Appendix4 Hamilton Pilot Presentation

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Information about Appendix4 Hamilton Pilot Presentation
Education

Published on April 3, 2008

Author: Cajetano

Source: authorstream.com

The Business Case for Supporting Tourism in Hamilton:  The Business Case for Supporting Tourism in Hamilton Presentation to Hamilton City Council (date) Introduction:  Introduction What is tourism? It’s people who visit our community and spend money here. Same day visitors and overnight visitors. Business travel, pleasure travel, personal travel and those visiting friends and relatives. Tourism provides significant economic benefits, and economic opportunities to the community. Tourism also helps support quality of life amenities for our residents. Slide3:  The Economic Impacts of Tourism Tourism: A Key Economic Driver in Ontario (2002 data):  198,655,000 jobs. $ 19.7 billion in visitor spending. Every dollar of visitor spending generates 27¢ of taxes for all levels of government. $5.3 Billion in taxes generated – federal, provincial and municipal. Tourism: A Key Economic Driver in Ontario (2002 data) Slide5:  $ 10.6 Billion contribution to the Provincial GDP – 2.2% of the provincial economy. Tourism GDP is greater than agriculture, forestry/logging, fishing/hunting and mining industries combined. Slide6:  Tourism was the 7th largest export industry in Ontario in 2002 - $5.8 billion in exports. Ontario’s Top Export Industries: Transportation equipment. Machinery. Chemical. Computer and electronic products. Primary metals. Plastics and rubber products.manufacturing. Tourism Slide7:  Tourism in Hamilton Slide8:  3,452,000 visitors to Hamilton* in 2002. 89% of our visitors came from elsewhere in Ontario. 3% from elsewhere in Canada, 6% from the USA and 2% from overseas. $233.4 million in visitor spending in 2002. 186 tourism establishments, plus many more that receive business from visitors. * Census division 25 – Hamilton-Wentworth Regional Municipality Slide9:  Spending by Visitors – The ‘Trickle Down’ Effect Visitors Spend their Money on: Accommodation & Campgrounds Transportation including gas, car rentals, fares, car repairs Food & Beverage in Restaurants & Nightclubs Attractions, Events & Entertainment, Recreation Shopping including gifts, groceries, supplies Other Services and Facilities These Businesses Spend their Money on: Wages & Salaries Purchases: Food & Beverages Other Supplies Advertising, Insurance Repairs & Maintenance Purchase of Stock for Resale Fuel & Utilities Legal & Professional Fees Taxes to Government – Municipal, Prov’l & Federal Capital Assets & Replacement Who Benefits? Restaurants Gas Stations Farmers Retailers Taxi Drivers Lawyers Florists Dentists Grocery Stores Galleries Manufacturers Gift Shops Film Processors Drug Stores Banks Builders Municipalities Media Hardware Stores Etc. Etc. Slide11:  The 2003 World Road Cycling Championships generated an estimated economic impact of $48.3 million, and made a profit as well. It supported 410 jobs and paid salaries and wages of $9.4 million in the city. It generated $8.4 million in taxes, including almost $1 million for the City of Hamilton. More than 125,000 spectators from across Canada and the USA attended the Bell Canadian Open here in 2003. Here’s what one of our community business leaders had to say…:  Here’s what one of our community business leaders had to say… “Tourism is the lifeblood of my business. Without visitors, I doubt my sales would be half what they are today. I’m a fan!” Joe Happyguy – Owner, ‘Fine Craft and Gift Emporium’ Slide13:  Visitor Spending in (community/region) Visitor Spending in the Rest of Ontario Economic Impacts in the (Community/Region) Economic Impacts in the Rest of Ontario The Flow of Economic Impacts from Tourism Spending The full economic impact of $233 million in visitor spending in Hamilton in 2002:  The full economic impact of $233 million in visitor spending in Hamilton in 2002 Where the Taxes Went (millions):  Where the Taxes Went (millions) Here’s who receives revenue from visitors visiting our community: :  (Insert slide(s) on the types and numbers of businesses in your community/region that are in the tourism industry and others that receive revenue from visitors - and events as well). Here’s who receives revenue from visitors visiting our community: Our competitive position has been strengthened in recent years: :  (Insert information on investments made in the community in recent years in new tourism products/ services/ infrastructure). Our competitive position has been strengthened in recent years: Slide18:  Tourism is more than Economic Benefits Tourism Is a Quality Industry For Us:  Tourism Is a Quality Industry For Us Why? It brings money into the community. It supports a diverse mix of business types and sizes. It also helps support community quality of life amenities. A nice place to visit is a great place to live, and a good place to establish a business. Slide20:  Gabble Smilealot, Hamilton Real Estate Company “Tourism in Hamilton is very important to my business. Often the people I sell to have visited the city in the past and then decide to move their business here. They say the city has everything they need, and enjoy, and it’s a great place to do business too!” Slide21:  Tourism helps support our recreational and sports facilities, our arts and cultural programs, and our heritage facilities. Tourism obviously supports our community festivals and events too. Tourism is growing …:  In spite of periodic ups and downs, tourism will continue its long term growth: The baby boomers will continue to travel, and more-so. Lower costs of air travel will boost leisure travel. Powerful, affordable new tools are making tourism marketing much more effective: Internet E-marketing Relationship marketing Tourism is growing … We have what it takes to grow our tourism:  We have what it takes to grow our tourism Huge markets at our doorstep. We have the ‘critical mass’ of appealing attractions and visitor services necessary to grow our tourism. Excellent transportation links. A strong team in Tourism Hamilton. Committed partners. And we have real opportunities to grow our tourism:  And we have real opportunities to grow our tourism We have a solid competitive position in the meetings/convention market, in the leisure travel market and in the travel trade marketplace. We can attract more sporting events - our sports tourism action plan is proceeding. Other events, such as new festivals, offer opportunities for us. What we need to do…:  What we need to do… Our strategies: Strengthen our image as a destination, and our brand. Coordinate our marketing with our partners through annual marketing plans. ‘Tell our story’ through the media – to our tourism markets, and to our own citizens. Work with our tourism industry to strengthen their ‘market readiness’. Develop packages and tour programs to grow demand. And…:  And… Encourage new investment. Build and strengthen partnerships within our tourism industry. Strengthen our partnerships with SOTO, OTMPC and the CTC, and with others. Strengthen the business model and funding for Tourism Hamilton. Tourism Budgets in other Communities:  Tourism Budgets in other Communities What would happen with an extra 1% ($2.3 million) in new visitor spending in Hamilton?:  What would happen with an extra 1% ($2.3 million) in new visitor spending in Hamilton? Requires an extra 34,500 visitors to the city. Generates $1.6 million in GDP in the local economy. Sustains 31 jobs in Hamilton - full time equivalents. $855,000 in salaries in wages in Hamilton. $50,000 in municipal taxes ultimately to the City of Hamilton. Can we really make a difference? Won’t they come anyway?:  Can we really make a difference? Won’t they come anyway? Yes, we can make a difference. And no, they won’t keep coming if we don’t work at it …. Here’s what happened in Colorado! The Colorado Story - If You Don't Do It at All!:  The Colorado Story - If You Don't Do It at All! In 1993, Colorado residents voted to cancel the State's tax which had provided a budget of US$12 million annually, much of it spent on marketing campaigns to develop summer, off-season business for its resorts. The consequences: Colorado's share of domestic pleasure travel in summer dropped by 30% from 1993 to 1997. The state dropped from 1st place among states in the summer resort category in 1993, to 17th, and has not made the top 10 since. The 30% decline in market share, by 1997, had cost Colorado some US$2.4 billion in lost tourism revenues and $134 million in lost state tax revenues. What happens when you stop marketing – Hamilton’s Experience in the Meetings and Convention Travel Market:  The meetings and convention market is important to Hamilton. It provides tremendous opportunities for the City. Hamilton stopped marketing to this segment for a couple of years. Business & Convention visitors dropped from 166,000 to 147,000. Spending dropped from $37.3 million to $17.3 million, between 2000 and 2001. What happens when you stop marketing – Hamilton’s Experience in the Meetings and Convention Travel Market What we need to do…:  What we need to do… By making sure we have the best products – great experiences, quality services – and enough good marketing, we can grow our tourism. There are lots of examples of what others have accomplished. Some examples…:  Some examples… “Roots and Rivers” - Explore the Ottawa Valley’s Cultural Heritage:  A series of self-guided tour itineraries along the Ottawa, Bonnechere & Madawaska River Valleys. Ottawa Valley Cultural Heritage Tourism Corridor Project - 45+ private, not-for-profit and public sector partners joined together to develop market-ready cultural heritage tourism products. Almost 2,500 visitors in the first 6 months. Has generated increased attendance at cultural institutions. Has fostered a wide range of alliances between partners. “Roots and Rivers” - Explore the Ottawa Valley’s Cultural Heritage Rural Gardens of Grey & Bruce Counties:  A network of gardens established to “share the rate and diverse garden experiences of Grey and Bruce Counties” Started with 10 gardens – now over 40 after three years 35,000 copies annually of a four colour brochure Website with links to members’ sites The largest gardens can accommodate group tours, sell garden products or plants, have admission fees and are open for set days and hours. Membership fees cover most of the brochure and website costs. Rural Gardens of Grey & Bruce Counties Slide37:  Saint Tite - a community of 4,200, north of Trois Rivières, Quebec. Home to a leather manufacturing company that produces western boots - As a publicity strategy in 1967, the company organized a rodeo day. 2004 was the 37th Festival Western de St-Tite - a 10 day September event. More than 400,000 visitors to the community. Over $5 million in visitor spending. Total contribution to the economy is $20 million. The Festival itself has a budget of over $2.5 million! Festival Western de St-Tite, Québec The reality…:  The reality… The competition is tough. Only the strong will succeed. The rewards will go to the strong. We can be strong. We have our tourism partners on side…:  We have our tourism partners on side… (Name our leaders & champions). (insert testimonials). In Conclusion:  In Conclusion We have great opportunities in tourism. We have the team in place. We simply need (Insert what you need to be able to proceed/to be successful - the resources, their support, ??) to get the job done! Here’s what we need from you::  Here’s what we need from you: (optional slide for the ‘ask’ – what we want the audience to do) Thank You!:  Thank You!

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