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Coaching & Mentoring -10H

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Information about Coaching & Mentoring -10H
Education

Published on February 26, 2013

Author: heshamhemaya

Source: authorstream.com

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PowerPoint Presentation: Coaching & Mentoring Private property do not duplicate with out authorization Prepared & Presented By Dr. Hesham Hemaya PowerPoint Presentation: Training time table Human Resources Management 2 Day 1 Defining Coaching and Mentoring What is coaching? What is Mentoring? Introducing the GROW model Day 2 Setting Goals Setting goals in the context of GROW Identifying Appropriate Goal Area Setting Smart Goals Day 3 Understanding the Reality Getting a Picture of Where you are Identifying Obstacles Exploring the Past PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 3 Day 4 Developing Options Identifying Paths Choosing your Final Approach Structuring a Plan Day 5 Setting Goals Setting goals in the context of GROW Identifying Appropriate Goal Area Setting Smart Goals Day 6 Wrapping it all UP Creating the Final Plan Identifying the First Step Getting Motivated Day 7 The Importance of Trust What is Trust? Trust and Coaching Building Trust PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 4 Day 8 Providing Feedback The Feedback Sandwich Providing Constructive Criticism Encouraging Growth and Development Day 9 Overcoming Roadblocks Common Obstacles Revaluating Goals Focusing on Progress Day 10 How Mentoring differs from Coaching The basic difference Adapting the GROW model for Mentoring Focus on the relationship PowerPoint Presentation: By the end of this course delegates will be able to understand : Objectives Human Resources Management 5 Defining Coaching and Mentoring What is management Setting Goals Understanding the Reality Developing Options The Importance of Trust Providing Feedback Overcoming Roadblocks How Mentoring differs from Coaching PowerPoint Presentation: Introduction Passing on knowledge that is not linked to a specific job Human Resources Management 6 Education Training Development Learning Developing skill in order to perform a specific job more effectively (Job oriented) Strategic plan designed to produce growth over time (Career oriented) Changes in individuals due to interaction with the environment PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 7 Conclusion Education is the matter of Community T & D is the matter of Organizations Learning is the matter of ALL Note: Training can not be separated from development Development is a logical sequence of training Training of an employee on specific skill leads to development serving a specific goal PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 8 How to identify training needs (TNA) ? (Survey, Performance Appraisal, Exit interview , Production rate , ….. ) Gathering Data Determine T. needs Propose Solutions Calculating Costs (Analyzing gathered data, Discuss with line manager , ….. ) (Job rotation, Coaching, Lecture training,….. ) (ROI, CBR, Compare offers , ….. ) Select the best and obtain approval then inform employee Choose & Decide PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 9 Who Needs Coaching ? Employee clustering Will Skills Coaching is not only the solution ? PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 10 Coach, Mentor Is there a difference? Mentor Coach Focus Individual Performance Role Facilitator with no agenda Specific agenda Relationship Self selecting Comes with the job Source of influence Perceived value Position Personal returns Affirmation/learning Teamwork/performance Arena Life Task related PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 11 Focus Mentors Informal relationship focus on the person , career and support for individual growth and maturity They can give advice but the partners is free to pick . The context does not have specific objectives . Mentoring is biased in your favor . Coach Job-focused and performance oriented . A coach is trying to direct a person to some end result , The person may choose how to get there, but the coach is strategically assessing and monitoring the progress and giving advices. Coaching is impartial, focused on improvement in behavior . In summary , the mentor has a deep personal interest, (Friend who cares about you and your long term development). The coach develops specific skills for the task, challenges and performance expectations at work. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 12 Role Mentoring is a power free , two-way mutually beneficial relationship . Mentors are facilitators and teachers allowing the partners to discover their own direction . Coaching H as to set agenda to reinforce or change skills and behaviors . The coach has an objective/goals for each discussion . In our study, the top four words chosen to best describe their mentor’s dominant style were—friend/confidant, direct, logical, questioner. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 13 Relationship Mentoring Even in formal mentoring programs the partners and mentor have choices—to continue, how long, how often, and our focus. Self-selection is the rule in informal mentoring relationships with the partners Coaching If I’m you mentor, you probably picked me . In an organization your coach hired you. Coaching comes with the job , in some organizations a defined competency for managers and leaders. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 14 Source of influence Mentoring A mentor’s influence is proportionate to the aded value they can bring to the relationship. It is a power free relationship based on mutual respect form both mentor and partners. Mentor" is a reputation that has to be personally earned, you are not a mentor until the partners says you are. Coaching The coach also has an actual level of authority by nature of their position, Your job description might contain "coach" it’s just a label or expectation. The interpersonal skills will determine the effectiveness of influence for both coach and mentor. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 15 Return Mentoring The mentoring relationship is reciprocal. There is a learning process for the mentor from the feedback of the partners. "The ability to look at situations from a different perspective, I am a Generation X and he is in his 60’s.“ Mentors needs not be an all-knowing expert such a position could be detrimental. In our study the most significant thing the mentor did was "listened and understood me" and, "built my confidence and trust in myself, empowered me to see what I could do." Coaching The coach’s returns are in the form of more team harmony, and job performance . The relationship is a vehicle to affirm the value of and satisfaction from fulfilling a role as helper and developer of others. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 16 Arena Mentoring A great deal of informal mentoring is occurring, with at risk youth, in our schools, as well as in volunteer, not for profit and for profit organizations. If I am your mentor chances are you have chosen me to be of help with some aspect of your life Mentors are sought for broader life and career issues. The partners is proactive in seeking out mentors and keeping the relationship productive. Coaching Coaching even in the sporting arena is task related improvement of knowledge, skills or abilities to better perform a given task. The coach creates the need for discussion and is responsible for follow up and holding others accountable. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 17 Conclusion Coaching and Mentoring are not the same thing . Our results and experience support the conclusion that mentoring is a power free , two-way mutually beneficial learning situation where the mentor provides advice, shares knowledge and experiences, and teaches. The mentor is both a source of information/knowledge and a Socratic questioner. If I am your coach you probably work for me and my concern is your performance, ability to adapt to change, and enrolling you support in the vision/direction for our work unit. If there is still doubt in your mind visualize how the conversation and relationship would be different if your manager scheduled a coaching discussion at 2:00 this afternoon to discuss your roles, responsibilities and expectations, versus if you called your mentor to discuss some things that you have been thinking about. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 18 Unconscious without skills Conscious without skills Conscious with skills Unconscious with skills Learning Ladder PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 19 Tools of “TNA” These analysis used to determine the trainings required and the data needs for construct the coaching plan Performance gap analysis (find the root problem to solve the gap) “ it may not require training ” Std. Actual (Reality) Should be (JD KPI,s) Steps from T. analysis Gap Analysis Technique ? PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 20 Return On Investment - ROI What Does Return On Investment - ROI Mean? A performance measure tool used to evaluate the efficiency of an investment (Training cost) related to returned benefits. To calculate ROI, the benefit (return) of an investment is divided by the cost of the investment; the result is expressed as a percentage or a ratio. Gain from investment – Cost of investment Cost of investment ROI = (Net saving) (Training cost) PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 21 Cost Benefits ratio - CBR A feasibility analysis “cost/benefit ” completed prior to conducting training. It is an estimate of the cost of the training weighed against the possible benefits that could be achieved if training were conducted. Benefits Cost CBR = (Total benefits) (Training cost) PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 22 On-the-Job Training (OJT) Every department must have a training person who have Coaching skills. Types of OJT Coaching Here an experienced worker or the trainee’s supervisor train the employee. Job rotation It is usually a management trainee he moves from job to job at planned intervals. Note: it must be on regular basis and for short while inside the dept. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 23 Pros and Cons Pros: 1- Minimize future problems. 2- Cost effective. 3- Hand on experience & Knowledge transfer. 4- No transportation required. Cons: 1- Closed management system. 2- Time consuming (trainer). PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 24 Shock Denial Anger Bargaining Depression Acceptance Productivity gap “Normal production rate” (hidden costs) Individuals that resist changes usually goes through a reaction cycle that affect their productivity negatively. Employee reaction cycle PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 25 Skills Inventory The skills inventory for org. “employees” is not less important than the org. products or stocks because al lot of money has been spent on them to reach that level. (we may call it Human Capital ) Develop Enrich Reshape PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 26 Is Coaching inborn or made ??? PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 27 A perspective on peer coaching Coaching… is a confidential process through which two or more professional colleagues work together to reflect on current practices; expand, refine and build skills ; share ideas; teach one another ; conduct classroom research; or solve problems in the workplace. (Robbins, 1991) PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 28 A perspective on mentoring Mentoring relates primarily to the identification and nurturing of potential for the whole person; it can be a long term relationship, where the goals may change but are always set by the learner . The learner owns both the goals and the process. ( Clutterbuck , 2004 ) PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 29 Coaching and Mentoring Key principles Awareness and responsibility Skills Effective questioning Active listening Self-reflection Empathy Behaviours Personal hidden drivers PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 30 Peer coaching and transfer of information Only 5% of new information is shared with an organisation following training. However with the addition of demonstration, practice and participation in peer coaching there is an increase to 90% in the transfer of new learning. Joyce and Showers PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 31 Behaviour Language Appearance Physical environment SEEN UNSEEN BELIEFS/ VALUES THOUGHTS EMOTIONS BEHAVIOUR HABITS CIRCUMSTANCES Personality PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 32 Johari window Open Hidden Blind Unknown Known to Others Known to Self Open to others Hidden from others by me Unknown for me and others Blind to me but seen by others PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 33 Unknown Blind Hidden Open Known to Others; Feedback Known to Self; Disclosure PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 34 Coaching behaviours Understand themselves Have self-control, empathy Have good ‘social’ skills Show interest in people and what they are doing Generate commitment to moving forward Encourage people to develop options Change perceptions, help people see things differently, lower fear PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 35 Active Listening Questioning Skills Coaching Conversation Model-GROW Giving & Receiving Feedback Model-S.B.I. BUILDING BLOCKS of COACHING PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 36 Active Listening, Questioning Skills & Coaching Conversations Coaching is about expanding people’s capacity to create the desired future . It is NOT TELLING PEOPLE WHAT TO DO , but ASKING THEM to examine the thinking behind what they’re doing so it is consistent with their goals. Coaching is about giving people the gift of your presence, asking questions, listening. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 37 Release aspirations Produce extraordinary results Build Capacity COACHING is everything you do to Amid change, complexity, competition Robert Hargrove. Masterful Coaching Field book ©2000 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 38 Active Listening Definition: Active listening is listening and responding that focuses the attention on the speaker and improves mutual understanding . PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 39 ACTIVE LISTENING… is one of the most important skills of an intelligent leader builds trust encourages positive problem-solving takes practice PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 40 Confirming Your Understanding Step 1 Use a confirming statement Step 2 Summarize key facts Step 3 Ask if your understanding is correct Step 4 Clarify misunderstandings (if necessary ) ACTIVE LISTENING… PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 41 Non- verbal Eye contact Pause/Silence Facial expressions that indicate you are present & focused Body Language ACTIVE LISTENING… PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 42 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 43 We can do this by: Clearing our mind. Giving 100% of our attention. Being non-judgmental. Paraphrasing-repeat what they have said in your words to demonstrate that you have understood the discussion and you have been actively listening PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 44 10 Tips to Active Listening 1. Be committed . Don’t walk away before there’s a natural conclusion to the conversation. 2. Don’t be a problem solver. Even if you have the perfect solution that can end the conversation quickly, wait. And then some more. 3. Pay attention to your non-verbal language. How are you standing/sitting? Do you have a glazed look on your face? 4. Keep listening! Avoid the temptation to daydream or to prepare a mental “To Do” list while listening. 5. Listen with love. Have a positive attitude during the conversation. This is not an interruption in your day but an opportunity to reflect God’s love during His day. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 45 6. Clarify what is being said. Don’t pretend to know what the speaker is talking about if you don’t. Don’t be afraid to ask speaker to repeat something that you didn’t hear or to clarify when needed. 7. Repeat what was said. Show you’re listening by reiterating what you heard the person say and how she feels 8. Prove you’re listening. When appropriate, nod, smile, congratulate, comment, etc. 9. Wait your turn. Don’t compose what you’re going to say while someone else is speaking. Stay focused on what is being said – you’ll have time to get your thoughts together. 10. Look at the person! Nothing is as insulting as having a conversation with someone who looks everywhere and at everyone but at you. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 46 Barriers that get in the way of listening… Discovering your negative listening habits Purpose: to help you gain self-awareness regarding negative listening patterns that you may have developed over the years. By being aware of them, you will be in a position to do something about them PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 47 The Faker All the outward signs are there: nodding, making eye contact, and giving the occasional uh huh . However, the faker isn’t concentrating on the speaker. His mind is elsewhere. The Interrupter The interrupter doesn’t allow the speaker to finish and doesn’t ask clarifying questions or seek more information from the speaker. He’s too anxious to speak his words and shows little concern for the speaker. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 48 The Intellectual or Logical Listener This person is always trying to interpret what the speaker is saying and why. He is judging the speaker’s words and trying to fit them into the logic box . He rarely asks about the underlying feeling or emotion attached to a message. The Rebuttal Maker This listener only listens long enough to form a rebuttal. His point is to use the speaker’s words against him . At his worst, he is argumentative and wants to prove you wrong. At the very least, the person always wants to make the speaker see the other point of view. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 49 The Advice Giver Giving advice is sometimes helpful; however, at other times, this behavior interferes with good listening , because it does not allow the speaker to fully articulate his feelings or it doesn ’ t help the speaker solve his own problems; it prohibits venting; Well-placed advice is an important function of leadership. However, advice given too quickly and at the wrong time is a turnoff to the speaker. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 50 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 51 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 52 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 53 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 54 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 55 Types of Questions Open Probing Closed PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 56 Open Questions Solicit more than a “ yes ” or “ no ” or other one-word response Aim to get someone to talk Are useful when you want general information Common lead-ins are what, how, and why PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 57 Solicit a “ yes ” or “ no ” or other one-word response Aim to limit talking or to control direction of conversation Are useful when you want specific information Common lead-ins are who, which, would, are, can, have, do, is, will, and may Closed Questions PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 58 Definition: Questions that do not introduce a new topic but allow you to probe further to find out more information. Examples include: “ Could you tell me more? ” “ Could you give me an example? ” “ Why was that? ” “ Could you expand? ” Probing Questions PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 59 The Funnel – Questioning Model PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 60 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 61 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 62 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 63 A Coaching conversation model that helps to structure the conversation and get maximum participation from your staff. This model is called G.R.O.W. A helpful tool … PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 64 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 65 The GROW model GROW steps G – GOAL: What do you want? R – REALITY: What is happening now ? O – OPTIONS: What could you do? W – WILL: What will you do? PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 66 The GROW model WILL What will you do next…? How, when, with whom…? What do you need from me? OPTIONS What could you do to move yourself just one step forward…? What are your options…? How far towards your objective will that take you…? REALITY What is happening now that tells you…? Describe the current situation… What made you realize that you need to do something different? GOAL What do you want to move forward on…? What can we achieve in the time available…? What would be the most helpful thing for you to take away from this session? TOPIC Tell me about… What would you like to think/talk about…? Give me a flavor in a few short sentences... T G R O W PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 67 G.R.O.W. Coaching Conversation Model G oal (1) set a goal and time limit for the session (2) state the goal for the issue after defining the Reality R eality Define current reality & desired reality & agree on any gap(s); explore reasons O ptions Explore alternative strategies/ courses of action for eliminating the gaps W rap up Agree on WHAT is to be done, WHEN & by WHOM – set a date for review PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 68 Coach/ Coachee ….% talking __%: __% PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 69 Coaching Practice #1 C CE Coach Coachee Coachee will talk about a situation they have that needs coaching. (Challenge or from Coaching Raw Material Handout) (2) Feedback. 3 min . (1) Coach 7 min. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 70 Coaching Practice #1 Debrief When you were in the role of coach what were some things you felt you did well? felt you did not do so well? What do you think you need to do to improve your coaching ability moving forward? PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 71 “You cannot lead, coach or teach anyone without his or her permission-even someone who reports to you. Sure, you can use all the authoritarian, heavy-handed tactics you want to make people accountable for showing up and doing certain tasks. However, it won’t make people feel responsible for the larger mission or be open to your teachable point of view. The idea is to inspire individuals and groups to produce extraordinary and tangible results, not to extract the results out of them. The ability to accomplish your goals depends ultimately on investing in your relationships until you have built a powerful partnership that can move mountains. This means realizing your goals by helping others realize theirs. It means building your success by building the success of others. It means engaging in coaching conversations in which you support one another’s growth and development, regardless of who reports to whom. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 72 SBI feed back model Putting SBI together, you can practice giving feedback using this ‘formula’: ”Last [date/day/time] during our [point of interaction, specific situation] , when you did/said [behavior], I felt [impact].” PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 73 Situation The key here is to be specific . Describing the context such as the time, location and any other information will contribute to the clarity of the message. NB: To be able to offer specific feedback it is best not to wait too long after an incident before sharing your impressions. Also, when leading in to a feedback session, if you do feel uncomfortable giving feedback, we encourage you to acknowledge this by saying something like, “as I am sharing this with you, I am aware that I feel ill at ease”. This simple yet clear statement allows you to acknowledge your own state. On the other hand, opening a feedback session by saying something like, “I have some negative feedback to give you.” Or, “You are not going to enjoy hearing this…”, creates unwarranted anxiety. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 74 Behavior This is the most important part of feedback. It is also the easiest to get wrong. The most challenging aspect for the majority of us is to describe the behavior in an objective, non-judgmental fashion. The key is to avoid bringing in a person’s individual characteristics and to focus instead specifically on a person’s actions. Rather than saying “you seemed clueless when you interacted with the patient”, say: “you struggled for words when you explained the patient’s chart to your colleague”. Pulling in your vulnerability (outside of the giving feedback role) such as “I had the same issues in the past”, or softening your feedback with: “you were rude with your colleague, but I also realize you had a high work load at the time”, will only dilute the message and reduce feedback effectiveness. Behavior does not only encompass the “what”, but also the “how” – the way in which the message is delivered. Variables such as body language, tone of voice, speaking manner and choice of words all contribute to the situation and should be considered part of the feedback message where appropriate. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 75 Impact The third part of giving effective feedback is to share what impact the other person has had on you . It’s not useful to speculate about a third party’s reaction to behavior so focus on yourself and, more importantly, share a point of view and encourage the other person to view the concerned behavior from another perspective. This creates trust in the dialog, which in turn leads to better overall communication and ultimately builds stronger relationships. Acknowledge how the behavior affected you personally as it is hard to argue with how you react to a certain behavior, since these are your emotions. An example could be “Last week at our staff meeting when you said that you consider our new patient initiative useless, it made me feel ‘run over’”. Offering an interpretation about the other person’s behavior such as “Last week at our meeting you showed disrespect for our new patient initiative” risks a fruitless discussion as the recipient can argue with your way of judging their behavior. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 76 Feedback in communication PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 77 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 78 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 79 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 80 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 81 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 82 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 83 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 84 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 85 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 86 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 87 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 88 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 89 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 90 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 91 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 92 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 93 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 94 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 95 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 96 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 97 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 98 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 99 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 100 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 101 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 102 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 103 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 104 Eight Don ’ ts of Coaching Don ’ t use taxi talk. Taxi talk is aimless assessments, observations, judgments and opinions. Stick with action talk; e.g. who does what, by when. Don ’ t try for giant steps. You ’ ll get there faster with a series of baby steps. Each successful step will produce motivating energy PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 105 Don ’ t be ambiguous Avoid vague, non-specific wording and phrases that are easily misunderstood. Don ’ t allow transference. Recognize the individuality of the person being coached. They are not you. Consider what actions they can take . Don ’ t project your abilities on them. Don ’ t stick to original goals Where better goals emerge. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 106 Don ’ t be a devil ’ s advocate. Look for and emphasize the positive. Recognize failure as learning and create new action ideas Don ’ t do the work for the person being coached. The coach imparts wisdom. Together the coach and person being coached think, shape, invent, decide . . . The person being coached takes the action steps. Don ’ t focus only on performance, Focus on the person as well. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 107 Specific Coaching can focus on what is needed most. Opportunistic Coaching can produce beneficial effects right now . Time sensitive Coaching can be delivered just in time . When it is needed, not too soon or too late. Motivating Coaches motivate via stimulation , inspiration and persistence. Features of Coaching Relationships PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 108 Supportive Coaches help the person they are coaching use existing skills better. Objective Coaching ought to be an objective outside point of view. The coach ’ s experience helps them to see the opportunity with more clarity. A leveraging strategy Coaching focuses on specifics i.e. just enough learning to help the right people people make precise changes. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 109 Apolitical Coaching can occur outside the normal office atmosphere . Oriented to performance Coaching focuses on finding or prescribing just the right actions the person being coached can take to change conditions. Supportive of corporate competencies Coaching is a tactic to cultivate specified competencies. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 110 Evolutionary elder The coach has more experience and know how than the person being coached. Coach can be a sounding board for ideas. Partner Coach benefits when the person being coached achieves. Champion Coach leads the supporting cheers. The Habits, Qualities, Attributes and Traits of a Good Coach PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 111 Guide Coach shows the person being coached the right steps to take, which pitfalls to avoid. Reality checker Coach helps person being coached evaluate progress towards goals. Visionary Coach (and person being coached) envision what success would look like. PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 112 Director Coach directs person being coached as to what actions to take. Uses phrases like “ try this . . . ” . Radar Coach often can see & understand what the person being coached cannot. Beacon Coach can sometimes sound an early warning. PowerPoint Presentation: Do you have any questions ? Human Resources Management 113 PowerPoint Presentation: Human Resources Management 114 The End

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