Claymation Instructions for the Classroom

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Information about Claymation Instructions for the Classroom

Published on February 17, 2008

Author: shines

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Slideshow to teach your students how to create clay animations in your classroom.

Claymation Tips and Instructions Adapted by Sandra Hines and Mary Tune from PPT created by Stephanie Foster Little Elm ISD

Lunch Options 1 ½ hour lunch as planned Shorter lunch 30 min… 45 min… Come and go lunch (Instructors stay and work with anyone here)

1 ½ hour lunch as planned

Shorter lunch 30 min… 45 min…

Come and go lunch (Instructors stay and work with anyone here)

Enduring Understanding Technology, when used as a natural part of an integrated lesson in the content areas, increases student motivation and allows for creative outlets.

Technology, when used as a natural part of an integrated lesson in the content areas, increases student motivation and allows for creative outlets.

Essential Questions Is the frustration of using technology worth the effort? How can technology be used to effectively assess student knowledge of a concept?

Is the frustration of using technology worth the effort?

How can technology be used to effectively assess student knowledge of a concept?

What is Claymation? Claymation, or Clay Animation, uses clay figures to illustrate a story or concept and computer software to animate the still photographs of the clay figures. Examples Tech4Learning Wichita State University

Claymation, or Clay Animation, uses clay figures to illustrate a story or concept and computer software to animate the still photographs of the clay figures.

Examples

Tech4Learning

Wichita State University

Why do an animation? An animation is a great way to assess knowledge of grade level reading, math, science, or social studies TEKS. It is fun, your students will love the project. It brings out creativeness in your students that you would not imagine.

An animation is a great way to assess knowledge of grade level reading, math, science, or social studies TEKS.

It is fun, your students will love the project.

It brings out creativeness in your students that you would not imagine.

Materials Needed Your imagination Storyboard Digital Cameras Materials for a background Materials for characters Computer PhotoStory3, PowerPoint or Animation and Movie Software

Your imagination

Storyboard

Digital Cameras

Materials for a background

Materials for characters

Computer

PhotoStory3, PowerPoint or Animation and Movie Software

Steps to Creating an Animation Step One – Come up with a Story Concept Step Two – Create a Storyboard Step Three - Design and create the background Step Four - Design and create the characters Step Five – Take the pictures Step Six – Create the Animation Step Seven - Share

Step One – Come up with a Story Concept

Step Two – Create a Storyboard

Step Three - Design and create the background

Step Four - Design and create the characters

Step Five – Take the pictures

Step Six – Create the Animation

Step Seven - Share

Step One Come up with a story or concept. Use your imagination! Examples: the water cycle, long division, fractions, a scene from a play or story you are studying Solution to a problem The story is the most important part of the claymation project! Project Planner Sheet

Come up with a story or concept.

Use your imagination!

Examples: the water cycle, long division, fractions, a scene from a play or story you are studying

Solution to a problem

The story is the most important part of the claymation project!

Project Planner Sheet

Step Two Create a storyboard. Storyboards don’t have to be detailed. They just need to show the overall concept of the animation. Storyboards can be simple pictures or words, or a combination of both. The more you include in your storyboard, the easier it will be to create your characters.

Create a storyboard.

Storyboards don’t have to be detailed. They just need to show the overall concept of the animation.

Storyboards can be simple pictures or words, or a combination of both.

The more you include in your storyboard, the easier it will be to create your characters.

Storyboard Software Kidspiration or Inspiration Storyboard Pro (free software download) with tutorials

Kidspiration or Inspiration

Storyboard Pro (free software download) with tutorials

Storyboard Example for older students: PT3 Example and explanation

Storyboards for younger students: A simple piece of construction paper folded into 6 squares works perfect as a storyboard . Create a concept map or flow chart showing the sequence of the story.

A simple piece of construction paper folded into 6 squares works perfect as a storyboard .

Create a concept map or flow chart showing the sequence of the story.

Storyboard Example Example taken from http://library.thinkquest.org/22316/start.html

Step Three Design and create your background Materials needed: Construction Paper Markers or Crayons Glue Cardboard Boxes Cotton balls

Design and create your background

Materials needed:

Construction Paper

Markers or Crayons

Glue

Cardboard Boxes

Cotton balls

You want your characters and their actions to be the focus of your animation, not what is behind them. Background Tip

You want your characters and their actions to be the focus of your animation, not what is behind them.

Make sure your background is not so large that it makes your characters seem too small. A large size piece of construction paper is plenty big. A box that reams of paper comes in is perfect. Background Tip

Make sure your background is not so large that it makes your characters seem too small.

A large size piece of construction paper is plenty big.

A box that reams of paper comes in is perfect.

3-D additions to your background make your animation more appealing. A box and a downward camera angle are great ways to add depth to your animation. Pop ups on your background are also great ways to add depth. Background Tip

3-D additions to your background make your animation more appealing.

A box and a downward camera angle are great ways to add depth to your animation.

Pop ups on your background are also great ways to add depth.

EXAMPLES of GREAT BACKGROUNDS!

EXAMPLES of GREAT BACKGROUNDS!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step Four Design and create characters Create a lightweight armature out of pipe cleaners or wire, styrofoam, and aluminum foil ( PT3 example) Cover the armature with a thin “skin” of clay TIP… put magnets in their feet and use a cookie sheet for a floor

Design and create characters

Create a lightweight armature out of pipe cleaners or wire, styrofoam, and aluminum foil ( PT3 example)

Cover the armature with a thin “skin” of clay

TIP… put magnets in their feet and use a cookie sheet for a floor

Materials you will definitely need! Clay Pipe Cleaners: they allow your body to bend. Foil: wrap your character in foil to add thickness, strength, and to help the clay stick. Styrofoam Balls: great for head or feet.

Clay

Pipe Cleaners: they allow your body to bend.

Foil: wrap your character in foil to add thickness, strength, and to help the clay stick.

Styrofoam Balls: great for head or feet.

Extra Materials Popsicle sticks Pompoms Erasers Yarn or string Toothpicks Stick on Eyes Scissors Plastic Spoons or Knives

Popsicle sticks

Pompoms

Erasers

Yarn or string

Toothpicks

Stick on Eyes

Scissors

Plastic Spoons or Knives

Make sure that your characters are 1 and a half to three inches tall. Characters that are too tall will not stand up. Character Tip

Make sure that your characters are 1 and a half to three inches tall.

Characters that are too tall will not stand up.

Good Characters These characters are not too tall and they are very detailed. Built and designed by a third grader and a fifth grader.

These characters are not too tall and they are very detailed.

Built and designed by a third grader and a fifth grader.

Good Characters These characters are perfect size and very detailed. Designed and created by a 5 th grade resource student with the help of a first grader.

These characters are perfect size and very detailed.

Designed and created by a 5 th grade resource student with the help of a first grader.

Good Characters Spongebob is a great character. The materials that he was made of caused him to be top heavy. The creator compensated by placing something behind him to support the weight.

Spongebob is a great character.

The materials that he was made of caused him to be top heavy.

The creator compensated by placing something behind him to support the weight.

Good characters

Not So Good Character This character is not very detailed, as you can see it has no mouth. It is also a little bit too tall.

This character is not very detailed, as you can see it has no mouth.

It is also a little bit too tall.

Not So Good Character This character is too small. It is also not covered with clay. It is unappealing to the eye.

This character is too small.

It is also not covered with clay.

It is unappealing to the eye.

Not So Good Character This character is not very well put together. It is not completely covered in clay It appears very sloppy.

This character is not very well put together.

It is not completely covered in clay

It appears very sloppy.

Step Five Take the pictures Set up your camera Use good lighting Practice Shoot

Take the pictures

Set up your camera

Use good lighting

Practice

Shoot

Make sure your camera is on the correct setting. Setting mega-pixels too low will make the pictures appear blurry or distorted. Setting mega-pixels too high will cause your animation to be too large unless you edit the picture files. Today we will be using 2 mega-pixels. Camera Tips

Make sure your camera is on the correct setting.

Setting mega-pixels too low will make the pictures appear blurry or distorted.

Setting mega-pixels too high will cause your animation to be too large unless you edit the picture files.

Today we will be using 2 mega-pixels.

Make sure you have a stable surface for the camera to sit on, such as a tripod. It is important that your camera does not move at all during the making of your animation. Find a well lighted place in the room or mount a lamp directed toward the set. Make markings where the camera goes. Camera Tips

Make sure you have a stable surface for the camera to sit on, such as a tripod.

It is important that your camera does not move at all during the making of your animation.

Find a well lighted place in the room or mount a lamp directed toward the set.

Make markings where the camera goes.

If your camera only has digital zoom, do not zoom, simply place camera for best angle and picture. If you are using a camera with floppy disk, you might need multiple disks. Number the floppy disk to keep your pictures in order. Camera Tips

If your camera only has digital zoom, do not zoom, simply place camera for best angle and picture.

If you are using a camera with floppy disk, you might need multiple disks.

Number the floppy disk to keep your pictures in order.

Set up the background and characters and do a practice run before you begin taking pictures. Move the characters about a half an inch at a time. 30 to 70 pictures make a great animation. Use your run through to test this. Camera Tips

Set up the background and characters and do a practice run before you begin taking pictures.

Move the characters about a half an inch at a time.

30 to 70 pictures make a great animation. Use your run through to test this.

Elevate the camera to get the best shots of your animation. One person should be in charge of holding the camera still and taking the pictures. Another person should be in charge of moving the characters. Camera Tips

Elevate the camera to get the best shots of your animation.

One person should be in charge of holding the camera still and taking the pictures.

Another person should be in charge of moving the characters.

Camera Placement Good example

Good example

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not so good example Camera Placement

Not so good example

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ms. Bilbrey saves the day!!

She is my HERO (and favorite principal!!)

Retake the picture. When you start to insert pictures in PhotoStory 3 or PowerPoint, simply skip the picture you don’t want to use. Insert the good picture. What if I take a bad picture?

Retake the picture.

When you start to insert pictures in PhotoStory 3 or PowerPoint, simply skip the picture you don’t want to use.

Insert the good picture.

Some cameras require you to finalize the disk you are using. (Sony Mavica w/ CD) Use the Setup function of the camera to finalize the disk. Research your camera’s functions to find out the requirements needed to retrieve pictures. Camera Tips Some cameras require you to finalize the disk you are using. (Sony Mavica w/ CD) Use the Setup function of the camera to finalize the disk. Research your camera’s functions to find out the requirements needed to retrieve pictures.

Some cameras require you to finalize the disk you are using.

(Sony Mavica w/ CD)

Use the Setup function of the camera to finalize the disk.

Research your camera’s functions to find out the requirements needed to retrieve pictures.

Some cameras require you to finalize the disk you are using.

(Sony Mavica w/ CD)

Use the Setup function of the camera to finalize the disk.

Research your camera’s functions to find out the requirements needed to retrieve pictures.

Step Six Import your pictures into PhotoStory 3 or PowerPoint Add voice, word bubbles or different accents Set up the timing for each picture Add music if desired Sit back and watch your creation

Import your pictures into PhotoStory 3 or PowerPoint

Add voice, word bubbles or different accents

Set up the timing for each picture

Add music if desired

Sit back and watch your creation

Transferring Images – Camera To Computer Create a folder on your desktop. Right Click on the desktop, choose NEW and select FOLDER . Name the folder ANIMATION PICS.

Create a folder on your desktop.

Right Click on the desktop, choose NEW and select FOLDER . Name the folder ANIMATION PICS.

Remove your floppy disk/ CDRW from the camera Place it in the drive on your computer. Double click on the My Computer Icon on the Desktop of your computer. Find the removable device that you are using A: drive for a floppy and D: drive for a CDRW.

Remove your floppy disk/ CDRW from the camera

Place it in the drive on your computer.

Double click on the My Computer Icon on the Desktop of your computer.

Find the removable device that you are using A: drive for a floppy and D: drive for a CDRW.

Double-click on the disk or drive icon to open it. Then, navigate to the folder containing your images and open it.

Double-click on the disk or drive icon to open it. Then, navigate to the folder containing your images and open it.

From this folder click on the Edit menu and choose Select All.

From this folder click on the Edit menu and choose Select All.

Click Edit on the menu again and choose Copy. Close this window down Open the Animation Pics folder on your desktop . Click Edit on the menu and select Paste This will copy your pictures from your disk to your folder.

Click Edit on the menu again and choose Copy.

Close this window down

Open the Animation Pics folder on your desktop .

Click Edit on the menu and select Paste

This will copy your pictures from your disk to your folder.

Importing Pictures in PowerPoint Open up PowerPoint and start with a slide that has Title and Text layout.

Open up PowerPoint and start with a slide that has Title and Text layout.

Importing Pictures in PowerPoint Click on the menu Insert, choose Picture , New Photo Album Navigate to the picture folder on the computer Select your first picture and hold down the shift key and select the last picture, then select File/Disk

Click on the menu Insert, choose Picture , New Photo Album

Navigate to the picture folder on the computer

Select your first picture and hold down the shift key and select the last picture, then select File/Disk

Importing Pictures continued Move through all the pictures to make adjustments Picture Layout should be set to “Fit to Slide Select Create when ready

Move through all the pictures to make adjustments

Picture Layout should be set to “Fit to Slide

Select Create when ready

All the pictures should be in PowerPoint and sized it to fit the whole screen.

Adding Word Bubbles Use the Drawing Toolbar at the bottom of the screen Click on AUTOSHAPES/ CALLOUTS Point to your slide and draw on the word bubble shape

Use the Drawing Toolbar at the bottom of the screen

Click on AUTOSHAPES/ CALLOUTS

Point to your slide and draw on the word bubble shape

 

Setting the Timing Click on Slideshow and select Slide Transition.

Click on Slideshow and select Slide Transition.

Setting the Timing Using the Task Pane on the right, check off Automatically after Set the timing to 0 seconds or 1 second (You may want to increase the time, if you added a lot of text) Click Apply to All Slides

Using the Task Pane on the right, check off Automatically after

Set the timing to 0 seconds or 1 second

(You may want to increase the time, if you added a lot of text)

Click Apply to All Slides

Examples of Animations! Lights Camera Action

Lights

Camera

Action

NOW, LETS GET STARTED!!

Step One Come up with a story or concept you would like to animate. Some examples are: the water cycle, long division, fractions, a scene from a play or story you are studying Use your imagination, there are no limits to what you can come up with.

Come up with a story or concept you would like to animate.

Some examples are: the water cycle, long division, fractions, a scene from a play or story you are studying

Use your imagination, there are no limits to what you can come up with.

Step Two Create a storyboard. Storyboards don’t have to be detailed. They just need to show the overall concept of the animation. Storyboards can be simple pictures or words, or a combination of both.

Create a storyboard.

Storyboards don’t have to be detailed. They just need to show the overall concept of the animation. Storyboards can be simple pictures or words, or a combination of both.

Step Three Design and create your background.

Design and create your background.

Step Four Build your characters.

Build your characters.

Step Five Set up your camera (remember lighting) Practice Shoot

Set up your camera (remember lighting)

Practice

Shoot

Step Six Import your pictures into PhotoStory 3 Add voice or different accents Set up the timing of the animation Sit back and watch your creation

Import your pictures into PhotoStory 3

Add voice or different accents

Set up the timing of the animation

Sit back and watch your creation

TIME TO SHARE Tell us what the idea of your animation was. Show your animation Tell us your likes and dislikes about your final project.

Tell us what the idea of your animation was.

Show your animation

Tell us your likes and dislikes about your final project.

Tips and Tricks The first time you do an animation with your students, let them have fun with it. Don’t set to many expectations. Just let them use their imaginations.

The first time you do an animation with your students, let them have fun with it. Don’t set to many expectations. Just let them use their imaginations.

Time Required Depends on how prepared you and your students are. First timers: 1 to 2 days (weeks?) Experienced animators who know exactly what they want to achieve: no longer than a day.

Depends on how prepared you and your students are.

First timers: 1 to 2 days (weeks?)

Experienced animators who know exactly what they want to achieve: no longer than a day.

How To Create Clay Animation in 5 Easy Steps Clay Animation Made Easy The Clay Animation Station Clay GIF Animation Tech4Learning Clay Animation Contact Information Web Resources

How To Create Clay Animation in 5 Easy Steps

Clay Animation Made Easy

The Clay Animation Station

Clay GIF Animation

Tech4Learning Clay Animation

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