Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership: October 2016

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Information about Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership: October 2016

Published on October 14, 2016

Author: Ofstednews

Source: slideshare.net

1. Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Lorna Fitzjohn West Midlands Regional Director 14 October 2016 Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 1

2. Strategic priorities Slide 2 Improved quality, efficiency and effectiveness ensuring that inspection and regulation provide value for money Improved focus so that we target inspection and regulation where we can make the most difference Improved engagement Ensuring that we are credible, valued and trusted and do not introduce unforeseen burdens  Keeping children and young people safe  Improving education and care for the disadvantaged  Raising aspirations and better transition  Prioritising less than good with a regional focus on...

3. Changes to the inspection handbooks Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 3  The updates in the section 8 handbook are simply to make sure that it is in line with changes to statutory requirements, notably the monitoring of schools causing concern in response to the Education and Adoption Act 2016.  The minor revisions made in the section 5 handbook are mainly to reflect the latest education policy and performance measures. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ofsted-inspections-of-maintained-schools

4. Developments in education inspection Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 4 Changes to the Section 5 school inspection handbook In the section on seeking views during inspections, we have updated information about how staff and pupils are consulted during inspections to reflect the fact that the surveys are now online. In the ‘schools causing concern’ section, we have made changes to guidance on monitoring inspections of grade 4 schools to take into account the recent legislative changes and the government’s new Schools Causing Concern guidance. Under ‘what happens during the inspection’, we have clarified details about who inspectors need to meet with to inspect governance at the school.

5. Developments in education inspection… Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 5  Under ‘effectiveness of leadership and management’, we have added a reference to inspectors having consideration for governors’ development in their role as part of the effectiveness of school leadership.  In the ‘outcomes’ section, we have amended the grade descriptors to reflect changes to national assessment and accountability measures.  Linked to this, in the ‘outcomes’ section, we have also revised the guidance about inspecting the performance of disadvantaged pupils to take account of the new measures relating to pupil progress, including comparing the progress made nationally with other pupils with the same starting points.

6. Developments in education inspection… Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 6 Section 8 handbook for short, monitoring and unannounced behaviour inspections The clarification about inspecting governance and who inspectors should meet with updated in the section 5 handbook is also reflected in the updated section 8 handbook. This is to reflect responsibilities for governance in academy trusts. A minor change had been made to reflect the fact that Ofsted Inspectors (as distinct from Her Majesty’s Inspectors) may now be asked on occasion to lead section 8 ‘no formal designation’ inspections. Under ‘short inspections’, we have referred to online surveys to gather staff and pupil views.

7. Developments in education inspection… Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 7 We have made a revision to the section on Requires Improvement monitoring to reflect the government’s White Paper proposal on improvement periods for schools with new headteachers. There is a detailed update to the guidance on monitoring of schools causing concern in the light of recent legislative changes (Education and Adoption Act 2016) and the revised Schools Causing Concern statutory guidance. This includes requirements relating to statements of action for schools in categories of concern.

8. How are we doing in the West Midlands?

9. Proportion of pupils reaching the new expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics at KS2, 2016 Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 9

10. Best performing LAs at KS2 in 2016 Slide 10Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership

11. Poorest performing LAs at KS2 in 2016 Slide 11Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership

12.   KS2: % achieving new expected standard in 2016 LA Reading, writing and mathematics Reading Grammar, punctuation and spelling Mathematics Writing (teacher assessment ) England [state-funded] 52 66 72 70 73 West Midlands 49 63 71 67 70 Birmingham 45 58 70 65 66 Coventry 47 59 72 66 68 Dudley 48 61 69 66 73 Herefordshire 49 68 74 67 70 Sandwell 49 60 72 69 72 Shropshire 49 68 69 69 65 Solihull 58 70 77 72 79 Staffordshire 51 66 72 68 71 Stoke-on-Trent 45 58 67 63 69 Telford and Wrekin 55 70 77 71 73 Walsall 46 60 69 67 71 Warwickshire 57 69 74 71 77 Wolverhampton 52 63 72 69 74 Worcestershire 47 64 66 64 67 Above England Below England Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 12

13. Inspection outcomes for primary Catholic schools Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 13 Overall effectiveness 1 2 3 4 No grade Total number of schools Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership 24% 68% 7% - 1% 83 West Midlands - primary Catholic schools 20% 70% 8% - 2% 198 England - primary Catholic schools 22% 66% 9% 1% 1% 1647

14. What are the outcomes and impact we are looking for in primary education for schools in Birmingham and the Black Country?  The proportion of pupils reaching the expected standards to be at least in line with national expectations  Improved progress outcomes  Raise the achievement of disadvantaged pupils  Raise the achievement of the most able. Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 14

15. % of pupils achieving Key Stage 2 Level 4+ in reading, writing and Maths in 2015 Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 15

16. Challenges in the West Midlands  Further work is required to raise achievement in the West Midlands.  The 2016 key stage 2 provisional results show that the West Midlands has the weakest KS2 attainment. It is the joint lowest performing region nationally, alongside Yorkshire and The Humber.  Birmingham and Stoke-on-Trent (45%) were the poorest performing authorities regionally in terms of the proportion of pupils who reached the expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics. (State funded schools only) Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 16

17. Challenges in the West Midlands…  Walsall, Coventry and Worcestershire were also among the poorest 25 local authorities nationally. (State funded schools only)  Birmingham and Coventry were in the bottom 9 local authorities nationally for the proportion of pupils reaching the expected standard in the reading teacher assessments. Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 17

18. Short inspections

19. Short inspections Conducted under Section 8 of the Education Act 2005 Launched in September 2015 Short inspections for all good maintained schools and academies Short inspections also apply to good and outstanding special schools, pupil referral units and maintained nursery schools Two judgements only:  Is the school/provider still good?  Is safeguarding effective? Slide 19Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership

20. Headlines up to 31 March 2016  978 short inspections completed.  Positive feedback about the one-day short inspection model.  Positive feedback about the dialogue with HMI during the day.  Conversion rate nationally by March 2016 was 37%.  Fifty-six percent of primaries remained good or improved to outstanding after a converted short inspection, compared to 44% of secondary schools.  Some schools have improved from good to outstanding and the model of conversion has enabled us to quickly acknowledge this success. Slide 20Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership

21. How effective has the new Section 8 inspection process been? Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 21   Total No. with conversion decision Conversion rate No. with overall effectiveness judgement West Midlands 144 144 30% 43 East Midlands 164 164 28% 46 East of England 194 194 34% 65 London 189 189 39% 73 NEYH 224 224 41% 91 North West 188 188 36% 68 South East 264 264 36% 95 South West 121 121 31% 38

22. Any changes to short inspections? One of the key initiatives in the plan is for Ofsted Inspectors to begin leading short inspections. Proposals have been drafted for a pilot of these arrangements to take place in the London region during the autumn term. Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 22

23. Academies

24. Are academies having an impact? Sir Michael Wilshaw said in the Annual Report of Education, Children’s Services and Skills 2014/15: ‘As last year’s Annual Report showed, most of the sponsored academies had the greatest impact on standards in the first few years after opening. Many of these continue to perform well because their leaders have worked hard to maintain their high standards but some have declined. Overall, the best performing sponsor‑led academies are those that have been open for five years or more.’ Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 24 https://www.gov.uk/government/ collections/ofsted-annual-report- 201415

25. Are academies having an impact? Furthermore, ‘Academisation can create the conditions for remarkable improvements but structural reform can only do so much. I believe it is right to give more autonomy to the front line but we must ensure that schools have the capacity to use their freedoms effectively. Without enough good leaders and teachers, effective oversight and governance, and a concerted effort to support the most disadvantaged, we will not bring about the improvements needed.’ Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 25

26. The greatest impact is on primary schools – nearly 14,000 more primary schools may become academies Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 26 Phase Total no. of schools Current no. of academies % schools that are academies % academies that are in a MAT Number of schools to become academies by 2020/2022 Primary 16779 3066 18 71 13713 Secondary 3380 2198 65 45 1182 Special 1041 188 18 53 853 PRU 353 76 22 58 277 Nursery 406 0 0 0 0 Grand Total 21959 5528 25 60 16025

27. Inspection outcomes for primary Catholic academy schools Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 27 Overall effectiveness 1 2 3 4 Not graded Total number of schools Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership 7 7 1 -  1 16 West Midlands - primary Catholic schools  16 42 7 - 3 68 England - primary Catholic schools  81 201  28 2 18 330

28. How do we see the role of headship changing?  With the development of multi-academy trusts (MATs), the nature of leadership in schools is changing. Leadership now extends beyond headship of a school to wider roles within multi-academy trusts (e.g. school improvement role, directors of learning, CEO).  Headship is no longer restricted to one school. Headteachers play an even greater role in school improvement and may be tasked with providing support/challenge to schools identified as causing concern.  A greater focus on headteachers encouraging/developing future leaders from within the school/MAT. Headteachers identifying talent, coaching staff, and growing and developing leaders from within their own schools/MATs. Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 28

29. Challenges facing primary schools in the future?  Teacher and leader recruitment.  Continuing to raise achievement across different subjects, not just in the core subjects.  Continuing to manage the changes with the curriculum and assessment.  Ensuring good and better schools are able to sustain existing improvements while supporting other schools.  Continuing to develop the role of governors so that they are able to be strategic and ensure value for money. Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 29

30. Background: The White Paper said…  All schools to be academies by 2022.  ‘Most’ new academies to be in MATs.  A good size for a MAT is 10 to 15 schools.  Small schools to join MATs other than in ‘exceptional circumstances’. Further clarification:  Nursery schools not included in the proposals.  Small rural schools to be protected from closure. Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 30

31. Background: then in early May… ‘We absolutely support those strong local authorities where schools are good and outstanding − they can make the choice to convert.’ (Nicky Morgan) However, the government will still push forward with compelling academisation in two areas: ‘where it is clear that the local authority can no longer viably support its remaining schools because too many schools have already become academies’ ‘where the local authority consistently fails to meet a minimum performance threshold across its schools.’ An academised system through the back door? Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 31

32. Challenges in the future?  The changes Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector will bring.  How we will manage and support early years inspection and regulation from 1 April 2017 when our contracts with the Inspection Service Providers (ISPs), Prospects and Tribal, come to an end.  Ensuring we save money and target resources on the most appropriate inspection, such as schools less than good. Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 32

33. Ofsted on the web and on social media www.gov.uk/ofsted https://reports.ofsted.gov.uk www.linkedin.com/company/ofsted www.youtube.com/ofstednews www.slideshare.net/ofstednews www.twitter.com/ofstednews Birmingham Catholic Primary Partnership Slide 33

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