Art 3101 Powerpoint Two

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Published on November 1, 2007

Author: Charlo

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Art 3101 Powerpoint Two:  Art 3101 Powerpoint Two Powerpoint Presentation Two Dr. David Ludley Slide2:  William Wegman, “On Set” 1994 Color Polaroid, 24 x 20 inches © 2005 William Wegman Courtesy the Artist Slide3:  William Wegman, “Canon Aside,” diptych 2000 Color Polaroid, 24 x 20 inches Top image of vertical diptych © 2005 William Wegman Courtesy the Artist Slide4:  William Wegman, “Miss Mit” 1993 Color Polaroid, 24 x 20 inches © 2005 William Wegman Courtesy the Artist Slide5:  William Wegman, “Stepmother” 1992 Color Polaroid, 24 x 20 inches © 2005 William Wegman Courtesy the Artist Slide6:  Bruce Nauman, “One Hun- dred Live and Die” 1984 Neon tubing mounted on four metal monoliths, 118 x 132 1/4 x 21 inches Collection Fukake Publishing Co., Ltd., Naoshima Contemporary Art Museum, Kagawa, Japan Courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York, © Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. "I'm surprised when the work appears beautiful, and very pleased. And I think work can be very good and very successful without being able to call it beautiful, although I'm not clear about that. The work is good when it has a certain completeness, and when it's got a certain completeness, then it's beautiful."— Bruce Nauman Slide7:  Bruce Nauman, “Violins Violence Silence” 1981-1982 Neon tubing with clear glass tubing suspension frame, 60 1/2 x 66 1/2 x 6 inches Oliver-Hoffmann Family Collection, Chicago Courtesy Leo Castelli Gallery, New York, © Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Slide8:  Bruce Nauman,“Room with My Soul Left Out, Room That Does Not Care” 1984, Celotex, steel grate, yellow lights, 408 x 576 x 366 Flick Collection. Courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York, © Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York "[Living in New Mexico] lets me do the kinds of things outside that I couldn't do if I lived in town, in the city...it helps me to have a sense of place and security to go in the studio, because that's the place where you make yourself insecure.“ — Bruce Nauman Slide9:  Bruce Nauman, “Vices and Virtues,” installation views, 1983-1988 Neon tubing and clear glass tubing, mounted on aluminum support grid, height 84 Inches.The Stuart Collection, University of California, San Diego. Purchase with funds from the Staurt Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York, © Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Slide10:  Bruce Nauman, “Good Boy, Bad Boy,” details,1985. Two color video monitors, two videotape players, two videotapes (color, sound), dimensions variable. Edition of 40. Courtesy Donald Young Gallery, Chicago, © Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York "There wasn't a specific duration...this thing can just repeat and repeat and repeat, and you don't have to sit and watch the whole thing. You can watch for a while, leave and go have lunch or come back in a week, and it's just going on. And I really liked that idea of the thing just being there. The idea being there so that it became almost like an object that was there, that you could go back and visit whenever you wanted to."— Bruce Nauman Slide11:  Bruce Nauman,“Clown Torture,” installation view,1987 Four color video monitors, four speakers, four videotape players, two video projectors, four videotapes (color, sound), dimensions variable. Courtesy Donald Young Gallery, Chicago, © Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Slide12:  Kerry James Marshall, "Better Homes Better Gardens“ 1994. Acrylic and collage on unstretched canvas, 100 x 142 inches. Denver Art Museum, Special Fund. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. "The subject matter seems in some ways less dramatic than the kinds of subjects represented in traditional history painting. But that's also a part of what the painting is about. It's about those figures being represented that way: the relationship between this representation of figures and the absence of those kinds of representations in that historical tradition of grand narrative history painting."— Kerry James Marshall Slide13:  Kerry James Marshall, "Many Mansions“ 1994. Acrylic and collage on unstretched canvas, 114 x 135 inches. Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. "The painting is built around what you could call a very classically Renaissance, architectural, or geometric structure. The most obvious thing you can see is this pyramidal, triangulated structure that the figures are fitted into...One of the reasons I used that structure was because when I started out the artists and works that I really admired—like Géricault's 'The [Raft] of the Medusa'—that whole genre of history painting, that grand narrative style of painting, was something that I really wanted to position my work in relation to. And so in order to achieve a similar kind of authority that those paintings had... I had to adopt the similar structural format to develop my painting."— Kerry James Marshall Slide14:  Kerry James Marshall, “Untitled (Altgeld Gardens)” 1995. Acrylic and collage on can- vas, 78 1/2 x 103 inches. Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, KS Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. "The initial development of that unequivocally black, emphatically black figure was so that I would use them as figures that function rhetorically in the painting...And one of the things that I had been thinking about when I started to develop that figure was the way in which the folk and folklore pf blackness always seemed to carry a derogatory connotation...A part of what I was thinking to do with my image was to reclaim the images of blackness as an emblem of power, instead of an image of derision.“ — Kerry James Marshall Slide15:  Kerry James Marshall, "Our Town“ 1995. Acrylic and collage on unstretched canvas, 100 x 124 inches. Collection of the artist, Chicago. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. "The condition of invisibility that Ralph Ellison describes [in 'Invisible Man'] is not a kind of transparency, but it's a psychological invisibility. It's where the presence of black people was often not wanted and denied in the American mindset. And so what I set out to do was to develop a figure or a form that would represent that condition of invisibility, where you had an incredible presence, but there was a way in which you could sometimes be seen and not seen at the same time.“ — Kerry James Marshall Slide16:  Kerry James Marshall, “RHYTHM MASTR,” prepara- tory drawing,1999-2000. Photocopy of ink drawing, and design marker on paper, 17 x 11 inches. Courtesy the Artist "I thought what I would do with this project would be to take a form that is, in some ways, already undervalued in America, take a subject that's under- represented, and try to develop a comic strip with a set of characters that had cultural significance but also allowed for a kind of imaginative play and inspiration. What I hit on as a subject was this idea that, for black people, the set of super heroes we come to know any- thing about have a lot to do with West African religious gods in a sense."— Kerry James Marshall Slide17:  Kerry James Marshall, “Souvenir II” 1997 Acrylic, paper, collage, and glitter on unstretched canvas, 108 x 120 inches. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. "I don't think that simply because I am an artist, or because anybody is an artist, that people ought to give their attention to the things that we've made. In some ways we have to earn our audience's attention, and one of the ways we earn our audience's attention is to make things that are phenomenologically fascinating." — Kerry James Marshall Slide18:  Kerry James Marshall, “Souvenir IV”1998. Acrylic, collage, and glitter on unstretched canvas, 108 x 156 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Purchase with funds from the Painting and Sculpture Committee Photo by Tom Vand Eynde. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. "The way I see beauty is as a state of being for a thing that has a kind of fascination about it, or as a thing that presents a certain kind of fascination to you as a viewer. It's certainly something that's captivating; it's something's that's compelling. Beauty is a phenomenological experience, and a basic component of it is intrigue."— Kerry James Marshall Slide19:  Kerry James Marshall, "Mementos"1998. Installation at the Renaissance Society, University of Chicago. Over-sized stamps and "Souvenir" series. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. "I wouldn't say that I never think about beauty as an aesthetic issue. But I certainly think it's a much more complicated issue then it's imagined to be. I think sometimes when people think of beauty they think of prettiness as a sign of beauty, but it's a lot more complicated and a lot deeper than that."— Kerry James Marshall Slide20:  Maya Lin, “Crater Series,” detail. 1997 11 beeswax sculptures, dimensions variable, glass shelf 1 1/2 x 96 x 10 inches Courtesy Gagosian Gallery, New York "I think for me, my sculptures deal with naturally occurring phenomena, and they're embedded and very closely aligned with geology and landscape and natural earth formations." — Maya Lin Slide21:  Maya Lin, “Crater Series” 1997. 11 beeswax sculptures, dimensions variable, glass shelf 1 1/2 x 96 x 10 inches. Courtesy Gagosian Gallery, New York. "I have two sides: creativity and the architecture. It's got ideas about framing the landscape, being ecologically and environmentally sensitive, not that a lot of the artworks aren't using recycled materials and about nature in another way. But formally, I liked that they're different, that I don't want my architecture looking like my sculptures and I don't want the sculptures being at all architectonic in their form.“ — Maya Lin Slide22:  Maya Lin, "Rock Field“. 1997 46 glass components, dimensions variable Installation at the South Eastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston- Salem, North Carolina. Photo by Jackson Smith. Courtesy the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art and Gagosian Gallery, New York. "I would say that so much of my work deals with the plastic medium of clay... My childhood is the '60s, and the notion of what plastic, fluid, design shapes were beginning to originate out of there, again, plays into the back of your head. But I think for me it was probably my father's potting that I would watch. That's something I really, really played with as a child and was probably more of an influence." — Maya Lin Slide23:  Maya Lin, "Vietnam Veterans Memorial" 1982 Black granite, each wall: 246 feet long, 10 1/2 feet high where the two sides come together, Chevron shaped. More than 58,000 names, in order of death/disappearance. Washington D.C. Courtesy the National Park Service Slide24:  Maya Lin, "Civil Rights Memorial“ 1989 Black granite, water table: 11 feet 6 inches in diameter, water wall: 40 feet long x 10 feet high The Southern Poverty Law Center, Montgomery, Alabama Photo by John O''Hagan Courtesy The Southern Poverty Law Center. Slide25:  Maya Lin, "Avalanche" 1997 Tempered glass, 10 x 19 x 21 Feet. Installation at the South Eastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston- Salem, North Carolina. Photo by Jackson Smith. Courtesy the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art and Gagosian Gallery, New York "The mediums I use range widely, from broken glass to water to granite. And I think formalistically, each time out with these large scale works, they can look very different. But there are some very strong underlying ideas that go throughout the works. One of them is time, one of them is an idea about landscape and the earth, or natural states or phenomena." — Maya Lin Slide26:  Maya Lin, "Avalanche," Detail of previous slide, 1997 Tempered glass, 10 x 19 x 21 Feet. Installation at the South Eastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston- Salem, North Carolina. Photo by Jackson Smith. Courtesy the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art and Gagosian Gallery, New York "I think art is wonderful because it's everything you've ever known and everything you've ever done, somehow percolating up, working with ideas that you might want to explore. And then you can just wake up one morning and know what you want to do. The hissing of the heat." — Maya Lin Slide27:  Maya Lin, "The Wave Field“ 1995. Shaped earth, 100 x 100 feet, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. "With the 'Wave Field' in Michigan, it was for an aerospace engineering building and I had no idea what I was going to do. My site could have been in the building they were building or outside. And I just read up on aerospace and flight for three months and then came up with the idea of the 'Wave Field,' which is basically a book image of a natural occurring water wave that came about because flight requires resistance, and that led to turbulence studies, which led to fluid dynamics." — Maya Lin Slide28:  Louise Bourgeois, “Cell (Eyes and Mirrors)” 1989-1993 Marble, mirrors, steel and glass, 93 x 83 x 86 inches Collection Tate Gallery, London Photo by Peter Bellamy Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York Slide29:  Louise Bourgeois, “Femme Volage (Fickle Woman)” 1951 Painted wood, 72 x 17 1/2 x 13 inches Guggenheim Museum, New York Photo by Allan Fickelman Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York Slide30:  Louise Bourgeois, “Femme Volage (Fickle Woman),” Detail of previous slide, 1951 Painted wood, 72 x 17 1/2 x 13 inches Guggenheim Museum, New York Photo by Allan Fickelman Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York Slide31:  Louise Bourgeois, “Spiral Woman” 1984, Bronze and slate disc; bronze: 11 1/2 x 3 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches, disc diameter: 1 x 34 3/4 inches Collection Elaine Dannheiser, New York Photo by Allan Fickelman Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York   Slide32:  Louise Bourgeois, “Spiral” 1994 Watercolor, ink, and color pencil on paper, 13 1/4 x 9 1/2 inches Photo by Beth Phillips Courtesy the Artist Slide33:  Louise Bourgeois, “The Nest” 1994, Steel, 101 x 189 x 158 inches Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA Courtesy Louise Bourgeois archive Slide34:  Louise Bourgeois, “One and Others” 1955. Painted wood, 18 1/4 x 20 x 16 3/4 inches Whitney Museum of American Art, New York Photo by Jeffrey Clements Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York Slide35:  Louise Bourgeois, “Articulated Lair” 1986 Painted steel, rubber, and stool, 132 x 132 x 132 inches The Museum of Modern Art, New York Gift of Lily Auchincloss and of the artist in honor of Deborah Wye Photo by Peter Bellamy Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York Slide36:  Barbara Kruger, “Untitled (When I hear the world culture, I take out my checkbook)” 1985 Gelatin silver print 138 x 60 inches Collection of Eileen and Peter Norton, Santa Monica, California Courtesy Mary Boone Gallery, New York Slide37:  Barbara Kruger, “Untitled (I shop, therefore I am)” 1987 Photographic silkscreen on vinyl, 111 x 113 inches Courtesy Mary Boone Gallery, New York Slide38:  Barbara Kruger, “Untitled (Your body is a battleground)” 1990 Billboard, commissioned by the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio, for its “New Works for New Spaces: Into the Nineties” exhibition Photo by Fredrik Marsh Courtesy Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio Slide39:  Michael Ray Charles Michael Ray Charles’ paintings investigate stereotypes drawn from the history of American advertising, product packaging, billboards, and commercials. Charles draws comparisons between Sambo, Mammy, and minstrel images of an earlier era and contemporary portrayals of black youths, celebrities, and athletes—images he sees as a constant in the American subconscious. The Artist’s Words: "I've heard a number of things, been called the sellout, the 'Chris Rock' of the art world (I like that one by the way). And people accuse me and question my blackness—they accuse me of making paintings that deal with these images because 'white folks want to see these images' And I'm saying to myself, 'Boy, I don't know,' in that white folks wanted to see these images to laugh at?“ — Michael Ray Charles What do YOU think? Slide40:  Michael Ray Charles, “(Forever Free) ‘Servin with a smile’” 1994, Acrylic latex and *copper penny on paper, 40 x 26 inches Private collection, Photo by Beth Phillips Courtesy Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York The Artist’s Words: "I've seen some black folks refer to these images as black folks. I've seen and heard white folk refer to these images as black folks. And it's really disturbing. They don't say images, they don't say representations, whether grotesque or accurate or abstracted...That's troublesome because... they're images that are constructed, they're both black and white, conceived in a white mind and believed in the black mind." — Michael Ray Charles *SEE THE EXPLANATION OF THE COPPER PENNY IN EACH OF HIS WORKS IN THE BOOK. Slide41:  Michael Ray Charles, “(Forever Free) Buy Black!” 1996. Acrylic latex, stain, and copper penny on paper, 30 3/4 x 24 1/4 inches. Private collection Photo by Beth Phillips. Courtesy Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York The Artist’s Words: "You've got to think of how these images were used in American culture...they were everywhere and they were used to market anything from oils to ink, from food products to clothing...People operate from an emotional place when they see these images because they think of the past as being something that happened and that the concepts don't linger. But these concepts continue to affect us in many ways, in modern concepts of advertising as well as in contemporary advertisements." — Michael Ray Charles Slide42:  Michael Ray Charles, “Before Black (To See or Not to See)” 1997, Acrylic latex, stain, and copper penny on paper, 60 x 37 1/2 inches. Private collection. Photo by Beth Phillips. Courtesy Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York. The Artist’s words: "Some black folks really see the images and say, 'That's us, but at the same time that's not us.' So they're caught right in between it. Some white folks see the images and smile and laugh, and some are really concerned and disturbed. And some are quite confused, just as confused as blacks are..." — Michael Ray Charles Slide43:  Michael Ray Charles, “After Black (To See or Not to See)” 1997. Acrylic latex, stain, and copper penny on paper, 60 x 36 inches Private collection. Photo by Beth Phillips Courtesy Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York The Artist’s words: "I think that these images are just as much white as they are black. They've been projected and internalized. I think people have accepted them to be, you know, representational, an accurate representation." — Michael Ray Charles Slide44:  Michael Ray Charles, “(Liberty Brothers Permanent Daily Circus) Blue Period” 1995 Acrylic latex, oil wash, stain, and copper penny on paper, 60 1/2 x 36 1/2 inches Private collection. Photo by Beth Phillips Courtesy Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York The Artist’s Words: "One could think about notions of blackness and how they're linked to entertainment, athleticism, sports (which has become another form of entertainment) but never intellectualism for the most part. And if that is the case, it's very rare. But for the most part, collectively, I would say that blackness continues to hover around this comfort zone of entertainment—providers of entertainment." — Michael Ray Charles Slide45:  Matthew Barney, “CREMASTER 1” 1995. Production still. Photo by Peter Strietmann, © 1995 Matthew Barney. Courtesy Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York The Artist’s words: "A lot of these angles—aside from the moving camera car are really about trying to mimic broadcast sports angles in order to anchor the scene, to sort of normalize it before it becomes abstracted, which is something we do often, and it happens a lot with sports references that are made in all the projects.“ — Matthew Barney Slide46:  Matthew Barney, “CREMASTER 1” 1995. Production still. Photo by Peter Strietmann, © 1995 Matthew Barney. Courtesy Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York The Artist’s words: "If there was a structure that was greater than the "CREMASTER" structure, it would have to be something like UPS—something that's fleet oriented, that would have air transport and a kind of local transport to really finish that line. You have a kind of consistent color in the way that UPS is brown and the logo is gold."— Matthew Barney Slide47:  Matthew Barney, CREMASTER 1” 1995. Production still. Photo by Peter Strietmann, © 1995 Matthew Barney. Courtesy Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York "In the interest of creating a system that has an internal logic, I think there are points in the story where biological systems are referred to or used as art direction in a certain way. I've always thought of the project as a sort of sexually driven digestive system, that it was a consumer and a producer of matter. And it is desire driven, rather than driven by hunger or anything like that. It's a desire in the sense of a kind of sexual desire."— Matthew Barney Slide48:  Matthew Barney, “CREMASTER 2” 1999 Production still. Photo by Michael James O’Brien, © 1999 Matthew Barney. Courtesy Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York The Artist’s words: "The stories themselves are some- what interchangeable. In a sense they're kind of carriers. In other words, "CREMASTER 2" could have had a couple of other stories other than Norman Mailer's "The Executioner's Song" to carry it. "The Executioner's Song" was its carrier, in that the Rocky Mountains were the real story." — Matthew Barney Slide49:  Matthew Barney, “CREMASTER 4” 1994, Production still. Photo by Peter Strietmann, © 1994 Matthew Barney Courtesy Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York The Artist’s words: "I think a lot of the references I make to American traditions—whether it's athletics or a kind of car culture—I think those are things that I've certainly grown up with and understand. It makes those things very available to me to use, and I consider them as kinds of vessels... they're used as carriers...the concept of a vehicle draws a line between locations... — Matthew Barney Slide50:  Matthew Barney, “CREMASTER 5” 1997, Production still. Photo by Michael James O’Brien, © Matthew Barney. Courtesy Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York The Artist’s words: "The cremaster are a set of muscles that control the height of the internal reproductive system in the male. I took that one as a title for a couple reasons, primarily in that the story, over the course of five chapters, has to do with a kind of system whose state is fluctuating, not necessarily literally as a reproductive system, but as a system whose identity is changing." — Matthew Barney Slide51:  Matthew Barney, “CREMASTER 5” 1997 Production still. Photo by Michael James O’Brien, © Matthew Barney Courtesy Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York The Artist’s words: "The five chapters of the story are about an organism that is changing, and the system that changes that form alters from chapter to chapter...It's essentially about an imposed will onto the state of the [cremaster] form, sometimes in a very abstract way, sometimes in a more literal, biological way. But it's basically a structural word. It's being used as a way to tell the story, and not as a way to define a biological system at all." — Matthew Barney Slide52:  Matthew Barney, “CREMASTER 3” 2000 Production still. Photo by Chris Winget, © 2000 Matthew Barney Courtesy Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York The Artist’s words: "The story [of "CREMASTER 3"] has two principals, the Architect and the Mason's Apprentice...The Architect, who's played by Richard Serra, is shown sort of as himself in the game, throwing Vaseline on the top of "Level Five." And he's throwing hot Vaseline in exactly the same way that he threw hot lead in the late '60s." — Matthew Barney Slide53:  Andrea Zittel, “A-Z Administrative Services,” exterior view, 1997 Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York Courtesy the Artist The Artist’s words: "A lot of times I’d have to contact fabricators…and when I called (especially when I was twenty and I would call with my voice and my accent) no one would help me with anything. So I started using the title ‘A To Z Administrative Services,’ almost as a joke. And I made letterhead and business cards and I’d call people up and I’d ask them for information. And they would automatically assume that I was a secretary calling for a legitimate company. Through the years it’s really opened a lot of doors and it’s really helped me to function." — Andrea Zittel Slide54:  Andrea Zittel, “A-Z Administrative Services,” exterior view, 1997 Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York. Courtesy the Artist The Artist’s words: "All of my work is done under this identity of ‘A To Z Administrative Services.’ I’ve been doing that since I was a kid because my initials are 'a' and 'z'. And I just started noticing how many businesses and signs I would pass used ‘A to Z.’ It’s ironic that it got drawn into my art making process. It wasn’t a conceptual, it was out practical necessity." — Andrea Zittel Slide55:  Andrea Zittel, “A-Z Living Unit II,” front view, 1994. Steel, wood, metal, mattress, glass, mirror, lighting fixture, oven, range, velvet upholstery, utensils, sauce pans, bowls, towel, hair brush, pillow, and clock; open: 57 x 84 x 82 inches, closed: 36 3/4 x 84 x 38 inches. Courtesy Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York. "When I first started doing furniture or what later became the 'Living Units,' I didn't really consider it part of my artwork. It was simply a solution for these circumstances that I had to live in.“ — Andrea Zittel Slide56:  Andrea Zittel, “A-Z Living Unit II,” rear view,1994. Steel, wood, metal, mattress, glass, mirror, lighting fixture, oven, range, velvet upholstery, utensils, sauce pans, bowls, towel, hair brush, pillow, and clock; open: 57 x 84 x 82 inches, closed: 36 3/4 x 84 x 38 inches Courtesy Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York. "All of my ideas, they're sort of humorous, but they're also a little dark at the same time. It's like I have this fantasy of being completely autonomous and independent and at peace, not having any of the day to day problems, but then there's also this sense of isolation that comes along with it.“ — Andrea Zittel Slide57:  Andrea Zittel, “A-Z Travel Trailer Unit Customized by Andrea Zittel” 1995 Steel, wood, glass, carpet, aluminum, and various objects, 93 x 93 x 192 inches. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Accession Committee Fund. Courtesy the Artist. "It’s important too that I’m a small identity or a small entity trying to function, managing to pull off these large-scale projects. Managing to do things that people usually think that you have to be an expert to do or an architect, like to make a trailer or to a 44-ton concrete island. I like this aspect that I’m sort of small, but I create the visual appearance of something large… and how it takes only a few to create this whole structure."— Andrea Zittel Slide58:  Andrea Zittel, “A-Z Bathroom” 1997 The bathroom cabinets are divided into four categories: Addition, Subtraction, Correction, and Pathology. Photo by Orcutt & Van Der Putten. Courtesy the Artist The Artist’s words: "There's a continual theme in my life and in my work. It's about taking something that seems like it's one way and flipping it over so it becomes the other. So I like to take things that are maybe limitations in my life and try to somehow recontextualize them, glamorize them, make them more interest- ing, and vice versa. So I took my simple living situation and used this certain aesthetic code of modern design, and made it, in my mind, very glamorous." — Andrea Zittel Slide59:  Andrea Zittel, "Various A-Z Six Month Seasonal Uniforms“ 1992-1995 Various fabrics, leather straps, and suspenders; dimensions variable. Installed at Diechtorhallen, Hamburg, Germany Photo by Jens Rathman. Courtesy the Artist. "I’ve been doing this uniform project since 1991. It started because I had an office job and I was supposed to wear something respectable to work. But I didn’t have that much money and so I was thinking about how most of the time we can afford one fabulous outfit that you really love to wear. But there’s some sort of social stigma against wearing the same thing two days in a row. So I decided that, in my case, variety seemed more oppressive or restrictive than continuity. So for each season I’ll make one garment. That’s my fantasy garment or my favorite thing that I can imagine at that period in time, and then I'll wear it every day for for six months.“ — Andrea Zittel   Slide60:  Andrea Zittel, “A-Z Prototype for Pocket Property,” floating off the coast of Denmark 1999. Concrete, steel, wood, dirt, and vegetation, approximately 23 x 54 feet Courtesy the Artist. "It's like a suburbia floating out in the ocean, so you're completely alone, you're completely autonomous, but you have also this sense of community within that. Obviously no one knows how to make something like this, so we've just been trying to figure it out. I've been reading a lot of books on houseboat construction. With the first one that we made, I actually insisted that it should be made out of concrete, which was probably a mistake. But I had this idea that concrete was extremely literal. Concrete's like rock or earth. “ — Andrea Zittel Please Note: the rest of the slides in Powerpoint Two are all from Book 2 of Art: 21. (They are also part of Exam Two.) :  Please Note: the rest of the slides in Powerpoint Two are all from Book 2 of Art: 21. (They are also part of Exam Two.) Art 3101 Dr. David Ludley Slide62:  Kara Walker, "Slavery! Slavery! presenting a GRAND and LIFELIKE Panoramic Journey into Picturesque Southern Slavery or "Life at 'Ol' Virginny's Hole' (sketches from Plantation Life)" See the Peculiar Institu- tions as never before! All cut from black paper by the able hand of Kara Elizabeth Walker, an Emanci- pated Negress and leader in her Cause“ 1997 See Further Details on next Powerpoint Slide: Kara Walker, Slavery! Slavery! (Continued):  Kara Walker, Slavery! Slavery! (Continued) Installation view, “no place (like home),” at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1997 Cut paper and adhesive on wall, 12 x 85 feet Collection of Eileen and Peter Norton, Sanata Monica, California Photo by Dan Dennehy for the Wal Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York Slide64:  Kara Walker, “No mere words can Adequately reflect the Remorse this Negress feels at having been Cast into such a lowly state by her former Masters and so it is with a Humble heart that she brings about their physical Ruin and earthly Demise” 1999 Details and explanation follow on next Powerpoint slide: Installation view at the California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, California Cut paper and adhesive on painted wall, 10 x 65 feet Collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York “One thing that got me interested in working with silhouettes, but then working on the large scale, had to do with two sorts of longings. One was to make history painting in the grand tradition. I love history paintings. I didn’t realize I loved them for a long time. I thought that they were ridiculous in their pompous gesture. But the more I started to examine my own relationship with history, my own attempts to position myself in my historical moment, the more love I had for this artistic, painterly conceit, which is to make a painting a stage, and to think of your characters, your portraits, as characters on that stage. And to give them this moment, to freeze-frame a moment that is full of pain and blood and guts and drama and glory.” :  Installation view at the California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, California Cut paper and adhesive on painted wall, 10 x 65 feet Collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York “One thing that got me interested in working with silhouettes, but then working on the large scale, had to do with two sorts of longings. One was to make history painting in the grand tradition. I love history paintings. I didn’t realize I loved them for a long time. I thought that they were ridiculous in their pompous gesture. But the more I started to examine my own relationship with history, my own attempts to position myself in my historical moment, the more love I had for this artistic, painterly conceit, which is to make a painting a stage, and to think of your characters, your portraits, as characters on that stage. And to give them this moment, to freeze-frame a moment that is full of pain and blood and guts and drama and glory.” Slide66:  Kara Walker, “Untitled (Hunting Scenes)” 2001.Cut paper and adhesive on wall Left panel: 98 x 68 inches. Right panel: 103 x 63 inches Collection of Centro Nazionale per le Arti Contemporanea, Rome, Italy Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York “I was looking at racist paraphernalia, iconography, and then at these accurate versions of middle-class Americans. I began to associate the silhouette itself, the cutting, with a form of blackface minstrelsy. Here we have these mainly white sitters or a few slaves who were documented in silhouette—but for the most part white sitters whom I identify as middle class because upper class would require a full-fledged oil portrait and that’s what I had already ruled out for myself…’No oil painting here, not going to ape the master that way.’” — Kara Walker Slide67:  Kara Walker, “Insurrection! (Our Tools Were Rudimentary, Yet We Pressed On)”2002. Installation view at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Projection, cut paper and adhesive on wall, 12 x 74 1/2 feet Collection of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Photo by Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York. “’Insurrection!’ The idea at the outset was an image of a slave revolt in the antebellum south where the house slaves got after their master with their utensils of everyday life, and really it started with a sketch of a series of slaves disemboweling a master with a soup ladle. My reference, in my mind, was the surgical theatre paintings of Thomas Eakins and others.” — Kara Walker Slide68:  Kara Walker, "Mistress Demanded a Swift and Dramatic Empathetic Reaction Which We Obliged Her" 2000. Projection, cut paper and adhesive on wall, 12 x 17 feet. Collection of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York "One of the things that's happened here with the work that I've done is that because it mimics narrative, and narrative is a kind of given when it comes to work produced by black women in this country, there's almost an expectation of something cohesive…a kind of 'Color Purple' scenario where things resolve in a certain way. A female heroine actualizes through a process of self-discovery and historical discovery and comes out from under her oppressors and maybe doesn't become a hero but is a hero for herself. And nothing ever comes of that in the pieces that I'm making." — Kara Walker Slide69:  Kiki Smith, “Rapture” 2001 Bronze, 67 1/4 x 62 x 26 1/2 inches Edition of 3.Photo by Ellen Page Wilson Courtesy PaceWildenstein, New York “It’s a resurrection/birth story; ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ is a kind of resurrection/ birth myth. And then I thought it was like Venus on the half shell or like the Virgin on the moon. It’s the same form—a large horizontal form and a vertical coming out of it.” — Kiki Smith Slide70:  Kiki Smith, “Born” 2002. Bronze, 39 x 101 x 24 inches. Edition of 3. Photo by Kerry Ryan McFate. Courtesy PaceWildenstein, New York “I made ‘Born,’ a Genevieve being born of a deer. And I also have no idea where that came from. You can say that it relates to different mythological stories or something. Sometimes I’m making things and people will say, ‘Oh, that’s Diana; oh, that’s Daphne.’ But I don’t know. It just pops into my head.” — Kiki Smith Slide71:  Kiki Smith, “Lying with the Wolf” 2001 Ink and pencil on paper, 72 1/4 x 88 inches. Photo by Kerry Ryan McFate Courtesy Pace- Wildenstein, New York “In the Louvre I saw a picture of Genevieve sitting with the wolves and the lambs…I had stopped making images of people for a couple of years; I just wanted to make animals. But then I saw that picture, and I thought, ‘It’s really impor- tant to put them all together.’ So I drew my friend Genevieve as the Genevieve, and then I made all these wolves (I didn’t make lambs).” — Kiki Smith Slide72:  Kiki Smith, “King Kong” 2002 Bronze, 20 x 21 x 8 inches including base. Edition of 3 Photo by Ellen Page Wilson Courtesy PaceWildenstein, New York “Last year I went to see Bill T. Jones evening of dance, and one of his dances used a song about King Kong. It was just about King Kong looking for the woman, getting the woman, and all his tribulations. It was really sort of moving. But then I thought, King Kong and the woman are sort of the same size in real life. I thought of making a life-size sculpture, and then I thought that was too ambitious. But I made the sculpture of King Kong and the woman together.” — Kiki Smith Slide73:  Do-Ho Suh, “Public Figures” 1998-1999. Installation view at Metrotech Center Commons, Brooklyn, New York. Fiberglass/resin, steel pipes, pipe fittings, 10 x 7 x 9 feet. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York “Let’s say if there’s one statue at the plaza of a hero who helped or protected our country, there are hundreds of thousands of individuals who helped him and worked with him, and there’s no recognition for them. So in my sculpture, ‘Public Figures,’ I had around six hundred small figures, twelve inches high, six different shapes, both male and female, of different ethnicities.” — Do-Ho Suh Slide74:  Do-Ho Suh, “Doormat: Welcome (Amber)” 1998. Polyurethane rubber, 1 1/4 x 28 x 19 inches. Edition of 5. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York “What defines the individual versus individuals? For me it was just very natural to think about the interpersonal space, the space between people. And that’s why this idea of individual and collective came in. I still think, for me, it’s an issue of space.” — Do-Ho Suh Slide75:  Do-Ho Suh, “Doormat: Welcome (Amber),” detail 0f the previous slide. 1998 Polyurethane rubber, 1 1/4 x 28 x 19 Inches. Edition of 5. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York “I have to say that my work actually started from my interest in the notion of space, particularly this notion of personal space or individual space. And that’s actually the result of contemplation on the idea of how much space one person can carry.” — Do-Ho Suh Slide76:  Do-Ho Suh, High School Uni-Form, 1997, Fabric, plastic, stainless steel, casters, 54 by 276 by 217 inches. “Sixty high-school uniforms together in one…It’s a jacket of a high-school uniform, all in black with gold buttons and a priest-like collar… It’s a funny thing. Koreans have this Nostalgia about the uniform [even though] we hated to wear the uniform…But we tried our Best to differentiate our uniforms from one another…It’s the individual versus collectivity.” --Do-Ho Suh. Slide77:  Do-Ho Suh, “Seoul Home/L.A. Home/New York Home/Baltimore Home/London Home /Seattle Home” 1999. Silk, 149 x 240 x 240 inches. Installation view at the Seattle Asian Art Museum, Seattle, 2002. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Purchased with funds provided by an anonymous donor and a gift of the artist Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York “My Korean house project was about transporting space from one place to the other, a way of dealing with cultural displacement. I don’t really get homesick that much, but I’ve noticed that I have this longing for a particular space and just want to recreate it or bring it wherever I go. So the choice of material was fabric. I had to make something light and transportable, something that you can fold and put in a suitcase and bring with me all the time. That’s actually what happened when I made ‘Seoul Home/L.A. Home.’” — Do-Ho Suh Slide78:  Do-Ho Suh, “Seoul Home/L.A. Home/New York Home/Baltimore Home/London Home /Seattle Home” 1999. Silk, 149 x 240 x 240 Inches. Installation view at the Korean Cultural Center, Los Angeles, 1999. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Purchased with funds provided by an anonymous donor and a gift of the artist. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York “I think that by measuring and scrutinizing and investigating everything possible you really consume the space and it becomes part of you. Now you feel like it’s in you and you feel comfortable. That’s why I did my first site-specific installations, and I did the same thing with my Korean house project. But once you take that piece down from its site and transport it and display it in a different place, the idea of site-specific becomes highly questionable and refutable. That’s what I was really interested in because I think this notion of home is something you can repeat infinitely.” — Do-Ho Suh Slide79:  “Some/One” 2001 Installation view at Korean Pavilion, Biennale di Venezia, Venice, Italy Stainless steel military dog tags, nickel-plated copper sheets, steel structure, glass fiber reinforced resin, rubber sheets Figure: 81 x 126 inches diameter, overall dimen Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York “I wanted the viewer to have an experience with these little dog tags, these thousands of dog tags. It symbolizes each individual’s identity…these many dog tags create this one, larger-than-life figure. It’s ambiguous whether you’re a part of it or not. Whether you are the owner of this robe when you see your own image over there. So that’s why I had the mirror inside.” — Do-Ho Suh Do-Ho Suh, “Some/One” 2001 Installation view at Korean Pavilion, Biennale di Venezia, Venice, Italy Stainless steel military dog tags, nickel-plated copper sheets, steel structure, glass fiber reinforced resin, rubber sheets. Figure: 81 x 126 inches diameter, overall dimensions. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York “I wanted the viewer to have an experience with these little dog tags, these thousands of dog tags. It symbolizes each individual’s identity… these many dog tags create this one, larger-than -life figure. It’s ambiguous whether you’re a part of it or not. Whether you are the owner of this robe when you see your own image over there. So that’s why I had the mirror inside.” — Do-Ho Suh Slide80:  “Some/One,” detail of previous slide. 2001 Installation view at Korean Pavilion, Biennale di Venezia, Venice, Italy. Stainless steel military dog tags, nickel-plated copper sheets, steel structure, glass fiber reinforced resin, rubber sheets. Figure: 81 x 126 inches diameter, overall dimensions. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York “It looks like a kind of ancient Oriental armor. The first sculpture was covered with three thousand military dog tags. From a distance the dog tags look like fish scales. The shape of that jacket was not something that I invented. I used the U.S. military jacket liner and just put the dog tags on the top of it. So I used all contemporary materials but they ended up looking like ancient ones.” — Do-Ho Suh Slide81:  Trenton Doyle Hancock, “Rememor with Membry” 2001 Acrylic on canvas, 54 x 66 inches Collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York and Dunn and Brown Contemporary, Dallas “I like to play with language, word- play and puns, alliteration and onomatopoeia, poetic devices within the work. Since the writing aspect of the work has become so much more important, I see fit to draw upon all those elements to get things done.” — Trenton Doyle Hancock Slide82:  Trenton Doyle Hancock, “The Legend is in Trouble” 2001, Mixed media on canvas, 104 x 120 1/2 inches Collection Kenneth Freed, Boston, Massachusetts Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York and Dunn and Brown Contemporary, Dallas “I had been able to see death edging toward The Legend for almost a year but was powerless to stop it. Ultimately, The Legend succumbed due to injuries sustained during an attack by a band of vicious Vegan rebels. No amount of wobbling could have stopped these guys. They wanted it too bad. I guess our last hope would have been Torpedoboy but, by the time he got there, The Legend was leaking moundmeat in about sixty-two places.” — Trenton Doyle Hancock Slide83:  Trenton Doyle Hancock, “Painter and Loid Struggle for Soul Control” 2001 Mixed media on canvas, 103 x 119 inches Collection of Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas, Austin, Texas Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York and Dunn and Brown Contemporary, Dallas “I see each character as a separate part of me. I can separate one aspect of my being out and then put it in front of me and then look at it. And it’s kind of like all of these things are inside me at once, battling each other. And at certain points one is dominant.” — Trenton Doyle Hancock Slide84:  Trenton Doyle Hancock, “Bye and Bye” 2002. Acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 84 x 132 inches Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas. Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York and Dunn and Brown Contemporary, Dallas “The words ‘bye and bye’ are cut out of the piece because I just wanted another layer of information. It’s always interesting for me to extend painting a little bit further from myself than it has to be, to make it just a little harder than it has to be. All of the letters cut out of this piece are glued back in different places, so you have this recession of space and this built-up space. Then, when you come up to the painting you experience it on several different levels.” — Trenton Doyle Hancock Slide85:  Trenton Doyle Hancock, “Ferroneous & the Monk” 1999 Mixed media on felt, 102 x 114 1/2 Inches. Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York and Dunn and Brown Contemporary, Dallas “’Ferroneus & The Monk’ is what I call a dream flash. That’s how Mounds dream—in big colorful landscapes filled with floating objects and symbols. Mounds are rooted in the ground. They can’t really move. So in their dreams they’re very mobile. They can go anywhere. All over the place!” — Trenton Doyle Hancock Slide86:  Trenton Doyle Hancock, “Sturdi of Loo”2002 Mixed media on felt, 69 1/4 x 72 1/2 Inches. Collection of Michael E. Thomas, Dallas, Texas. Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York and Dunn and Brown Contemporary, Dallas “I wanted to do a body of work that focused on the garbage and pieces of paper and scraps of canvas I had lying around on my studio floor, and where those scraps could ultimately lead me. What they led to was a body of work that at first glance seems disjointed—as if each element has nothing to do with the next. But on further scrutiny, you realize that it’s all interconnected.” — Trenton Doyle Hancock

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