Awards

67 %
33 %
Information about Awards
Education

Published on April 16, 2008

Author: Urban

Source: authorstream.com

Awards and Benefits NCAA Divisions I and II:  Awards and Benefits NCAA Divisions I and II Amy Huchthausen Charnele Kemper 2007 NCAA Regional Rules Seminar Session Overview:  Session Overview Extra benefits versus preferential treatment. New legislation and interpretations. Transportation expenses for student-athletes during vacation periods. Retention of apparel/equipment. Incidental expense waivers. Session review. Extra Benefits versus Preferential Treatment:  Extra Benefits versus Preferential Treatment Definition of Extra Benefit:  Definition of Extra Benefit Any special arrangement by an institutional employee or a booster to provide a student-athlete or a student-athlete’s relative or friend a benefit not permitted by NCAA legislation (NCAA Bylaw 16.02.3). A benefit that is generally available to the student body or a segment of the student body determined on a basis unrelated to athletics ability is permissible. Extra Benefit versus Preferential Treatment:  Extra Benefit versus Preferential Treatment Provision of extra benefits involve institutional staff members or boosters. Preferential treatment occurs when institution does not have knowledge of the treatment, benefit or services being provided to the individual (Bylaw 12.1.2.1.6). 06/06/00 official interpretation, Item No. 4 (I) 09/25/00 official interpretation, Item No. 2 (II) Four-Part Test:  Four-Part Test Questions to ask: How did the relationship develop? When did the relationship develop? Did the relationship develop prior to notoriety as a skilled athlete? Was the pattern of benefits consistent? Four-Part Test:  Four-Part Test Keys: Origin of relationship. Duration of relationship. Consistency of benefits provided. Four Part Test and Logical Tie – Prospective Student-Athletes:  Four Part Test and Logical Tie – Prospective Student-Athletes Prior to enrollment, a prospect may receive benefits from an individual with whom the prospect has an established relationship. A prospect may receive normal and reasonable living expenses from an individual with whom the prospect has a logical tie (e.g., high school coach) even if the relationship developed as a result of athletics participation. Logical Tie:  Logical Tie The individual providing the living expenses to the prospect may NOT be: An agent. A booster of an institution recruiting the prospect. Living expenses must be consistent with those provided as part of normal living arrangements. How does this tie into Bylaw 16? Four-Part Test and Logical Tie – Student-Athletes:  Four-Part Test and Logical Tie – Student-Athletes Enrolled student-athletes may continue to receive occasional benefits from an individual with whom the student-athlete has an established relationship. Exception: Enrolled student-athletes may NOT receive educational expenses associated with a grant-in-aid (e.g., room and board) after enrollment. Case Study No. 1:  Case Study No. 1 Tennis student-athlete requests that his coach call the pro at student-athlete’s local tennis center in order for the student-athlete to receive free court rental during the summer. Coach arranges for student-athlete to play free of charge. Tennis center offers student discount rates for college students during the summer. Case Study No. 1:  Case Study No. 1 Would the coach’s arrangement constitute a violation? Yes, other college students are not able to play for free. If so, extra benefit or preferential treatment? Extra benefit, because of institutional staff member involvement. Would the arrangement still be a violation if coach was not involved? Yes, violation would be preferential treatment. Case Study No. 2:  Case Study No. 2 Student-athlete’s middle-school teacher has offered use of her condo for student-athlete and her family to use for spring break. Teacher provided student-athlete with occasional meals and transportation while student-athlete was in middle school and high school. Teacher has visited student-athlete at college and has taken her to dinner following home competitions. Case Study No. 2:  Case Study No. 2 Was it permissible for the teacher to provide student-athlete with meals and transportation in high school? Yes (use four-part test). Is it permissible for teacher to take student-athlete to dinner while student-athlete is enrolled? Yes, consistent benefits. Is it permissible for teacher to provide use of condo to student-athlete and her family? No, benefits not consistent. Slide16:  Division I New Legislation and Recent Interpretation Proposal No. 2006-75:  Proposal No. 2006-75 Specifies that a student-athlete who does not receive institutional athletically related financial aid covering the full cost of board, including a walk-on or partial scholarship recipient, may purchase one training-table meal per day at the same rate that the institution deducts from the board allowance of student-athletes who receive athletically related financial aid covering board costs. Effective Date: Immediate Proposal No. 2006-75 Case Study:  Proposal No. 2006-75 Case Study Normal institutional rate for dinner = $12. Rate deducted for student-athletes receiving board allowance = $7. What amount must walk-ons or partial scholarship student-athletes pay for training-table meal? $7 = Same rate used for those receiving board allowance. NCAA Proposal No. 2006-76-B:  NCAA Proposal No. 2006-76-B Permits an institution to provide an additional meal, at its discretion, to student-athletes during each day of any vacation period, including outside the academic year, provided the student-athlete is required to remain on campus for practice or competition. Effective Date: August 1, 2007 Proposal No. 2006-77:  Proposal No. 2006-77 Permits an institution to provide actual and necessary expenses for a student-athlete to participate in one national team tryout competition event per academic year (or in the following summer) from which participants are selected for the team that will participate in the Olympic Games, Pan American Games, World Championships, World Cup and World University Games. Effective Date: August 1, 2007 Proposal No. 2006-77 Q & A:  Proposal No. 2006-77 Q & A Q: How does the proposal apply to tryouts in which participation in a series of events is necessary in order to be selected to a national team? A: The institution would be permitted to provide actual and necessary expenses for only one event in a series. Proposal No. 2006-77 Case Study:  Proposal No. 2006-77 Case Study To qualify for the national team, individuals must participate in any one of three tryout events at the Y level in order to advance to Event Z. National team members will be selected from Event Z. Proposal No. 2006-77 Case Study:  Proposal No. 2006-77 Case Study For what event(s) can an institution provide expenses to a student-athlete? a. Only one event at the Y level. b. Only Event Z. c. Both one Y level event and Event Z. d. Either a or b. Answer = d. Institutions can provide expenses to ONE national team tryout event. If there are a series of events, discretion to select the single event for provision of expenses. September 27, 2006 Official Interpretation :  September 27, 2006 Official Interpretation Cash in Lieu of Meals in Conjunction with Home Competition It is not permissible to provide cash to student-athletes in lieu of discretionary meals (except for $10 in lieu of a meal following the competition) in conjunction with a home athletics contest. Following a home competition, regardless of the timing in which student-athletes are released by the appropriate institutional authority, an institution may provide only one meal or $10 in lieu of that meal. September 27, 2006 Official Interpretation Case Study:  September 27, 2006 Official Interpretation Case Study Team reports on call for home contest at 11 a.m. Contest starts at 3 p.m. Contest ends at 6:30 p.m. Team is released at 7:30 p.m. Between 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m., what can an institution provide? a. Meals only b. Meals plus $10 (in lieu of one meal) Answer = A. When a student-athlete reports on call until the end of the contest, institutions may provide meals but not cash in lieu of meals. September 27, 2006 Official Interpretation Case Study:  September 27, 2006 Official Interpretation Case Study When may the institution provide $10 cash (in lieu of a meal) to student-athletes? a. When the contest ends at 6:30 p.m. b. When the student-athletes are released at 7:30 p.m. Answer = A. Institution can provide either the actual meal or $10 (in lieu of the meal) following the contest, regardless of when the student-athletes are released. Slide28:  Division II New Legislation 2007 NCAA Convention Division II Proposal No. NC-30:  2007 NCAA Convention Division II Proposal No. NC-30 Permits an institution to provide expenses for a student-athlete to attend one qualifying competition event per academic year for the Olympic, Pan American, World Championships, World Cup and World University Games. Effective Date: Immediate Team Transportation During Vacation Periods:  Team Transportation During Vacation Periods Team Transportation – Regular Season During a Vacation Period:  Team Transportation – Regular Season During a Vacation Period General Rule: Institution may provide team transportation for a student-athlete to travel from campus to event site and back to campus. Exception: Student-Athlete Travels to Site Other Than Event Site:  Exception: Student-Athlete Travels to Site Other Than Event Site If student-athlete travels to site other than event site, institution may provide the round-trip cost of transportation from campus to event site and back to campus. Student-athlete is responsible for any additional cost of traveling to site other than event site. Case Study No. 1:  Case Study No. 1 Women’s basketball team is flying from campus to Miami for a regular-season competition December 22 and returning to campus December 23. Student-athlete would like to fly home (Detroit) after the game December 23 and return to campus December 26. The cost of the round-trip fare from campus to Miami is $300. The cost of the airfare from campus to Miami to Detroit and back to campus is $400. Case Study No. 1:  Case Study No. 1 What expenses can the institution provide to the student-athlete? Institution may provide $300 towards student-athlete’s trip. Student-athlete is responsible for paying $100. NCAA Championships/Bowl Games/National Governing Body Championships (Emerging Sports) During Vacation Period:  NCAA Championships/Bowl Games/National Governing Body Championships (Emerging Sports) During Vacation Period General Rule: Institution may provide team transportation for a student-athlete to travel from campus to the site of an NCAA championship, National Governing Body championship in an emerging sport or a postseason bowl game and back to campus. Exception: Student-Athlete Does Not Use Team Transportation:  Exception: Student-Athlete Does Not Use Team Transportation If the student-athlete does not use any team transportation during the vacation period, the institution may provide the greater of these costs: Campus to the event site back to campus; Campus to the student-athlete’s home and back to campus; or The student-athlete’s home to the event site and back home. In Division II, student-athlete must go home during vacation period to receive expenses. [Reference: 5/24/00 staff confirmation] Exception: Student-Athlete Does Not Use Team Transportation:  Exception: Student-Athlete Does Not Use Team Transportation Exception: Student-Athlete Uses “Leg” of Team Transportation:  Exception: Student-Athlete Uses “Leg” of Team Transportation Institution may provide the greater of these costs minus the value of the transportation cost of that “leg”: Campus to the event site back to campus; Campus to the student-athlete’s home and back to campus; or The student-athlete’s home to the event site and back home. Must use one-half of the airline’s actual round-trip coach airfare in order to determine value of one leg of transportation, not actual value of leg (Reference: 12/5/90 staff confirmation). In Division II, student-athlete must go home to receive transportation expenses. Exception: Student-Athlete Uses “Leg” of Team Transportation:  Exception: Student-Athlete Uses “Leg” of Team Transportation Value of “leg” of transportation provided Exception: Second Trip Home:  Exception: Second Trip Home If the student-athlete uses team transportation from or Participates in the institution’s home community and during that period has personally paid for a round trip from The institution may pay for a second trip home. Case Study No. 1:  Case Study No. 1 What can the institution provide to the student-athlete? Slide43:  Use general rule or exception? Exception. What exception? Student-athlete uses one leg of transportation exception. What formula? Greater of three costs – minus one-half of round-trip value of what institution provides What amount can institution provide to student-athlete? $1200 - $450 = $750 Slide45:  Retention of Athletics Equipment and Apparel Legislation Summary (Division I/Division II):  Legislation Summary (Division I/Division II) May provide student-athletes with actual and necessary apparel and equipment for practice and competition. Student-athletes may keep apparel items (not equipment) at the end of their collegiate participation. Student-athletes may keep apparel and shoes if no longer reusable at the end of the season. Used equipment may be purchased on the same cost basis as any other individual. Equipment must be purchased at market value. Division I and II Hot Topic – September 28, 2006 :  Division I and II Hot Topic – September 28, 2006 Institution can negotiate discounted rate. If required for participation, student-athletes can purchase at discounted rate directly from manufacturer. Purchased items are not property of student-athletes (e.g., issue/retrieval). Student-athlete may have to provide additional funds in order to keep the items. Case Study:  Case Study Grace College does not provide its golf team with golf clubs. Grace College negotiated a deal with Tin Cup, a golf equipment company, where student-athlete may purchase golf clubs at 50 percent off normal retail cost. Case Study – Question No. 1:  Case Study – Question No. 1 May student-athletes purchase golf clubs from Tin Cup at the reduced rate? Yes. It is permissible for student-athletes to purchase golf clubs at the reduced rate because Grace College does not provide student-athletes with the equipment and it is necessary for practice and competition. Case Study:  Case Study Christina purchases golf clubs for $500 (retail cost = $1,000) using the negotiated rate with Tin Cup and uses them during the season. The market value of the clubs at the end of the season is $300. Christina would like to keep the clubs at the end of the year. Case Study – Question No. 2:  Case Study – Question No. 2 May Christina keep the golf clubs she purchased at the end of the year? Yes. Student-athletes may keep the golf clubs if the market value is less than the initial purchase price paid by the student-athlete. (Market) $300 < $500 (Initial) Case Study:  Case Study Meredith, Christina’s teammate, only needs to purchase a sand wedge. Meredith purchases a sand wedge from Tin Cup for $70 (retail cost = $140). The market value of Meredith’s sand wedge at the end of the season is $80. Meredith would like to keep her sand wedge at the end of the year. Case Study – Question No. 3:  Case Study – Question No. 3 May Meredith keep the sand wedge at the end of the year? No, because the initial purchase price is less than the market value ($70 < $80). If Meredith wants to keep the wedge, she must first pay the difference ($10). Incidental Expense Waivers:  Incidental Expense Waivers Incidental Expense Waivers:  Incidental Expense Waivers What is an incidental expense waiver? Must be for an enrolled student-athlete or student-athlete’s family member. Must be considered incidental to student-athlete’s participation in intercollegiate athletics. Expenses must be provided from an NCAA institution or conference. Incidental Expense Waivers:  Incidental Expense Waivers All previously approved waivers can be processed on campus (Bylaw 16.12.1.1). Search interpretations on LSDBi, using Bylaw 16.12.1 and keywords. Division I - 4/29/02 educational column. Division II – 2/3/00 educational column. Waivers approved prior to August 1, 1997 are applicable to all divisions. If precedent not on point, submit request to membership services. Incidental Expense Waivers:  Incidental Expense Waivers Waiver requests should be directed to Charnele Kemper. Must be submitted on institutional letterhead (no application form). A brief explanation of facts regarding the request and cost, if known. Staff will approve waiver or forward the request to appropriate Administrative Committee of the Management Council. Review:  Review Definitions of extra benefits and preferential treatment. New legislation for Division I and Division II. Team transportation during vacation periods. Retention of apparel/equipment. Processing incidental expense waivers. Questions?:  Questions?

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Awwwards - Website Awards - Best Web Design Trends

Awwwards are the Website Awards that recognize and promote the talent and effort of the best developers, designers and web agencies in the world.
Read more

Awards.com - Custom Awards & Recognition Trophies & Plaques

Largest selection of custom recognition awards. Affordable employee awards for service & sales achievements from crystal & acrylic trophies & plaques.
Read more

The Oscars 2016 | 88th Academy Awards

Get the latest news about the 2016 Oscars, including nominations, winners, predictions and red carpet fashion at 88th Academy Awards Oscar.com.
Read more

AWARDS - FAMAB e. V.

Der FAMAB AWARD zeichnet herausragende Markenerlebnisse aus, prämiert internationale Benchmarks in der Begegnungskommunikation sowie in der temporären ...
Read more

Awards - GoPro Official Website - Capture + share your world

Halte deine Interessen, deine Leidenschaft und dein Leben fest ... mit einer GoPro. Schicke uns deine besten Fotos, unbearbeiteten Clips und ...
Read more

Marketing Intelligence and Innovation Awards

Die Marketing Intelligence and Innovation Awards 2016 werden veranstaltet von
Read more

Darwin Award – Wikipedia

Wendy Northcutt: Neue Darwin Awards. Goldmann 2003, ISBN 3-442-45376-3. Wendy Northcutt: Neueste Darwin Awards. Goldmann 2005, ISBN 3-442-45881-1.
Read more

Messe Friedrichshafen - Award: EUROBIKE AWARD

Mit 472 Produkteinreichungen in 10 Kategorien und 51 vergebenen EUROBIKE AWARDs – darunter 12 GOLD sowie ein GREEN AWARD – blicken wir auf eine weitere ...
Read more

GRAMMY.com | The Official Site of Music's Biggest Night

Latin GRAMMY Awards; News; Photos; Videos; Press; Sponsors; Store; GRAMMY.org; ... These are the most read, shared and discussed articles on GRAMMY.com ...
Read more

AWARDdesign – Individuelle Awards, Trophäen, Tombstones ...

Wir entwerfen und produzieren individuelle Awards, Trophäen, Tombstones, Pokale sowie Auszeichnungen und Präsente.
Read more