Co design and societal influence - atm seminar 160316

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Information about Co design and societal influence - atm seminar 160316

Published on March 16, 2016

Author: TanjaSuni

Source: slideshare.net

1. HOW TO COMMUNICATE AND CO- DESIGN YOUR RESEARCH? PhD Tanja Suni, Secretary General MA Iina Koskinen, Science Coordinator Future Earth Finland www.futureearthfinland.fi @FESuomi

2.     Increasing calls for better societal influence from research: •  Former and current government committed to it (TEAS, STN, leading by knowledge) •  The triple helix idea in private sector: government, industry, academia •  Science to support decision-making •  Scientists to give contexts and scenarios in media and public discourse •  Future Earth: co-design of research with stakeholders Many funding agencies nowadays require scientists to understand and utilise methodologies of co-design, co-production, and effective science communication. WHY COMMUNICATE AND CO-DESIGN RESEARCH?

3.     Strategic Reseach Council (Strategisen tutkimuksen neuvosto) •  More than 50 M€ per year total, typically about 1 M€ per year per project •  Two calls per year, funding period 6 yrs/3 yrs •  Strategic themes recommended by the Council, approved by the government •  Break-through technologies, urban development, climate-neutral circular economy, security, equality •  Consortia of at least 3 partners, in practice from 5 to 10 •  Co-design and interaction plan required, support for professional facilitation VN TEA funding (Strategic funding from Prime Minister’s Office) •  Research to support decision-making. One main call + complementary call per year •  5.7 M€ per year, 37 projects – from a few months to 2 years •  Commissioned research for a particular problem Government’s key project funding via Academy of Finland and Tekes •  Improving societal influence of ongoing research: adding the element of stakeholder engagement, piloting, experimenting, application development •  300 000 € for 2 years •  Eligibility: PIs in an international/Academy project, max 14 yrs from PhD FUNDING INSTRUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR SOCIETALLY RELEVANT RESEARCH

4.     1.  What kind of societal impact can research have? 2.  Route to impact: co-design and co-production of research 3.  Why and how to build your expert profile as a scientist? OUTLINE

5. Formula for research impact Stakeholder   need   Compe00ve   results   Successful   communica0on   Desired   impact  

6. RESEARCH ON IMPACT

7.     RESEARCH ON IMPACT

8.     1.  What kind of societal impact can research have? 2.  Route to impact: co-design and co-production of research 3.  Why and how to build your expert profile as a scientist? OUTLINE

9.    The societal influence of research has been studied for decades. Main factors influencing the usability and applicability of scientific results: •  Amount and quality of the interaction between the producers and users of science •  Applicability of scientific knowledge for the users’ needs. Factors that advance the utilisation of scientific knowledge include •  Co-designing and co-producing research. •  Long-term and trust-building relationships between producers and users of scientific knowledge. •  One good way of maintaining such relationships is via “boundary organisations”. SCIENCE IN SUPPORT OF SOCIETY – SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND

10. Source: Future Earth Initial Design Report (2013) STAKEHOLDERS: Policy and decision makers and planners on government and city level, citizens, NGOs, private sector, media ”CO-DESIGN” OF RESEARCH

11.     •  Ideally: identifying research questions together •  At minimum: designing end-products together with the users. At any point of the project but the earlier, the better •  An opportunity for scientists to become visible in society and to influence societal development by ensuring the scientific excellence of research questions •  Co-design is not synonymous to purely user-driven, commissioned research! Researchers bring to the discussion wider perspectives, different time scales, and information about the background and interconnectivity of problems. CO-DESIGN AND CO-PRODUCTION OF RESEARCH

12. Value-chain/stakeholder map Research Community Psychology Criminology Anthropology Cultural studies Ethnology History Law Sociology Economy Political science Relgious studies Policy Makers EU National goverments Operative actors Migrant advocacy groups Schools Healthcare providers Prison authorities Religious communities Immigration authorities NGOs (children, young, women) Parties Media Immigrants Children Young Families Local communities Neighbourhoods General public Policies Knowledge Recommendations Methods Knowledge Rough example: Contemporary radicalisation trends and their implications for Europe (SC6-REV- INEQUAL-02-2016)

13. ESIMERKKI HANKKEEN SIDOSRYHMÄJAOSTA Durham E., Baker H., Smith M., Moore E. & Morgan V. (2014). The BiodivERsA Stakeholder Engagement Handbook. BiodivERsA, Paris (108 pp). EXAMPLE OF STAKEHOLDER PRIORIZATION

14.     LEVELS OF CO-DESIGN AND EXAMPLES FOR COOPERATION The BiodivERsA Stakeholder Engagement Handbook www.biodiversa.org/577 Durham E., Baker H., Smith M., Moore E. & Morgan V. (2014) BiodivERsA, Paris (108 pp)

15. How to co-design a research project? Proposal phase: • The value-chain: identifying actors necessary for best possible results and solutions for stakeholders • Thematic workshops for researchers and key stakeholders: • Elementary mapping of stakeholder needs within the boundaries of the research • Co-designing the guiding research questions • Concrete interaction & communication plan for co-designing research and end- products together and for communicating to larger audiences • Clear roles for stakeholders: complementary knowledge, analysis and interpretation of data, co-designing end-products, joint leadership with researchers on specific tasks Research phase: • Adhere to the interaction plan: every step in it must have a purpose relevant for the research! • Utilise participatory methods in your meetings, workshops, Townhalls • Create a public profile for the research via continuous communication

16.     1.  What kind of societal impact can research have? 2.  Route to impact: co-design and co-production of research 3.  Why and how to build your expert profile as a scientist? OUTLINE

17.     SCIENCE COMMUNICATION – WHY BOTHER? Compe&&on  for  a,en&on  is  tough!     -­‐  This  is  true  for  academic,  policy,  media,  and  lay  audiences!     Public  discourse  needs  scien&fic  knowledge  and  good  arguments   -­‐  You  are  part  of  the  democra0c  process:  make  your  results  available  and   enhance  the  decision-­‐making  and  understanding  capacity  of  the  decision-­‐ makers  and  the  public   -­‐  Provide  new  knowledge  and  correct  false  opinions  –  interest  groups  are  eager   to  take  the  floor  if  you  don’t  (e.g.  climate  pollu0on).     You  have  a  lot  of  offer!   -­‐  You  are  an  expert  of  your  own  field  and  your  field  is  broader  than  you  think!       You  already  have  an  expert  profile  (just  google  yourself)  –  why  not  to  shape  it   yourself!    

18.     SCIENCE COMMUNICATION – WHY BOTHER?

19.     SCIENCE COMMUNICATION – 2 FUNCTIONS AND ROLES FOR SCIENTISTS   1)   communicate  your  research  and  research  results     Research  communica0on  &  research  communica0on  profile.   +   2)  take  part  in  public  discourse   Scien0sts  framing,  contextualizing  and  analyzing  events  in  nature   and  in  society.  Public  communica0on  profile.     =  Your  expert  profile  as  a  scien&st    

20.     SCIENCE COMMUNICATION – HOW TO BUILD YOUR EXPERT PROFILE?   1)   communicate  your  research  and  research  results     Communica0on  takes  0me.  Design  a  detailed  communica0on  plan  and  s0ck  to  it!       First  steps:   1.  Set  your  goal  and  iden&fy  your  stakeholders  –  who  should  know  about  your   research  in  different  phases  of  research?   2.  What  are  your  key  messages  in  plain  English?  What  is  useful  informa0on  for   your  stakeholders?   3.  Start  sharing  your  knowledge  already  in  the  beginning  of  the  project:  info   graphics,  visualiza0ons,  write  a  column  /  opinion  piece   4.  Choose  your  channels:  e.g.  TwiXer  and  research  blog,  online  portals  (Climate   guide.fi)  

21.     SCIENCE COMMUNICATION – HOW TO BUILD YOUR EXPERT PROFILE?   TWITTER   Decision-­‐makers  and  journalists  follow  TwiXer,  find  your  audiences  here!     People  are  interested  in  other  people  and  research  projects  end  at  some  point  –  tweet   as  a  person!     Easy  ways  to  start:   1)  Remember,  the  life-­‐span  of  one  tweet  is  7  minutes,  don’t  overthink  it!   2)  If  your  project  is  short,  it  is  beXer  to  use  #  (hashtag)  than  create  a  TwiXer   account  for  the  project   3)  Start  live-­‐twee0ng  from  a  seminar  etc.  Write  a  couple  of  tweets  before  hand.   4)  TwiXer  is  about  sharing.  Share  interes0ng  tweets  and  choose  right  #!   5)  Remember  human  interest.            

22.         Easy  ways  to  start:   5)  Remember  human  interest.                

23.     SCIENCE COMMUNICATION – HOW TO BUILD YOUR EXPERT PROFILE?   RESEARCH  /  SCIENCE  BLOG:     Over  1,8  m  of  scien0fic  ar0cles  every  year,  50%  have  less  5  readers  per  ar0cle.   Blogging  widens  readership!  Case  Melissa  Terras  (2009).   More  space  to  share  your  exper0se  –  in  the  way  you  want  to  share  it.       Easy  ways  to  start  :   1)  Remember,  research  blog  is  both  for  follow  scien0sts  AND  lay  audiences   2)  Use  plain  English  (aerosols    è 0ny  atmospheric  par0cles) 3)  Various  op0ons  for  topics:  your  own  research  content  (progress,  results,  field   trips  etc.),  latest  developments  in  your  field,  reports  from  seminars  you  aXend/ organize,  comments  on  0mely  conversa0ons  and  events  (COP21)   4)   Use  short  and  aXrac0ve  headlines  and  ac0ve  voice!     For  &ps  on  Twi,er,  blogs  and  visualiza&ons,  see  Future  Earth:   h"p://www.futureearth.org/blog/pop-­‐webinars        

24.     SCIENCE COMMUNICATION – HOW TO BUILD YOUR EXPERT PROFILE? 2)  take  part  in  public  discourse   Fact  and  opinion  –  no  clear  dis0nc0on!  Public  discourse  needs  good  arguments!     What  scien&sts  have  to  offer  for  media  and  public  discourse:   •  Analysis  based  on  scien0fic  knowledge   •  Informed  assessments  and  viewpoints   •  Crea0ng  a  context   •  Specula0ons  and  scenarios  for  future   Step  out  of  you  comfort  zone  and  widen  your  exper&se.     Too  much  for  you?  Remember,  part  of  your  exper0se  as  a  researcher   is  to  know  where  to  get  informa0on!      

25.     SCIENCE COMMUNICATION – HOW TO BUILD YOUR EXPERT PROFILE?   How  to  survive  with  journalists  –  a  few  &ps:     1)  Follow  the  media  and  get  to  know  the  right  journalists!  (Climate:  Heli   Saavalainen,  HS,  Pasi  Toiviainen  (YLE),  Mikko  PelXari  (Yliopistoleh0).   2)  Contact  the  right  journalist  via  targeted  email  –  journalists  don’t  have  0me  to   read  press  releases  and  aXend  press  breakfasts   3)  Check  the  media  and  ar0cle  type  before  hand   4)  Discuss  the  content  of  the  interview  beforehand  –  remember  that  you  can   shape  the  agenda   5)  You  have  a  right  to  check  your  quotes  but  don’t  make  too  many  correc0ons,  if   possible.     Make  your  voice  heard  proac0vely  -­‐  Build  you  your  expert  profile  in   print  and  online  media!  

26. Future Earth Finland – national committee for global change research Division of Atmospheric Sciences PO BOX 48 (Erik Palméninaukio 1),00140 Helsinki info@futureearthfinland.fi www.futureearthfinland.fi @FESuomi JOIN OUR MAILING LIST WELCOME TO WORK WITH FUTURE EARTH FINLAND! We are always looking for new contacts in the global change research community, the public and private sector, and the media.  

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