Affective literacy and TEFL

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Information about Affective literacy and TEFL

Published on November 5, 2016

Author: dracle99

Source: slideshare.net

1. AFFECTIVE LITERACY AND TEFL DAVID R. COLE WESTERN SYDNEY UNIVERSITY

2. WHAT IS AN AFFECT? • Affect is the experience of feeling or emotion. Affect is a key part of the process of an organism's interaction with stimuli. The word also refers sometimes to affect display, which is "a facial, vocal, or gestural behaviour that serves as an indicator of affect” …

3. WHAT IS AFFECTIVE LITERACY? A broad range of somatic, emotive responses to reading a text. Affective literacy seeks out the life-principle, messy and complex, threading through reading activities and gestures toward bodily economies of reading and transacting texts … Amsler (2004, p. 2).

4. AFFECTIVE AND MULTIPLE LITERACIES (COLE, 2009) How does affective literacy relate to other literacies? How can affective literacy be realized as a practice? What are the principles of affective literacy? What is the pedagogy of affective literacy?

5. HOW IS AFFECTIVE LITERACY CONNECTED TO TEFL? • The expansion of texts that can be used in TEFL (though multimodality/globalisation, etc.) creates greater doubt for the teacher • All texts must be affective to create engagement • How can the TEFL teacher create affective engagement? • What are the different aspects of affectivity? • Can affect be measured? • How does affect relate to/complement cognition? • What texts are affective and why?

6. AFFECTIVE DOMAIN FROM BLOOM How does the affective domain relate to your TEFL practice? Can you discern the affective domain in your TEFL practice? How can the affective domain be enhanced/manipulated?

7. 3-LEVEL MODEL OF AFFECTIVE EDUCATION • Reaction/cure: Doing something after the problem has arisen, e.g. offering counselling to pupils who have had problems, referring pupils with problems to social services or other outside agency, supporting a child who has been bereaved, discussing and mediating after a fight. • Proaction/prevention: Doing something before the event by preparing people to cope with anticipated situations, e.g. assertiveness training; drugs and Aids programmes, discussing the issue of death and loss with the class, perhaps in relation to the death of pets. • Enhancement: Positive encouragement of development, not primarily driven by the desirability of prevention, but by the aim of developing the whole person, e.g. role play, interpersonal skills, work decision making opportunities in class, working on self esteem, offering praise and encouragement. • Lang, Katz & Menezes (1998, p.13).

8. AFFECTIVE PRACTICE • Invite collaborative, self-reflective analysis of emotions and critical analysis of cultural, gendered differences in emotions and how the rules of emotional conduct maintain social hierarchies. • Provide students with an opportunity to examine emotional experience within a context not usually provided in schools or elsewhere. • Allow teachers to explore their own emotional experience and develop conscientious philosophies of emotion to inform their pedagogies and interaction. • Allow young people to articulate and possibly develop an increased vocabulary, so that they can creatively examine their ethical relations with others and choose for themselves modes of integrating emotions in their lives. • (Boler, 1999, p.81).

9. THE ARRIVAL How does this picture make you feel? What language can you use to describe it? How could you relate to this picture? What is the sensation of this picture?

10. THE ARRIVAL (II) How does this picture make you feel? What language can you use to describe it? How could you relate to this picture? What is the sensation of this picture?

11. HOW ARE IMAGES RELATED TO AFFECT? Find 10 images Describe the related affect for each image How do the images make you feel? How are images, affects and language connected? Does everyone have the same response?

12. POLITICAL AFFECT How does this picture make you feel? What is the message? Where is this picture located? How could you use this picture for your TEFL class? Can you think of Taiwanese example s of this type of art (graffiti)?

13. POLITICAL AFFECT (II) How does this picture make you feel? What is the message? Where is this picture located? How could you use this picture for your TEFL class? Can you think of Taiwanese example s of this type of art (graffiti)?

14. AFFECT AND STORYTELLING What makes for a good story? How can we teach our students to be good story tellers? What do you feel when listening to a good story? Are there rules for storytelling? How does storytelling and TEFL relate to one another? Are there inter-cultural elements to storytelling?

15. FIGURES OF SPEECH How do different figures of speech make you feel? What is the affect of these figures of speech? Write out one textual example for each figure of speech How doe you teach figures of speech in your TEFL practice?

16. HUMOUR Does this cartoon make you laugh? Why is it funny? How does humour make you feel? What are the affects of humour? Are you a funny teacher? Can you become closer to your class through humour? What does humour depend on? Is there inter-cultural humour. How specific/dispersed is it? When should you use humour?

17. CARTOONS What cartoons can you use for your TEFL classrooms? How do they create affects? How do cartoons make you feel? What are the advantages/disadvantages of using cartoons? What other types of cartoons are there, e.g. Manga … Find 5 cartoons for your TEFL classroom/decide how you will use them. Describe the affects.

18. AFFECTIVE PEDAGOGY How do you know when your pedagogy is affective? How does affect relate to inclusion/differentiation/assessment? How affective is the curriculum? How can you become more affective as a TEFL teacher? What are the most important aspects of affective practice?

19. FURTHER READING • Amsler, M. (2004). Affective literacy: Gestures of reading in the later Middle Ages. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, retrieved November 8, 2005, from: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/ essays_in_medieval_studies/v018/18.1amsler.html • Boler, M. (1999). Feeling Power: Emotions and Education. New York: Routledge. • Cole, D.R. (2009). Deleuzian Affective Literacy for Teaching Literature: A Literary Perspective on Multiple Literacies Theory. In D. Masny & D.R. Cole (Eds.), Multiple Literacies Theory: A Deleuzian Perspective (pp. 63-79. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers. • Cole, D.R. (2008). Explorations of affective literacy amongst middle school English teachers. Literacy Learning: The Middle Years, 16 (3) 44-56. • Cole, D.R. (2011). The actions of affect in Deleuze - Others using language and the language that we make … Educational Philosophy and Theory. Volume 43, Issue 6, August 549-561. • Cole, D.R. (2009). The power of emotional factors in English teaching. Power and Education. 1 (1) 57-70 • Cole, D.R., & Yang, GY. (2008). Affective literacy for TESOL teachers in China. Prospect, Volume 23, Number 1, 37-45 • Lang, P., Katz, Y., & Menezes I. (1998). Affective education. A comparative view. London and New York: Cassell.

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