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Architectural Sculpture Sculptural Architecture

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Published on November 1, 2007

Author: Laurie

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Architectural Sculpture Sculptural Architecture http://www.nytimes.com/packages/khtml/2007/03/27/arts/artsspecial/20070328_BIRTH_AUDIOSS.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1175178451-CKgno4UBJdFF1+NuoR9TeA :  Architectural Sculpture Sculptural Architecture http://www.nytimes.com/packages/khtml/2007/03/27/arts/artsspecial/20070328_BIRTH_AUDIOSS.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1175178451-CKgno4UBJdFF1+NuoR9TeA New Museum of Contemporary Art, NYC designed by SANAA: Kazuyo Sejima & Ryue Nishizawa Alice Aycock (US, b. 1946) Maze, 1972, Pennsylvania (destroyed) “Originally, I had hoped to create a moment of absolute panic when the only thing that mattered was to get out.” (embodied vision – phenomenological consciousness):  Alice Aycock (US, b. 1946) Maze, 1972, Pennsylvania (destroyed) “Originally, I had hoped to create a moment of absolute panic when the only thing that mattered was to get out.” (embodied vision – phenomenological consciousness) Richard Serra, Bilbao permanent collection (left); Torqued Elipses, 1997, Dia (right) spatial affinity-unity-dialectical intercourse of museum and sculpture. Both work to create a theatrical space, an embodied visual-spatial experience:  Richard Serra, Bilbao permanent collection (left); Torqued Elipses, 1997, Dia (right) spatial affinity-unity-dialectical intercourse of museum and sculpture. Both work to create a theatrical space, an embodied visual-spatial experience Zaha Hadid (British b. Iraq, 1950) Wolfsburg, Germany, Science Center, 2002 Deconstructivist Architecture and new digital design possibilities:  Zaha Hadid (British b. Iraq, 1950) Wolfsburg, Germany, Science Center, 2002 Deconstructivist Architecture and new digital design possibilities Jackie Ferrara (US, b. 1924), sculptures pre-conceived in numerous detailed drawings as in architectural design:  Jackie Ferrara (US, b. 1924), sculptures pre-conceived in numerous detailed drawings as in architectural design A201 Ribat, 1979, wood 86 x 51 x 20 in M160, masonite 4 x 13 x 13” 1976 1-14 Ramp, masonite 3 x 17 x 48”, 1974 A209 Zogg, 1980, Pine 112” H (left) Emilio Ambasz (American b.1943 Argentina) Fukuoka Prefectural Hall, section & aerial views, ink jet prints on watercolor paper with hand-drawing in colored pencil, 1998 (right) Compare Jackie Ferrara sculpture, A201 Ribat, 1979:  (left) Emilio Ambasz (American b.1943 Argentina) Fukuoka Prefectural Hall, section & aerial views, ink jet prints on watercolor paper with hand-drawing in colored pencil, 1998 (right) Compare Jackie Ferrara sculpture, A201 Ribat, 1979 Alice Aycock, Functional and Fantasy Stair, 1996, San Francisco Main Library, 100 Larkin St., Periodicals Reading Room, 5th floor and 4th Floor Atrium Aluminum, painted steel, stainless steel, and plaster sculpture. The “Functional and Fantasy Stair” wraps around a two-story sculptural cone with an appearance of unraveling itself. As it unravels, fragments of imaginary stairs peel away.:  Alice Aycock, Functional and Fantasy Stair, 1996, San Francisco Main Library, 100 Larkin St., Periodicals Reading Room, 5th floor and 4th Floor Atrium Aluminum, painted steel, stainless steel, and plaster sculpture. The “Functional and Fantasy Stair” wraps around a two-story sculptural cone with an appearance of unraveling itself. As it unravels, fragments of imaginary stairs peel away. Cyclone Fragment Frank Gehry (US b. Canada, 1929) Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain, 1997 compare (right) Aycock, Functional and Fantasy Stair, 1996:  Frank Gehry (US b. Canada, 1929) Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain, 1997 compare (right) Aycock, Functional and Fantasy Stair, 1996 Tim Hawkinson (US, b. San Francisco, 1960) (left) Überorgan, 2007, woven polyethylene, nylon net, cardboard tubing, and various mechanical components. Getty installation (Santa Monica), 2007. In this version it interacts with the modernist white walls, travertine, and glass of Richard Meier's architecture:  Tim Hawkinson (US, b. San Francisco, 1960) (left) Überorgan, 2007, woven polyethylene, nylon net, cardboard tubing, and various mechanical components. Getty installation (Santa Monica), 2007. In this version it interacts with the modernist white walls, travertine, and glass of Richard Meier's architecture Überorgan 2000 at MassMoCA (right top and bottom) Sound and air controls Slide12:  Vladimir Tatlin, Monument to the 3rd International, Petrograd, 1920 Russian Constructivism Peace Tower, (left) 1966, Los Angeles; (right) 2006 Whitney Biennial 2006, NYC, Mark di Suvero and Rirkrit Tiravanija Emilio Ambasz, La Casa de Retiro Espiritual (House of Spiritual Retreat) 1979 Cordoba, Spain :  Emilio Ambasz, La Casa de Retiro Espiritual (House of Spiritual Retreat) 1979 Cordoba, Spain Slide14:  Ambasz, photograph from exhibition catalogue, MoMA NYC “In Depth: The House of Spiritual Retreat,” November – March, 2006 Learning from Las Vegas, 1972 Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Steven Izenour Learning from Las Vegas marked the historical origin of postmodern architecture. The book created a controversy in 1972 by calling for architects to be more receptive to the tastes and values of "common" people and less immodest in their erections of "heroic," self-aggrandizing monuments.:  Learning from Las Vegas, 1972 Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Steven Izenour Learning from Las Vegas marked the historical origin of postmodern architecture. The book created a controversy in 1972 by calling for architects to be more receptive to the tastes and values of "common" people and less immodest in their erections of "heroic," self-aggrandizing monuments. "A roadway could become a city. A building could become a sign. In no place at all, someplace could be created. That is Las Vegas' genius.“ from Learning from Las Vegas Gropius, Bauhaus, 1925-6, a modern icon Postmodern “Vernacular” Architecture Frank Gehry, (top left) Fishdance Restaurant, Kobe, Japan, 1987 (left below) Gehry and Claes Oldenburg, Chiat-Day, 1986, Venice, California (right) Anonymous, Duck Restaurant, from Learning from Las Vegas:  Postmodern “Vernacular” Architecture Frank Gehry, (top left) Fishdance Restaurant, Kobe, Japan, 1987 (left below) Gehry and Claes Oldenburg, Chiat-Day, 1986, Venice, California (right) Anonymous, Duck Restaurant, from Learning from Las Vegas Gehry House, by Frank Gehry, at Santa Monica, California, 1978 “Deconstructive” domestic architecture:  Gehry House, by Frank Gehry, at Santa Monica, California, 1978 “Deconstructive” domestic architecture Gordon Matta-Clark (US, 1943–1978), Splitting, 1974 Matta-Clark cut through (with a chain saw) a condemned suburban two-story home in Englewood, New Jersey, splitting it down the middle. :  Gordon Matta-Clark (US, 1943–1978), Splitting, 1974 Matta-Clark cut through (with a chain saw) a condemned suburban two-story home in Englewood, New Jersey, splitting it down the middle. “anarchitecture” (anarchy + architecture) Undoes the “home” as place of security Gordon Matta-Clark, Splitting, 1974, chromogenic prints mounted on board, 40 x 30 in. “non-u-mental” - “to convert a place into a state of mind”:  Gordon Matta-Clark, Splitting, 1974, chromogenic prints mounted on board, 40 x 30 in. “non-u-mental” - “to convert a place into a state of mind” Matta-Clark, Conical Intersect, 1974, near the Pompidou Center (Beaubourg), two townhouses dated 1699 in the First Arrondissement, Paris :  Matta-Clark, Conical Intersect, 1974, near the Pompidou Center (Beaubourg), two townhouses dated 1699 in the First Arrondissement, Paris Cornelia Parker (English b. 1956 - a “YBA”: Young British Artist), Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View  1991, a garden shed that had been filled with domestic objects by the artist and exploded by the British Army at her request. Below left is shed prior to explosion.:  Cornelia Parker (English b. 1956 - a “YBA”: Young British Artist), Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View  1991, a garden shed that had been filled with domestic objects by the artist and exploded by the British Army at her request. Below left is shed prior to explosion. detail Cornelia Parker, Mass (Colder Darker Matter), 1997, Charcoal retrieved from a church struck by lightning (Baptist Church of Lytle, Texas), approximately 156 x 126 x 126”:  Cornelia Parker, Mass (Colder Darker Matter), 1997, Charcoal retrieved from a church struck by lightning (Baptist Church of Lytle, Texas), approximately 156 x 126 x 126” Detail Louise Bourgeois (French-American b. 1911) (left) with sculpture on roof of NYC apartment building, c.1944 (center) Femme Maison (Woman House) 1947, ink on paper (right) The Listening One 1947-9. bronze (cast in the late 1980s):  Louise Bourgeois (French-American b. 1911) (left) with sculpture on roof of NYC apartment building, c.1944 (center) Femme Maison (Woman House) 1947, ink on paper (right) The Listening One 1947-9. bronze (cast in the late 1980s) (left top) Alberto Giacometti (Swiss, 1901-1966), Suspended Ball, plaster & metal, 1930 (left below) Jean Arp (Alsace-French,1886-1966), Head with 3 Annoying Objects, 1930 Compare (right) Bourgeois, The Destruction of the Father, plaster, latex, wood & fabric, 93 X 142 X 97,” installation, 1974 :  (left top) Alberto Giacometti (Swiss, 1901-1966), Suspended Ball, plaster & metal, 1930 (left below) Jean Arp (Alsace-French,1886-1966), Head with 3 Annoying Objects, 1930 Compare (right) Bourgeois, The Destruction of the Father, plaster, latex, wood & fabric, 93 X 142 X 97,” installation, 1974 (left) Meret Oppenheim, Object (Breakfast in Fur), fur-covered cup, saucer, and spoon, 1936 (right top) Bourgeois, Janus Fleuri, bronze,10 in H , 1968 (left below) Giacometti, Woman Spoon (Femme cuillère), bronze, 56 in. H, 1926 (right below)Bourgeois, Femme Couteau (Woman Knife), carved pink marble, 9x7x12cm, 1969-70:  (left) Meret Oppenheim, Object (Breakfast in Fur), fur-covered cup, saucer, and spoon, 1936 (right top) Bourgeois, Janus Fleuri, bronze,10 in H , 1968 (left below) Giacometti, Woman Spoon (Femme cuillère), bronze, 56 in. H, 1926 (right below)Bourgeois, Femme Couteau (Woman Knife), carved pink marble, 9x7x12cm, 1969-70 (left) Traditional wunkirmian ladle, Dan people, Liberia or Cote d’Ivoire, carved to represent an individual venerated woman in her youth whose status derives from their hospitality. Compare concepts.:  (left) Traditional wunkirmian ladle, Dan people, Liberia or Cote d’Ivoire, carved to represent an individual venerated woman in her youth whose status derives from their hospitality. Compare concepts. Giacometti Bourgeois MoMA NYC permanent collection installation 2006 showing Bourgeois’ Quarantania, 1948, painted wood, with Wilfredo Lam’s 1943 Jungle:  MoMA NYC permanent collection installation 2006 showing Bourgeois’ Quarantania, 1948, painted wood, with Wilfredo Lam’s 1943 Jungle Bourgeois, two cells from Passages Dangereux, mixed media installation, 1997:  Bourgeois, two cells from Passages Dangereux, mixed media installation, 1997 Slide29:  Bourgeois, Spider, steel and mixed media, 1996 Slide30:  Bourgeois, Maman, 35 ft H, Tate London, 1999 Andrea Zittel (US, b. 1965) with Wagon Station, 2005 (right) at A-Z West near Joshua Tree, California:  Andrea Zittel (US, b. 1965) with Wagon Station, 2005 (right) at A-Z West near Joshua Tree, California Zittel, A-Z Homestead Unit, 2001:  Zittel, A-Z Homestead Unit, 2001 Zittel, A-Z Escape Vehicles, 2005:  Zittel, A-Z Escape Vehicles, 2005 Zittel, 2007 MoCA Los Angeles exhibition showing efficiency units and charts:  Zittel, 2007 MoCA Los Angeles exhibition showing efficiency units and charts Hatoum, Light at the End, 1989, London, iron frame and six electric heating elements:  Hatoum, Light at the End, 1989, London, iron frame and six electric heating elements Slide36:  Franz von Stuck, Sin, 1893 Femme Fatale Mona Hatoum (Palestinian, born Lebanon, 1952), Light Sentence (two different times), 1992, wire mesh lockers, slow-moving motorized light bulb, 198 x 185 x 490 cm:  Mona Hatoum (Palestinian, born Lebanon, 1952), Light Sentence (two different times), 1992, wire mesh lockers, slow-moving motorized light bulb, 198 x 185 x 490 cm Hatoum, Corps Etranger (Foreign Body), video installation, 1997 :  Hatoum, Corps Etranger (Foreign Body), video installation, 1997 Rachel Whiteread (British b. 1963) House [East London], 1993-4:  Rachel Whiteread (British b. 1963) House [East London], 1993-4 Rachel Whiteread, House, 1993, (left) before and after casting (below) casting process:  Rachel Whiteread, House, 1993, (left) before and after casting (below) casting process Slide41:  Demolition of House on January 11, 1993 Rachel Whiteread, Demolished C: Trowbridge Estate, London E9; Hannington Point; Hilmarton Point; Deverill Point; June 1995 1996 Demolished documents the destruction of tower blocks in three different housing estates in Hackney, East London, between 1993 and 1995, “‘something that is going to be completely forgotten... the detritus of our culture.”:  Rachel Whiteread, Demolished C: Trowbridge Estate, London E9; Hannington Point; Hilmarton Point; Deverill Point; June 1995 1996 Demolished documents the destruction of tower blocks in three different housing estates in Hackney, East London, between 1993 and 1995, “‘something that is going to be completely forgotten... the detritus of our culture.” Whiteread, Untitled (Stairs), mixed media, 3750 x 220 x 5800 mm , 2001 (compare left) Bruce Nauman, A Cast of the Space Under My Chair, 1965-68:  Whiteread, Untitled (Stairs), mixed media, 3750 x 220 x 5800 mm , 2001 (compare left) Bruce Nauman, A Cast of the Space Under My Chair, 1965-68 Whiteread, Embankment, Tate Modern Turbine Hall, London, 2005-2006 14,000 translucent polyethylene white cubes cast from cardboard boxes in a gallery 500 feet long:  Whiteread, Embankment, Tate Modern Turbine Hall, London, 2005-2006 14,000 translucent polyethylene white cubes cast from cardboard boxes in a gallery 500 feet long Whiteread, Embankment, Tate Modern Turbine hall installation, 2005-2006:  Whiteread, Embankment, Tate Modern Turbine hall installation, 2005-2006 Doris Salcedo (Colombian b.1958 ), Unland, 1995-18; installation view, Site Santa Fe. Each of the three works was formed by combining two mismatched table halves into one unit. Taking over a year to complete each sculpture, the artist incorporated organic and domestic materials--human hair, silk, and a tiny metal bed:  Doris Salcedo (Colombian b.1958 ), Unland, 1995-18; installation view, Site Santa Fe. Each of the three works was formed by combining two mismatched table halves into one unit. Taking over a year to complete each sculpture, the artist incorporated organic and domestic materials--human hair, silk, and a tiny metal bed Thousands of tiny holes are woven by hand with hair and thread Detail with doll bed Doris Salcedo, Defiant (detail), SFMoMA installation, 1992-2004, shoes, animal fiber, and surgical thread:  Doris Salcedo, Defiant (detail), SFMoMA installation, 1992-2004, shoes, animal fiber, and surgical thread Salcedo, Untitled, 1995, wooden furniture, cement, hair and domestic materials:  Salcedo, Untitled, 1995, wooden furniture, cement, hair and domestic materials Eva Hesse (German (Jewish)-American 1936 -1970, 34 years) Minimalism – Post-Minimalism (and Proto-Feminism):  Eva Hesse (German (Jewish)-American 1936 -1970, 34 years) Minimalism – Post-Minimalism (and Proto-Feminism) “I remember I wanted to get to non art, non connotive [sic], non anthropomorphic, non geometric, non, nothing. . . . question how and why in putting it together? Can it be different each time? Why not? How to achieve by not Making? It’s all in that.” - Hesse Hesse in NYC studio with Rope Piece 1969-1970 Eva Hesse Metronomic Irregularity, sculpt metal on wood, drilled and threaded with cotton-covered wire, 12 x 18 x 2 in., 1966. First of a series with two subsequent versions. The second was 4 x 20 ft. Dialectics of minimalist grid and serial form with “chaos” and subjective “absurdity” of the expressionist wires :  Eva Hesse Metronomic Irregularity, sculpt metal on wood, drilled and threaded with cotton-covered wire, 12 x 18 x 2 in., 1966. First of a series with two subsequent versions. The second was 4 x 20 ft. Dialectics of minimalist grid and serial form with “chaos” and subjective “absurdity” of the expressionist wires Hesse, Hang Up, acrylic on wood, cloth, steel, 1966 (detail lower right) notebook page showing Hang Up and other sculptures, 1965-66 :  Hesse, Hang Up, acrylic on wood, cloth, steel, 1966 (detail lower right) notebook page showing Hang Up and other sculptures, 1965-66 The absurd (left) Hesse in New York apartment in 1966 holding Ingeminate (right) Hesse, Ingeminate 1965, surgical hose, papier-mâché, cord and sprayed enamel over inflated balloons:  (left) Hesse in New York apartment in 1966 holding Ingeminate (right) Hesse, Ingeminate 1965, surgical hose, papier-mâché, cord and sprayed enamel over inflated balloons Slide54:  Robert Mapplethorpe photo of Louise Bourgeois with Fillette, 1982 Hesse, 1966 Eva Hesse, No Title, 1966, ink wash and pencil, 11 3/4 x 9 in. “If something is absurd, it’s more absurd to repeat it.” :  Eva Hesse, No Title, 1966, ink wash and pencil, 11 3/4 x 9 in. “If something is absurd, it’s more absurd to repeat it.” Eva Hesse (left) Accession II 1967 galvanized steel, rubber tubing, c. 30” square Hesse with Accession II in 1968:  Eva Hesse (left) Accession II 1967 galvanized steel, rubber tubing, c. 30” square Hesse with Accession II in 1968 Hesse, Sans II, 1968, fiberglass polyester resin 5units each 38 in H:  Hesse, Sans II, 1968, fiberglass polyester resin 5units each 38 in H Donald Judd, Untitled, 1964 Hesse, Repetition Nineteen III, fiberglass and polyester resin, 1968 compare Carl Andre (right), Twelfth Copper Corner, 1975:  Hesse, Repetition Nineteen III, fiberglass and polyester resin, 1968 compare Carl Andre (right), Twelfth Copper Corner, 1975 Hesse, Untitled, 1970. Fiberglass over polyethylene over aluminum wire. 7 units each 78 in. x 40 in. Berkeley Art Museum:  Hesse, Untitled, 1970. Fiberglass over polyethylene over aluminum wire. 7 units each 78 in. x 40 in. Berkeley Art Museum Hesse, Contingent, 8 units, fiberglass and latex over cheesecloth, 1968 Post-Minimalist rejection of Minimalism’s mechanical rigidities for psychological expressivity of materials and form. Wanted the impermanence of latex.:  Hesse, Contingent, 8 units, fiberglass and latex over cheesecloth, 1968 Post-Minimalist rejection of Minimalism’s mechanical rigidities for psychological expressivity of materials and form. Wanted the impermanence of latex. Hesse, Untitled (Rope Piece), latex over rope, string and wire, two strands, dimensions vary, 1970:  Hesse, Untitled (Rope Piece), latex over rope, string and wire, two strands, dimensions vary, 1970 Studio installation Compare Eva Hesse, 1969, with Marcel Duchamp, Sixteen Miles of String, 1942, part of Duchamp’s installation for the First Papers of Surrealism, Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of this Century gallery, NYC:  Compare Eva Hesse, 1969, with Marcel Duchamp, Sixteen Miles of String, 1942, part of Duchamp’s installation for the First Papers of Surrealism, Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of this Century gallery, NYC Lygia Clark (Brazil, 1920-1988) Rio de Janeiro 1958 :  Lygia Clark (Brazil, 1920-1988) Rio de Janeiro 1958 (left) Lygia Clark, Relief Painting with Yellow Square, oil, 30 in.H, 1957 Brazilian Neoconcretism (right) compare: Kasimir Malevich, Suprematism, White on White, 1918:  (left) Lygia Clark, Relief Painting with Yellow Square, oil, 30 in.H, 1957 Brazilian Neoconcretism (right) compare: Kasimir Malevich, Suprematism, White on White, 1918 Lygia Clark, Sundial, 1960, 3 views, Neoconcretism compare with (lower right) Max Bill, Tripartite Unity, (a Möbius) Concretism, 1947-8:  Lygia Clark, Sundial, 1960, 3 views, Neoconcretism compare with (lower right) Max Bill, Tripartite Unity, (a Möbius) Concretism, 1947-8 Lygia Clark, Machine Animal (Bicho), 1962, aluminum, 55x65, Sao Paulo:  Lygia Clark, Machine Animal (Bicho), 1962, aluminum, 55x65, Sao Paulo Lygia Clark, Rubber Grub, 1964 (1986), rubber, 56 in.H Museo de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro:  Lygia Clark, Rubber Grub, 1964 (1986), rubber, 56 in.H Museo de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro Lygia Clark, Mandala, from the series, Collective Body, 1969, elastic bands linking people at their wrists or ankles:  Lygia Clark, Mandala, from the series, Collective Body, 1969, elastic bands linking people at their wrists or ankles Lygia Clark, Air & Stone (Multiple) 1966, inflated plastic bag and stone:  Lygia Clark, Air & Stone (Multiple) 1966, inflated plastic bag and stone (left) Lygia Clark, Mask with Mirrors, 1967; (below) Dialogue, 1968 The mask holds small movable mirrors in front of the eyes, juxtaposing and fracturing reflections of the self and the surrounding world. (right) Clark, Sensorial Gloves, 1968. Part of Nostalgia of the Body series. Gloves are made of various materials, sizes and textures. Participants use the many combinations of gloves and balls of different sizes, textures and weights, and then hold the balls again with bare hands. Purpose is to rediscover touch.:  (left) Lygia Clark, Mask with Mirrors, 1967; (below) Dialogue, 1968 The mask holds small movable mirrors in front of the eyes, juxtaposing and fracturing reflections of the self and the surrounding world. (right) Clark, Sensorial Gloves, 1968. Part of Nostalgia of the Body series. Gloves are made of various materials, sizes and textures. Participants use the many combinations of gloves and balls of different sizes, textures and weights, and then hold the balls again with bare hands. Purpose is to rediscover touch. Lygia Clark, Individual Therapy with Relational Objects, Rio de Janeiro, 1975:  Lygia Clark, Individual Therapy with Relational Objects, Rio de Janeiro, 1975 Lygia Clark and Helio Oiticica, Dialogue for Hands, 1966, elastic Möbius band “Helio and I are like a glove. He is the outside of the glove, very much linked to the exterior world. I am the inside. And the two of us exist from the moment there is a hand which puts on the glove” Clark http://www.cut-the-knot.org/do_you_know/moebius.avi:  Lygia Clark and Helio Oiticica, Dialogue for Hands, 1966, elastic Möbius band “Helio and I are like a glove. He is the outside of the glove, very much linked to the exterior world. I am the inside. And the two of us exist from the moment there is a hand which puts on the glove” Clark http://www.cut-the-knot.org/do_you_know/moebius.avi (left) Hélio Oiticica (Brazil, 1937-1980), White Crossing Red – Metaschema 1968, oil, 21 in. H, Neo-Concretism; (right) compare Piet Mondrian, Tableau, 1921, Neoplasticism:  (left) Hélio Oiticica (Brazil, 1937-1980), White Crossing Red – Metaschema 1968, oil, 21 in. H, Neo-Concretism; (right) compare Piet Mondrian, Tableau, 1921, Neoplasticism Hélio Oiticica, Spatial Relief, 1959, synthetic polymer paint on wood, 38x48x8” compare (right) Alexander Rodchenko 1891-1956, Spatial Relief, 1920, Russian Constructivism :  Hélio Oiticica, Spatial Relief, 1959, synthetic polymer paint on wood, 38x48x8” compare (right) Alexander Rodchenko 1891-1956, Spatial Relief, 1920, Russian Constructivism Helio Oiticica, Glass Bolide (Portuguese word for fireball) 4 Earth, 1964, Glass, earth, and painted gauze:  Helio Oiticica, Glass Bolide (Portuguese word for fireball) 4 Earth, 1964, Glass, earth, and painted gauze Helio Oiticica, Box Bolide, 1964, painted wood and glass, 20 in H, Rio de Janeiro:  Helio Oiticica, Box Bolide, 1964, painted wood and glass, 20 in H, Rio de Janeiro Hélio Oiticica, Tropicalia, 1967, installation for the New Brazilian Objectivity exhibition at the Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro:  Hélio Oiticica, Tropicalia, 1967, installation for the New Brazilian Objectivity exhibition at the Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro Helio Oiticica, Nildo, of the Mangueira samba group, wearing Parangolés, 1964:  Helio Oiticica, Nildo, of the Mangueira samba group, wearing Parangolés, 1964 Helio Oiticica, Mosquito of Mangueira wearing Cape 6 (Paragole 10), 1965, and dancing with Glass Bolide 5 (Homage to Mondrian), 1964:  Helio Oiticica, Mosquito of Mangueira wearing Cape 6 (Paragole 10), 1965, and dancing with Glass Bolide 5 (Homage to Mondrian), 1964 Slide80:  This entire experience into which art flows, the issue of liberty itself, of the expansion of the individual's consciousness, of the return to myth, the rediscovery of rhythm, dance, the body, the senses, which finally are what we have as weapons of direct, perceptual, participatory knowledge . . . is revolutionary in the total sense of behavior. - Oiticica The quiz on Tuesday will be on architectural sculpture, and the question will be drawn from the Gil Perry essay in Themes. :  The quiz on Tuesday will be on architectural sculpture, and the question will be drawn from the Gil Perry essay in Themes.

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