Ch24.3&4 The Changing Family & Science V2008

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Information about Ch24.3&4 The Changing Family & Science V2008

Published on February 13, 2008

Author: beachta

Source: slideshare.net

THE CHANGING FAMILY & SCIENCE AND THOUGHT OF THE 19 TH CENTURY Eastview High School – AP European History Ch24 – Life in the Emerging Urban Society Section 3 – The Changing Family Section 4 – Science & Thought of the 19 th Century McKay et al. 8 th edition

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS How did families change as they coped with the challenges and opportunities of the developing urban civilization? What changes in science and thought reflected and influenced this new civilization?

How did families change as they coped with the challenges and opportunities of the developing urban civilization?

What changes in science and thought reflected and influenced this new civilization?

PREMARITAL SEX & MARRIAGE QUESTIONS: Why is there a decline in illegitimacy rates after 1850? For the middle classes, economic considerations continued to be paramount in choosing marriage partners through most of the nineteenth century. Increasing economic well-being allowed members of the working class to select marriage partners based more on romance. Prostitution was common. Middle- and upper-class men frequently visited prostitutes.

QUESTIONS:

Why is there a decline in illegitimacy rates after 1850?

For the middle classes, economic considerations continued to be paramount in choosing marriage partners through most of the nineteenth century.

Increasing economic well-being allowed members of the working class to select marriage partners based more on romance.

Prostitution was common.

Middle- and upper-class men frequently visited prostitutes.

GENDER ROLES & FAMILY LIFE QUESTIONS: What types of jobs were husbands and wives able to get where they could work together after 1850? What differences existed b/w feminists inspired by socialism and middle-class feminists? What positive aspect was created with the rigid separation of men and women in society? Kinship ties helped working-class people to cope with sickness, unemployment, death, and old age. The status of women changed during the nineteenth century. The division of labor became more defined by gender. Economic inferiority led some women to organize for equality and women’s rights. As society increasingly relegated women to the domestic sphere, women gained control over household finances and the education of children. Married couples developed stronger emotional ties to each other.

QUESTIONS:

What types of jobs were husbands and wives able to get where they could work together after 1850?

What differences existed b/w feminists inspired by socialism and middle-class feminists?

What positive aspect was created with the rigid separation of men and women in society?

Kinship ties helped working-class people to cope with sickness, unemployment, death, and old age.

The status of women changed during the nineteenth century.

The division of labor became more defined by gender.

Economic inferiority led some women to organize for equality and women’s rights.

As society increasingly relegated women to the domestic sphere, women gained control over household finances and the education of children.

Married couples developed stronger emotional ties to each other.

CHILD REARING QUESTIONS: Why was there a reduction in the size of the European family? What was Freud’s general thesis? Mr., Mrs., and Baby ? My Secret Life? Attitudes toward children also changed during this period. Emotional ties between mothers and infants deepened. There was more breast-feeding and less swaddling and abandonment of babies. Increased connection often meant increased control, including attempts to repress the child’s sexuality.

QUESTIONS:

Why was there a reduction in the size of the European family?

What was Freud’s general thesis?

Mr., Mrs., and Baby ?

My Secret Life?

Attitudes toward children also changed during this period.

Emotional ties between mothers and infants deepened.

There was more breast-feeding and less swaddling and abandonment of babies.

Increased connection often meant increased control, including attempts to repress the child’s sexuality.

THE TRIUMPH OF SCIENCE QUESTIONS: Where did theoretical science find practical applications… what fields? What are the consequences of the triumph of science and technology? Theoretical discoveries resulted in practical benefits, as in chemistry and electricity. Scientific achievements gave science considerable prestige.

QUESTIONS:

Where did theoretical science find practical applications… what fields?

What are the consequences of the triumph of science and technology?

Theoretical discoveries resulted in practical benefits, as in chemistry and electricity.

Scientific achievements gave science considerable prestige.

CHARLES DARWIN QUESTIONS: What was Darwin’s theory of evolution? What are the social consequences of Darwin’s theory? What is the theory of Social Darwinism? Who was Herbert Spencer and how is his contribution significant? Changes in the conceptions of the universe, man, and religion Charles Darwin and the impact of the theory of evolution – he postulated that species change and survive because of chance, not a divinely-ordained purpose He believed nature is a struggle among organisms for survival – life is not intended to be harmonious a.k.a. survival of the fittest Darwin’s theory challenged Biblical account of creation Social Darwinism – applying the principles of biological evolution to human society. Certain people are more able to adapt and compete and the poor just don’t “fit” or try hard enough Herbert Spencer , another Social Darwinist, postulated that the poor were the “ill-fated weak and the prosperous were the chosen strong.”

QUESTIONS:

What was Darwin’s theory of evolution?

What are the social consequences of Darwin’s theory?

What is the theory of Social Darwinism?

Who was Herbert Spencer and how is his contribution significant?

Changes in the conceptions of the universe, man, and religion

Charles Darwin and the impact of the theory of evolution – he postulated that species change and survive because of chance, not a divinely-ordained purpose

He believed nature is a struggle among organisms for survival – life is not intended to be harmonious a.k.a. survival of the fittest

Darwin’s theory challenged Biblical account of creation

Social Darwinism – applying the principles of biological evolution to human society.

Certain people are more able to adapt and compete and the poor just don’t “fit” or try hard enough

Herbert Spencer , another Social Darwinist, postulated that the poor were the “ill-fated weak and the prosperous were the chosen strong.”

SOCIAL SCIENCES QUESTIONS: Who was Comte and what was positivist method? Who was Dmitri Mendeleev and what are his scientific contributions? Who was Michael Faraday and what are his scientific contributions? New “social sciences” used data collected by states to test theories. Auguste Comte, a French philosopher, wrote the six-volume System of Positive Philosophy – he postulated that all intellectual activity progresses through predictable stages: Theological or fictitious – a necessary point of departure of human understanding Metaphysical or abstract – a transition Scientific or positive – the fixed and definitive state Social Darwinists such as Spencer applied Darwin’s ideas to human affairs.

QUESTIONS:

Who was Comte and what was positivist method?

Who was Dmitri Mendeleev and what are his scientific contributions?

Who was Michael Faraday and what are his scientific contributions?

New “social sciences” used data collected by states to test theories.

Auguste Comte, a French philosopher, wrote the six-volume System of Positive Philosophy – he postulated that all intellectual activity progresses through predictable stages:

Theological or fictitious – a necessary point of departure of human understanding

Metaphysical or abstract – a transition

Scientific or positive – the fixed and definitive state

Social Darwinists such as Spencer applied Darwin’s ideas to human affairs.

THE REALIST MOVEMENT QUESTIONS: Realist writers – what did they attempt to do? Sister Carrie? The World of Yesterday? Emile Zola? Feodor Dostoevski? The Human Comedy? The Realist Movement in literature reflected the ethos of European society. This was an expression of writers who sought to depict life as it really was. Realism stressed the hereditary and environmental determinants of human behavior.

QUESTIONS:

Realist writers – what did they attempt to do?

Sister Carrie?

The World of Yesterday?

Emile Zola?

Feodor Dostoevski?

The Human Comedy?

The Realist Movement in literature reflected the ethos of European society.

This was an expression of writers who sought to depict life as it really was.

Realism stressed the hereditary and environmental determinants of human behavior.

ARE YOU READY? Complete the reading Complete the study guide Review your notes Examine the material on the Blog Listen to the podcast/slidecasts Answer the questions on the podcast/slidecasts Examine any questions you missed on the quiz Scholar-up!

Complete the reading

Complete the study guide

Review your notes

Examine the material on the Blog

Listen to the podcast/slidecasts

Answer the questions on the podcast/slidecasts

Examine any questions you missed on the quiz

Scholar-up!

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