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Atmosphere, Layers of the Atmosphere, Weather and Climate Earth Science Lesson PowerPoint

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Information about Atmosphere, Layers of the Atmosphere, Weather and Climate Earth Science...
Education

Published on August 25, 2013

Author: sciencepowerpointcom

Source: slideshare.net

Description

This PowerPoint is one small part of the Weather and Climate unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 2500+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 14 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 19 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus within The Weather and Climate Unit: -What is weather?, Climate, Importance of the Atmosphere, Components of the Atmosphere, Layers of the Atmosphere, Air Quality and Pollution, Carbon Monoxide, Ozone Layer, Ways to Avoid Skin Cancer, Air Pressure, Barometer, Air Pressure and Wind, Fronts, Wind, Global Wind, Coriolis Force, Jet Stream, Sea Breeze / Land Breeze, Mountain Winds, Mountain Rain Shadow, Wind Chill, Flight, Dangerous Weather Systems, Light, Albedo, Temperature, Thermometers, Seasons, Humidity / Condensation / Evaporation, Dew Points, Clouds, Types of Clouds, Meteorology, Weather Tools, Isotherms, Ocean Currents, Enhanced Global Warming, Greenhouse Effect, The Effects of Global Warming, Biomes, Types of Biomes. Difficulty rating 8/10.

This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
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• The sky is blue because Nitrogen gas N2 and Oxygen Gas O2 are almost the same size (small). This scatters the blue light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

-Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn.

• RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This Unit belongs to Ryan Murphy Copyright 2010 and can be found at www.sciencepowerpoint.com

 Weather: The state of the atmosphere at a given time and place, with respect to variables such as…  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Temperature Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Moisture Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Wind Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Air Pressure Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Climate: The average weather of a particular part of the world at different times of the year. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Climate: The average weather of a particular part of the world at different times of the year. (Longer periods of time) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Climate: The average weather of a particular part of the world at different times of the year. (Longer periods of time) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Climate: The average weather of a particular part of the world at different times of the year. (Longer periods of time) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Climate: The average weather of a particular part of the world at different times of the year. (Longer periods of time) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Video Link! (Optional) Namibia before and after a rain event. • Visit this address if link won’t work. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-oIUDL2frc • Title: Namibia in the Rain

• Video Link! Difference between weather and climate. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1s8eGd7THoo

• Think about the perfect outdoor wedding for a minute.

• Think about the perfect outdoor wedding for a minute.

“Weather is what you get.”

“Weather is what you get.” “Climate is what you expect.”

• April 21st,.. – What is the climate of Florida? – What is the climate of Arizona? – What is climate of Alaska? – What is the climate of Kenya? – What is the climate in Saudi Arabia? – What is the climate in the United Kingdom? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Summer

• The Atmosphere: A starting point

• This thin layer is our atmosphere.

 Atmosphere: The layer of gases surrounding Earth; composed mainly of nitrogen and oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Atmosphere: The layer of gases surrounding Earth; composed mainly of nitrogen and oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Atmos – vapor Sphairia - ball Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Atmos – vapor Sphairia - ball Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Atmos – vapor Sphairia - ball Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The atmosphere is like the fog from a breath on an apple. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Use a Petri-dish to draw a circle and then draw the thinnest possible line around it without touching the circle? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Label this thin circle as the atmosphere. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Label this thin circle as the atmosphere. Atmosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Label this thin circle as the atmosphere. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Label this thin circle as the atmosphere. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy No Atmosphere

 Importance of the atmosphere  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Keeps planet warm (Greenhouse Effect) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The Moon does not have an atmosphere

• The Moon does not have an atmosphere and is extremely cold in the shade,

• The Moon does not have an atmosphere and is extremely cold in the shade, and extremely hot in the sun.

• What’s so special about this photo? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! Water exists in all three forms of matter because of our greenhouse effect. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! Water exists in all three forms of matter because of our greenhouse effect. – Solid, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! Water exists in all three forms of matter because of our greenhouse effect. – Solid, liquid, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! Water exists in all three forms of matter because of our greenhouse effect. – Solid, liquid, gas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Provides oxygen to breathe  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Provides oxygen to breathe  Makes respiration possible. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Provides oxygen to breathe  Makes respiration possible. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Provides oxygen to breathe  Makes respiration possible. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Protects us from small meteors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Has ozone that protects us from radiation (UV). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What’s not scientifically accurate about your stereotypical space battle? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Video Link! Stereotypical Space Battle. – Teacher will play and periodically mute the volume to make it slightly more accurate. • Reactions to the video without sound? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2x3Q1ZkDIos &feature=related

• Video Link! Stereotypical Space Battle. – Teacher will play and periodically mute the volume to make it slightly more accurate. • Reactions to the video without sound? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2x3Q1ZkDIos &feature=related Video Link! (Optional) Reality. 9 minute single maneuver of Space Shuttle Atlantis preparing for docking with ISS. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RSnOiMVfHk

• Answer! – There is no sound. – Fire cannot burn without oxygen. – The ships can’t bank turns because space is a vacuum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! – There is no sound. – Fire cannot burn without oxygen. – The ships can’t bank turns because space is a vacuum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! – There is no sound. – Fire cannot burn without oxygen. – The ships can’t bank turns because space is a vacuum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! – There is no sound. – Fire cannot burn without oxygen. – The ships can’t bank turns because space is a vacuum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! – There is no sound. – Fire cannot burn without oxygen. – The ships can’t bank turns because space is a vacuum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! – There is no sound. – Fire cannot burn without oxygen. – The ships can’t bank turns because space is a vacuum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Without atmosphere, smell, taste, sound, and combustion are not possible. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! History of the atmosphere. – 9 boxes equaling a half page required. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy History and structure of atmosphere. Learn more at… http://www.ux1.eiu.edu/~cfjps/1400/atmos_origin.html

H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Tic-Tac-Toe vs. Teacher. – On next slide teacher will minimize out the slideshow. – Students (X) go first. – Students must verbally read the square before putting (X) in it. – Teacher must read the square as well.

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy - - - - - - - - -

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy - - - - - - - - -

1st atmosphere H and He from solar nebula Lost to solar wind 2nd atmosphere H20, CO2 and SO2 from From Volcanoes Transformed by photosynthesis Current atmosphere N2, O2, from photosynthesis and constant N2 production Nitrogen fixing + continued photosynthesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy - - - - - - - - -

• Video Link! (Optional) Hank explains the history of climate. – Preview for language. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dC_2WXyORGA

 Combustion: A process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Combustion: A process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Combustion: A process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Combustion: A process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Combustion: A process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Combustion: A process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Combustion: A process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Combustion: A process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What goes in? What comes out? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Weather and Climate Available Sheet – Due at the end of Part I as class work.

• If candles are burning, they must be using oxygen for combustion.

• If a jar is placed over a candle what will happen to the candle?

• If a jar is placed over a candle what will happen to the candle?

• If a jar is placed over a candle what will happen to the candle?

• If a jar is placed over a candle what will happen to the candle? Why?

• If a jar is placed over a candle what will happen to the candle? Why? The flame went out because during combustion all of the oxygen gas in the jar was used (chemical reaction).

• Record this spreadsheet in your journal to help you with your prediction. Large Medium Small Volume of the container / Size ? Seconds for the flame to go out ?

• Activity! Predict how long the candle in the medium sized jar will burn when a glass is placed over it based on the amount of air inside. – Record the volume and time for the small and large. 1st 2nd 3rd

• Activity! (Optional) – Light candle directly behind box (non-flammable material) and try and blow out candle.

• Activity! (Optional) – Light candle directly behind tube / round container of about equal thickness (non- flammable material) and try and blow out candle.

• Activity! (Optional) – Light candle directly behind tube / round container of about equal thickness (non- flammable material) and try and blow out candle.

• Activity! (Optional) – Light candle directly behind tube / round container of about equal thickness (non- flammable material) and try and blow out candle.

• What happened? Why? – The air tended to stick to the curved surface of the bottle. This is called the Coanda effect.

 The atmosphere is made of  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 78% Nitrogen Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 21% Oxygen Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Why is the sky blue? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Optional. Why is the sky blue? – Add water to a very clear container. – Keep adding very small amounts of milk using a flashlight in the dark until the sky is blue. – Change your angles with flashlight to make sunsets. – http://www.csiro.au/resources/blue-sky-activity

• The sky is blue because Nitrogen gas N2 and Oxygen Gas O2 are almost the same size (small). This scatters the blue light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The sky is blue because Nitrogen gas N2 and Oxygen Gas O2 are almost the same size (small). This scatters the blue light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The sky is blue because Nitrogen gas N2 and Oxygen Gas O2 are almost the same size (small). This scatters the blue light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The sky is blue because… – Nitrogen and Oxygen are small atoms. – Red light (long wavelength) from the sun passes by Nitrogen and Oxygen without hitting them. – Blue light (shorter wavelength) hits Nitrogen and Oxygen and is scattered. – You see this blue. – It’s a bit more complicated than this but hopefully you get the idea. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Shorter wave-lengths longer wave-lengths Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Shorter wave-lengths longer wave-lengths Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Shorter wave-lengths longer wave-lengths Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Shorter wave-lengths longer wave-lengths Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more why the sky is blue at… http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/sky_blue.html

• Which letter represents the blue light that we see, and which represents the red light? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! B represents the smaller wave length of light scattering off of N2 and O2. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Why then, are sunsets red, yellow, and orange? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! The sun is not directly overhead and passes across the atmosphere. – The blue light is scattered out, leaving the longer reds, oranges, and yellows. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! The sun is not directly overhead and passes across the atmosphere. – The blue light is scattered out, leaving the longer reds, oranges, and yellows. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! The sun is not directly overhead and passes across the atmosphere. – The blue light is scattered out, leaving the longer reds, oranges, and yellows. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which letter represents the light that we see during a sunset? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which letter represents the light that we see during a sunset? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 All other gases 1%  Argon .7%  Carbon Dioxide .2%  Neon  Helium  Methane  Krypton  Hydrogen  Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 All other gases 1%  *Argon  Carbon Dioxide .2%  Neon  Helium  Methane  Krypton  Hydrogen  Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 All other gases 1%  *Argon  *Carbon Dioxide  Neon  Helium  Methane  Krypton  Hydrogen  Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 All other gases 1%  *Argon  *Carbon Dioxide  Neon  Helium  Methane  Krypton  Hydrogen  Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 All other gases 1%  *Argon  *Carbon Dioxide  Neon  Helium  Methane  Krypton  Hydrogen  Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 All other gases 1%  *Argon  *Carbon Dioxide  Neon  Helium  Methane  Krypton  Hydrogen  Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 All other gases 1%  *Argon  *Carbon Dioxide  Neon  Helium  Methane  Krypton  Hydrogen  Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 All other gases 1%  *Argon  *Carbon Dioxide  Neon  Helium  Methane  Krypton  Hydrogen  Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 All other gases 1%  *Argon  *Carbon Dioxide  Neon  Helium  Methane  Krypton  Hydrogen  Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Argon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Argon Neon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Argon Neon Krypton Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Argon Neon Krypton Xenon Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Argon Neon Krypton Xenon CH4 Methane Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Argon Neon Krypton Xenon CH4 Methane Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Argon Neon Krypton Xenon CH4 Methane Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Helium

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Argon Neon Krypton Xenon CH4 Methane Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Helium

• What are these? When all are identified we can move on. N2 Nitrogen Gas O2 Oxygen CO2 Carbon Dioxide Argon Neon Krypton Xenon CH4 Methane Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Helium Hydrogen

• Weather and Climate Available Sheet – Due at the end of Part I as class work.

• Activity! Please create a pie graph in your journal by hand of the atmospheres composition. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Composition of the atmosphere. Learn more at… http://ossfoundation.us/projects/environment/global -warming/atmospheric-composition

 Title: Layers of the Atmosphere  Spread these 5 bullets out over a page. Draw relevant things after titling layer.-  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Caution! Notes are going from the top up and not top down.

• Caution! Notes are going from the top up and not top down.

 Title: Layers of the Atmosphere  Spread these 5 bullets out over a page. Draw relevant things after titling layer.-  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Title: Layers of the Atmosphere  Spread these 5 bullets out over a page. Draw relevant things after titling layer.-  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Title: Layers of the Atmosphere  Spread these 5 bullets out over a page. Draw relevant things after titling layer.-  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Layers determined by temperature

 Title: Layers of the Atmosphere  Spread these 5 bullets out over a page. Draw relevant things after titling layer.-  -  -  -  -  - Troposphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Layers determined by temperature

Troposphere: Weather occurs here. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Troposphere: Weather occurs here. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Troposphere: Weather occurs here. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Stratosphere: Ozone found here. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Video Link! (Optional) Felix Baumgartner's supersonic freefall from 128k' - Mission Highlights / Red Bull Ad. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RR-tzGOyi0

 Mesosphere: Meteors burn up here Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Thermosphere: Space shuttle orbited here, Aurora borealis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Thermosphere: Space shuttle orbited here, Aurora borealis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Term Ionosphere is region where solar radiation is Ionized, Thermo, Meso, and Exosphere

 Exosphere: Merges with space, some satellites can be found here. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Exosphere: Merges with space, some satellites can be found here. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Layers of the atmosphere. Learn more at… http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jetstream/atmos/layers.htm

• What objects are found in layers of the atmosphere challenge. – http://calipsooutreach.hamptonu.edu/atmosphe re.swf

• Activity! Next Slide. Students to move the pictures into the correct layer of the atmosphere. – Teacher minimizes out of slideshow and controls movements with computer.

Exosphere Thermosphere Mesosphere Stratosphere Troposphere

Exosphere Thermosphere Mesosphere Stratosphere Troposphere

Exosphere Thermosphere Mesosphere Stratosphere Troposphere Answers

• Practice before the quiz!

• Practice before the quiz!

• Practice before the quiz!

• Practice before the quiz!

• Practice before the quiz!

• Practice before the quiz!

• Practice before the quiz!

• Practice before the quiz!

• Practice before the quiz!

• Practice before the quiz! Layers of the atmosphere. Learn more at… http://www.windows2universe.org/earth/Atmosph ere/layers.html

• Weather and Climate Available Sheet – Due at the end of Part I as class work.

• Quiz 1-5 Name the layer of the atmosphere. • Word Bank: Stratosphere, Troposphere, Mesosphere, Th ermosphere, Exosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Bonus – What dog is this flying through the Lower Troposphere?

• Quiz 1-5 Name the layer of the atmosphere. • Word Bank: Stratosphere, Troposphere, Mesosphere, Thermosphere, Exosphere Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

3

Term Ionosphere is region where solar radiation is Ionized, Thermo, Meso, and Exosphere

• Bonus – What dog is this flying through the Lower Troposphere?

• Bonus – What dog is this flying through the Lower Troposphere?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Now draw with a red line the temperatures of the layers of atmosphere over your notes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Caution! Read the next slide from the bottom up. – Not from the top down!

• Caution! Read the next slide from the bottom up. – Not from the top down!

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very hot in space when sun hits you. • Gets colder again with few air molecules as you go toward space • Gets warmer in stratosphere because sun’s radiation is strong because not blocked out. • As you go up Mt. Everest there is less air particles so it gets colder. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which colored line represents the correct temperature swings? Cold Hot

• Which colored line represents the correct temperature swings? Cold Hot

• Which colored line represents the correct temperature swings? Cold Hot

• Which colored line represents the correct temperature swings? Cold Hot

• Which colored line represents the correct temperature swings? Cold Hot

• Which colored line represents the correct temperature swings? Cold Hot

• Which colored line represents the correct temperature swings? Cold Hot

• Which colored line represents the correct temperature swings? Answer… Cold Hot

• Which colored line represents the correct temperature swings? Answer… Lime Green Cold Hot

• Take the on-line quiz as a class about the atmosphere at…. – http://sunshine.chpc.utah.edu/labs/atmosphere/ozone/at m_layers_questions.swf

• Video Link! Layers of the Atmosphere Song. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQPyNY2WI dw

http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:

Areas of Focus within The Weather and Climate Unit: What is weather?, Climate, Importance of the Atmosphere, Components of the Atmosphere, Layers of the Atmosphere, Air Quality and Pollution, Carbon Monoxide, Ozone Layer, Ways to Avoid Skin Cancer, Air Pressure, Barometer, Air Pressure and Wind, Fronts, Wind, Global Wind, Coriolis Force, Jet Stream, Sea Breeze / Land Breeze, Mountain Winds, Mountain Rain Shadow, Wind Chill, Flight, Dangerous Weather Systems, Light, Albedo, Temperature, Thermometers, Seasons, Humidity / Water, Oceans, Roles of Oceans, El Nino, La Nina Cycle, Dew Points, Clouds, Types of Clouds, Meteorology, Weather Tools, Isotherms, Ocean Currents, Enhanced Global Warming, Greenhouse Effect, The Effects of Global Warming, Biomes, Types of Biomes. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit. html

• This PowerPoint is one small part of my Weather and Climate Unit. This unit includes… – A 5 part 2,500+ PowerPoint roadmap. – 16 page bundled homework and modified version that follows slideshow + answers. – 19 pages of unit notes with visuals – 25+ video links, two PowerPoint review games, rubrics, materials, list, curriculum guide, and much more. – http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_ Unit.html

• Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade

Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html

• The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:

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