ASAHPERD PPP

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Information about ASAHPERD PPP
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Published on November 27, 2007

Author: Crystal

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Every Child Deserves a Comprehensive Education: Physical Education is Essential :  Every Child Deserves a Comprehensive Education: Physical Education is Essential Alabama State Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance WHO IS ASAHPERD? :  WHO IS ASAHPERD? ALABAMA STATE ASSOCIATION FOR HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION RECREATION AND DANCE 1250 Members including teachers, coaches, trainers, future teachers, exercise scientists, recreation and dance educators, etc. OUR VISION::  OUR VISION: ASAHPERD envisions all citizens in Alabama to have the opportunity to enjoy a quality life through knowledge and active participation in healthy lifestyle choices. OUR MISSION::  OUR MISSION: ASAHPERD’s Mission is to promote and support healthy lifestyles of Alabama citizens through high quality programs in health, physical education, recreation, dance, sport and exercise science. We will Accomplish our Mission By::  We will Accomplish our Mission By: providing opportunities for professional growth and development; communicating the importance and value of our profession; encouraging and facilitating research findings to the profession and to the public; developing and evaluating standards and guidelines within the profession; and advocating for quality instruction by working with policymakers across the state. Current ASAHPERD Advocacy Issues::  Current ASAHPERD Advocacy Issues: SDE Student Health Task Force Eliminating exemptions from physical education in K-8 and reducing exemptions in high school. Reducing Student/Teacher Ratio in physical education classes. Funding for certified physical education teachers in every elementary school. Adding physical education monitoring to the SDE monitoring system. Advocacy Issues Continued::  Advocacy Issues Continued: Providing training for teachers and administrators to implement the Course of Study. Developing an assessment manual to address fitness testing as well as other assessment standards for physical education. Encouraging more physical activity opportunities for K-12 students before, during and after school. Encouraging schools to provide a healthy nutritional environment for all students during school meals, in vending machines and in school stores. Important Facts::  Important Facts: Even though, Alabama requires physical education daily in K-8 schools: Only 80%* of students in K-8 actually take physical education classes. The number of students in K-8 not taking physical education is 106,373*. Only 33%* of students in grades 9-12 take physical education. *According to SDE 2003-2004 Enrollment Data Important Facts::  Important Facts: Alabama has the second highest percentage of obese adults in the United States (Trust for America’s Health, 2005). According to the report F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies are Failing in America, 2005, 27.7 % of adults in Alabama are obese. An additional 35.8% of adults are overweight (Trust for America’s Health, 2005). Age-adjusted death rate rankings for diseases related to obesity in Alabama are among the highest in the nation: 5th for heart disease, 7th for stroke, and 10th for diabetes (ADPH, 2003). Important Facts::  Important Facts: According to the American Heart Association, “For the first time in history, children’s life spans are predicted to be less than their parents because of inactivity and obesity-related illnesses.” Important Facts::  Important Facts: Overweight children experience higher rates of physical, social and mental health problems than children who are not overweight. Overweight children and teens may experience health problems such as asthma, type 2 diabetes, sleep apnea, hypertension and orthopedic problems, depression and low self-esteem. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Slide29:  Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% Slide30:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% Slide31:  Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) Slide32:  1996 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991, 1996, 2004 (*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% 2004 Goals 2000: Educate America Act:  Goals 2000: Educate America Act Focuses on reform of PK-12 education Standards to define what students “should know and be able to do” Physical education is not included in “core” but are included in the final bill as areas that “all children should have” No Child Left Behind (2001) Elementary and Secondary Education Act :  No Child Left Behind (2001) Elementary and Secondary Education Act Identifies “core” subjects Physical education is not identified Focus on testing Reading Math Slide35:  Education is a responsibility granted to the states by the Constitution of the United States Standards-Based Curricula:  Standards-Based Curricula National Standards for Physical Education State Standards for Physical Education Define what students should know and be able to do as a result of quality physical education. Overall Goal of Physical Education:  Overall Goal of Physical Education To assist each student in becoming a “physically educated person”. Definition of a Physically Educated Person:  Definition of a Physically Educated Person HAS learned skills necessary to perform a variety of physical activities IS physically fit DOES participate regularly in physical activity KNOWS the implications of and the benefits from involvement in physical activities VALUES physical activity and its contribution to a healthful lifestyle Elements of Quality Physical Education:  Elements of Quality Physical Education Opportunity to learn Qualified and certified teachers Adequate time Meaningful content National/state standards for physical education Appropriate instruction Formative and summative assessment Percentage of Adults and Teens Who Believe that Daily Physical Education Should be Mandatory:  Percentage of Adults and Teens Who Believe that Daily Physical Education Should be Mandatory Parents Views’ of Children’s Health and Fitness (2002). NASPE Survey conducted by Opinion Research Corp. Int., Princeton, NJ. What’s Best for Our Children:  What’s Best for Our Children Children deserve a comprehensive education Schools need to educate the whole child Physical education is critical to a complete education Fit, healthy children learn better A Call to Action: Your Support Can Make the Difference:  A Call to Action: Your Support Can Make the Difference Now is the time to communicate with your policymakers. Educate as many people as possible on the importance of quality physical education programs. Be a daily advocate for the health and wellness. For More Information, Contact::  For More Information, Contact: ASAHPERD Sandra Sims President 2006-2007 sksims@uab.edu 205-996-2721 205-999-9982

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