Commonly Confused Words

43 %
57 %
Information about Commonly Confused Words
Education
lot

Published on August 17, 2009

Author: kfasimpaur

Source: slideshare.net

Commonly Confused Words Part 1

A lot A lot is 2 words not one alot

A lot

A lot is 2 words not one

its, it’s Its shows possession or ownership. It’s is a contraction of “it is.” it’s = it is The dog ate its food. It’s a great day. .

its, it’s

Its shows possession or ownership.

It’s is a contraction of “it is.”

there, they’re, their There is the place. They’re is a contraction of “they are.” Their shows ownership (belonging to someone). I am going there . They’re my friends. Their books are on the table.

there, they’re, their

There is the place.

They’re is a contraction of “they are.”

Their shows ownership (belonging to someone).

two, to, too Two is the number 2. To is a preposition. Too means also or in addition. I have two feet . I’m going to school. I like pizza too .

two, to, too

Two is the number 2.

To is a preposition.

Too means also or in addition.

I I must always be capitalized. i

I

I must always be capitalized.

are, our Are is a verb. Our shows ownership (belonging to us). Our house is blue. We are going.

are, our

Are is a verb.

Our shows ownership (belonging to us).

where, were Where is a place. Were is a verb. Where is the game? We were playing basketball.

where, were

Where is a place.

Were is a verb.

principal, principle Princi pal is the main person or main thing. (The princi pal is your pal .) A princip le is a ru le . I’m the principal . Fairness is an important principle .

principal, principle

Princi pal is the main person or main thing. (The princi pal is your pal .)

A princip le is a ru le .

no, know No is the opposite of yes. Know means to have information. No ! Don’t go there. I know how to skateboard.

no, know

No is the opposite of yes.

Know means to have information.

new, knew New is the opposite of old. Knew is the past tense of to know. I’m new at this school. I knew where to go. Art used with permission from ClipArt.com

new, knew

New is the opposite of old.

Knew is the past tense of to know.

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Commonly confused words - Oxford Dictionaries

Commonly confused words - Language reference content from Oxford. Help with language usage, grammar questions, punctuation, spelling, and language learning.
Read more

Writer's Web: Commonly Confused Words - University of Richmond

Commonly Confused Words (printable version here) Words that sound alike or nearly alike but have different meanings often cause writers trouble.
Read more

Words Commonly Confused - Santa Monica College- Faculty ...

Words Commonly Confused . by V. Bell, J. Cheney, P. J. King & M. P. Moore Click on the words that you ...
Read more

COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS - St. Louis Community College

dairy place where milk products are processed diary personal journal descent downward movement dissent disagreement dessert final, sweet course in a meal
Read more

List of Commonly Confused Words in English Grammar

List of most commonly confused words in the English language. Know the rules of standard English Grammar. Online dictionary. Easy to use and understand.
Read more

Glossary of Usage: Index of Commonly Confused Words

In our Glossary of Usage you'll find more than 300 sets of commonly confused words--with links to definitions, examples, usage notes, and exercises.
Read more

Word List of Commonly Confused Words at Dictionary.com

Understand the differences between words with similar sounds, spellings, and meanings
Read more

Commonly Confused Words: Part Two - Voice of America ...

This week, we continue explaining commonly confused words in the English language. Today we look at the words lay/lie, affect/effect, and than/then.
Read more

Fun With Words: Commonly Confused Words

Abjure and Adjure. Abjure means to "renounce" or "repudiate." Adjure means "request earnestly." The words have little in common other than their rarity and ...
Read more

Flaunt/Flout - Do These Words Stump You Too? | Merriam-Webster

Question: If you treat convention with disdain, are you flouting or flaunting the rules? Answer: flouting. How to Remember It: Think of whistling – or ...
Read more