigrants who suffer exploitation by the powerful and greedy. Unlike Longfellow’s celebration of all that is possible, Hughes’ poem calls for the reclamation of the dream that has gone afoul. Transition words/phrases to show Similarities: : September 2008 David_vega@swsd.k12.pa.us Transition words/phrases to show Similarities: like similar as same in the same way too both most important have in common the same as similarly as well as Transition words/phrases to show Differences: although yet whereas however but while differ instead unless unlike on the contrary contrary to even though on the other hand the reverse

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Word Choice Point of View Essay Theme - scs workshops

STUDENT SAMPLE Ella Berven October 15, 2011 Period 4 Literary Comparison/Contrast Essay Shades of Being Human Alice Walker and Maya Angelou are two ...
Read more

Comparing and Contrasting - The Writing Center

This handout will help you first to determine whether a particular assignment is asking for comparison/contrast and ... comparison/contrast essay, ...
Read more

Writing a Compare/Contrast Essay - sbcc.edu

Writing a Compare/Contrast Essay As always, the instructor and the assignment sheet provide the definitive expectations and requirements for any essay.
Read more

How to Write a Compare and Contrast Essay (with Pictures)

The purpose of a compare and contrast essay is to analyze the differences and/or the similarities of two distinct subjects.
Read more

Compare and Contrast Essay Examples | AcademicHelp.net

Compare and Contrast Essay Samples. This type of essay can be really confusing, as balancing between comparing and contrasting can be rather difficult.
Read more

Literature Compare and Contrast - Literary Devices Essay ...

Literature: Compare and Contrast Literary Devices Kathy J. Shannon University of Phoenix Mickeal M. Donald, Instructor September 3, 2010 Compare and Contrast
Read more

The Literary Comparison Contrast Essay - scribd.com

The Literary. Point of View Essay Theme Word Choice Literary Devices Author Comparison/Contrast: Comparison/Contrast - The process of examining two or more ...
Read more

Comparison/Contrast Essay Introduction Sample

Comparison/Contrast Essay Introduction Sample Broad intro statement. Brief explanation of the points that the next work conveys. A comparison of
Read more

Comparison And Contrast Literary Essay - 3hibino.co.jp

Comparison And Contrast Literary Essay. School Uniform Pros Essay, essay about science in our daily life.
Read more

Sample Topics for Comparison & Contrast Essays

To be effective, a comparison-contrast essay needs to be focused on particular methods, characters, and themes. These ten sample topics demonstrate ...
Read more