COIL406323

71 %
29 %
Information about COIL406323
Education

Published on January 10, 2008

Author: Desiderio

Source: authorstream.com

Proving and Improving: Purposeful Themed Learning Communities Assessment :  Proving and Improving: Purposeful Themed Learning Communities Assessment International Conference on The First-Year Experience Lauren Chism, Associate Director, Center on Integrating Learning and Coordinator of Themed Learning Communities Michele J. Hansen, Ph.D., Director of Assessment, University College July 11, 2007 - Hawaii’s Big Island, Hawaii IUPUI Context :  IUPUI Context Large urban, commuter, public university. 76% commute to campus. Large number of under-prepared fist-year students (33% are admitted conditionally). 59% of fall first-year students are first-generation college students (neither parent completed a four year college degree). 30% of first-time, full-time students report that they plan to work more than 20 hours per week while attending school Learning Communities at Your Institutions:  Learning Communities at Your Institutions How many of you are coming from institutions with learning communities? What is a “learning community” at your institution? Some types of learning communities: Residential programs Freshman seminar courses Linked courses or course clusters Team-taught coordinated study programs Any combination of these and more! What is a Themed Learning Community (TLC)?:  What is a Themed Learning Community (TLC)? 3 or more linked courses including an integrative first year seminar connected through an interdisciplinary theme. First year seminar is taught by an instructional team including a faculty member, academic advisor, librarian and student mentor Faculty and instructional team members work together to integrate the curricula Involve exciting opportunities for experiential learning (co-curricular/service learning experiences) Examples of TLCs:  Examples of TLCs Examples of Themed Learning Communities: For Love AND Money (English, Psychology, Math & Career Exploration Seminar) Urban Community Past and Present (Education, History, English & First Year Seminar) Can’t We All Just Get Along? (Anthropology, Psychology, English and First Year Seminar) Complete listings and descriptions: http://opd.iupui.edu/Units/COIL/tlcoverview.asp Examples of Experiential Learning: Athletic TLC students visit NCAA headquarters Education TLC students tutor children in the community Multicultural Perspectives TLC students attend a Ramadan celebration Evolution of Learning Communities:  Evolution of Learning Communities 1995  Learning communities begin at IUPUI LCs are first year seminar courses often paired with another introductory course using an instructional team model 2001  After an external team of reviewers encouraged IUPUI to extend learning communities beyond linking two courses, block scheduling piloted in 2001. 2002-2003 The University College Schedule Block Committee/National Learning Communities institute team strongly recommended the move to Themed Learning Communities in 2002. 2003-Present 7 TLCs in 2003; 27 TLCs scheduled for 2007 Goals:  Goals TLC Goals for IUPUI To increase retention rate for first-term students To improve TLC participants’ GPA To improve TLC participants’ satisfaction with IUPUI To improve TLC participants’ graduation rates TLC Goals for Students To form learning support networks among students in their community To enhance student contact with a network of faculty and staff To promote collaborative and active learning To understand the value of diversity by exposure to multiple points of view To apply classroom learning to the real world To understand the relationship between academic learning and co-curricular activities To provide opportunities to integrate learning across academic and professional disciplines that will enable students to understand their learning in coherent, comprehensive ways The Plenary:  The Plenary “Interdisciplinary, integrated core curriculum emphasizing links across courses and ideas” P. Terenzini International FYE Conference Big Island, Hawaii 7/9/07 Why Assess Learning Communities? :  Why Assess Learning Communities? Demonstrate Worth and Value Learn about Impacts and Goal Achievement Course Development and Improvement Obtain Student Feedback Characteristics of Fall 2005 TLC Cohort :  Characteristics of Fall 2005 TLC Cohort 391 Students Participated 74% Women 12% African American 63% First-Generation College Student 35% Admitted Conditionally 967 Average SAT Score 62% Average High School Percentile Rank 25% Campus Housing 25% Summer Bridge Participants 18-19 Primary Ages. Average=18.63 Characteristics of Fall 2006 TLC Cohort :  Characteristics of Fall 2006 TLC Cohort 377 Students Participated 74% Women 8% African American 68% First-Generation College Student 26% Admitted Conditionally 990 Average SAT Score 67% Average High School Percentile Rank 27% Campus Housing 28% Summer Bridge Participants 18-19 Primary Ages. Average=18.96 Assessment Methods:  Assessment Methods Comparative G.P.A and Retention Comparative NSSE Data Student Feedback Questionnaire Satisfaction Self-Reported Learning Gains Quantitative & Qualitative Items Other Assessment Methods: Faculty & Student Focus Groups Assessment conducted within TLCs How Can We Produce Appropriate Comparisons? :  How Can We Produce Appropriate Comparisons? Barriers: Random assignment is simply not possible or ethical. The vast majority of incoming students participate in a freshman seminar with a history of increased retention. There are potential disparities in students’ previous academic achievement and other predictors of success. It is important to control for background characteristics, academic preparation, & other program participation. First Semester G.P.A.*:  First Semester G.P.A.* *Comparison group – students who participated in a freshman seminar or learning community. *G.P.A. adjusted to control for significant covariates including: course load, age, gender, ethnicity, SAT scores, high school percentile ranks, units of high school math, and summer bridge participation. **p<.01 Retention:  Retention Fall 2003 Adjusted One Year Retention   # of Students Adjusted Retention Rate* TLC Participants 121 76% Non-TLC Participants 1164 69%     Fall 2004 Adjusted One Year Retention   # of Students Adjusted Retention Rate* TLC Participants 287 69% Non-TLC Participants 1351 68% Fall 2005 Adjusted One Year Retention   # of Students Adjusted Retention Rate* TLC Participants 338 70%** Non-TLC Participants 1211 65%**       *Adjusted controlling for differences in demographics, enrollment, academic preparation, summer bridge participation. The non-participant group includes students enrolled in First-Year Seminars, but not in TLCs **. p<.10 A Combination of Interventions:  A Combination of Interventions Summer Bridge Academy Service Learning First Year Seminar TLCs About ½ of TLC students participated in Service Learning 54% in 2005; 44% in 2006 Approximately ¼ of TLC students participated in the Summer Bridge Academy 25% in 2005; 28% in 2006 In 2005, participation in the Summer Bridge Academy and/or Service Learning appeared to significantly increase TLC students GPA. Bridge appeared to have a significant impact on retention. N Adjusted GPA Adjusted First Year Retention Bridge +TLC 97 3.00 83% TLC 294 2.60 67% Service Learning +TLC 212 2.82 73% TLC 179 2.57 69% In 2006, there was no significant difference for either. 2006 Student Feedback Questionnaire (N=320) Top ranked by mean rating (% Very Much and Much):  2006 Student Feedback Questionnaire (N=320) Top ranked by mean rating (% Very Much and Much) Formed friendships that will maintain after the semester (79%). Exchanged ideas with students with different views (61%). Became more effective in communicating my thoughts in writing (57%). Understood connections between different disciplines/courses (61%). Developed a better understanding of complex real world social problems and issues (60%). Actively discussed complex issues and ideas (59%). Discussed ideas with peers outside of class (52%). Overall how satisfied were you with your TLC experience? Mean = 4.03 81% satisfied/very satisfied; 5% dissatisfied, very dissatisfied) Qualitative Survey Items:  Qualitative Survey Items Please describe how the theme of your learning community contributed to your learning: Knowledge of Career/Major/Career Exploration Process (25%) Cohort/Support Network (18%) Connections/Integrative Curricula (15%) Please describe what you liked most about your Themed Learning Community experience: Cohort/Support Network (45%) Professors (14%) Interdisciplinary Connections (10%) Please describe what you liked least about your Themed Learning Community experience: Nothing (15%) Lack of Interdisciplinary Connections/Coordination (12%) Assignments (12%) National Survey of Student Engagement:  National Survey of Student Engagement Significant differences between TLC students (80) in comparison to others (280): Students participating in TLCs more often: Worked on a paper or project that required integrating ideas or information from various sourcesmade more class presentations Included diverse perspectives (different races, religions, genders, political beliefs, etc.) in class discussions or writing assignments Put together ideas or concepts from different courses when completing assignments or during class discussions Worked harder than thought they could to meet an instructor's standards or expectations Tried to better understand someone else's views by imagining how an issue looks from his or her perspective Learned something that changed the way you understand an issue or concept TLC students also reported more instituional emphasis on: Providing the support needed to help students succeed academically Encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds Helping students cope with non-academic responsibilities (work, family, etc.) Working effectively with others Understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds Assessment Conducted Within TLCs:  Assessment Conducted Within TLCs TLC entitled: “For Love and Money” First-Year Seminar, Psychology, English, and Math TLC designed to help students learn more about who they are and what majors and careers would help them reach meaningful life goals and pursue their passions. Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale - Short Form (Betz and Taylor, 2001) Composed of Sub-Scales Employed a Pre-Post Design with a Control Group (a non-TLC First-Year Seminar Course) TLC Career Decision Making Self-Efficacy (n=17) :  TLC Career Decision Making Self-Efficacy (n=17) Non-TLC Career Decision Making Self-Efficacy (n=19) :  Non-TLC Career Decision Making Self-Efficacy (n=19) Dissemination of Data:  Dissemination of Data Discussed at annual retreats and faculty development workshops Included in TLC brochures and faculty handbooks Presented annually to academic advisors Presented at New Faculty Orientation Disseminated to any deans, administrators, faculty, staff or students interested in the program. Lessons Learned from Assessment :  Lessons Learned from Assessment Themed Learning Communities seem to provide opportunities for student connections. Students establish friendships by participating. Students able to integrate learning between courses and disciplines. Important to create structures and procedures that allow faculty to collaborate and engage in interdisciplinary pedagogies. Early findings suggest positive impacts on academic success and retention. Will to continue monitor impacts… Work Undone and Remaining Challenges in Themed Learning Community Assessment :  Work Undone and Remaining Challenges in Themed Learning Community Assessment What are the impacts of discrete components or intervening variables that impact LC success (e.g., co-curricular activities, service learning, integration of learning, writing across the curriculum, establishing connections with other students, civic engagement, etc.) What structures can implemented to facilitate faculty interaction and collaboration? How can faculty effectively integrate themes and still cover discipline course content? Slide26:  Questions & Sharing of Assessment Practices Contact information: lchism@iupui.edu mjhansen@iupui.edu

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

COIL406323 - Ace Recommendation Platform - 1

Proving and Improving: Purposeful Themed Learning Communities AssessmentInternational Conference on The First-Year ExperienceLauren Chism, Associate ...
Read more

COIL406323 - Ace Recommendation Platform - 8

The Plenary“Interdisciplinary, integrated core curriculum emphasizing links across courses and ideas”P. Terenzini International FYE ConferenceBig ...
Read more

COIL406323 - Ace Recommendation Platform - 5

Examples of TLCsExamples of Themed Learning Communities: For Love AND Money (English, Psychology, Math & Career Exploration Seminar) Urban ...
Read more

CI-78 - Ace Recommendation Platform - 13

SOPHOMORE LEARNING COMMUNITYSophomore Learning CommunityService LearningDecision MakingLeadershipGroup Processing SkillsADDITIONAL COLLEGES WITH SOPHOMORE ...
Read more

TintoReview-Taking-Student-Retention-Seriously - Ace ...

Taking Student Retention Seriously: Rethinking the First Year of College Vincent Tinto Syracuse University Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in ...
Read more

TakingStudentRetentionSeriously - Ace Recommendation ...

7 The benefits for students are many. Students are more likely to form their own self-supporting groups that extend beyond the classroom, more likely to ...
Read more

Fall-2011-LC-Schedule - Ace Recommendation Platform - 1

Looking for classes? Check out SRJC’s Fall 2011 Learning Communities A Learning Community brings together two or more instructors and their students ...
Read more

six_best - Ace Recommendation Platform - 1

Get to Know The Six Best Practices for Student Success and GoalAttainmentIn last week’s Daily, the Success and Goal Attainment committee (SAGA)outlined ...
Read more