A NEW ENGLISH COURSE Book 3

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Information about A NEW ENGLISH COURSE Book 3
Education

Published on February 20, 2008

Author: Lucianna

Source: authorstream.com

A NEW ENGLISH COURSE:  A NEW ENGLISH COURSE (BOOK 3) Teaching Outline:  Teaching Outline 1. The emphasis of Book 3 2. General Reading Skills 3. An introduction to the composition of Book 3. Unit 1:  Unit 1 TEXT I My First Job 1. Pre-reading Questions 2. The Main Idea 3. The guidelines for skimming. 4. Language Points 5. Vocabulary 6. Questions Answers Unit 1:  Unit 1 2. The main idea of this text is( ):The writer was interviewed by the headmaster of a school and was offered a job that was none too pleasant. Unit 1:  Unit 1 4. Language Points ①.Being short of money and wanting to do something useful,… The—ing participle phrase is used as an adverbial to denote cause or reason.Being short of money and wanting to do something useful can be changed into an adverbial clause of cause or reason: As I was short of money and wanted to do something useful,… More examples: Being in poor health and lacking in teaching experience,he was dismissed. Not having his telephone number,I couldn't ring him back. Unit 1:  Unit 1 ②.Description of a person 1)Forehead:A person's forehead can be large,high,low,broad,narrow,domed or re-treating/receding (going back). 2)Moustache:A man may grow a moustache,which can be close-cropped,drooping (bending downward) or pointed. 3)Eyes:A person may have bloodshot eyes,bulging (curve outward) eyes,prominent eyes,close-set eyes, dark eyes,deep-set eyes,or sunken (to a lower level) eyes. Unit 1:  Unit 1 4)Hair:Hair may be short,long,thin,thick,straight,curled,curly,wavy,sparse (thinly scattered),unkempt (untidy) , disheveled (uncombed),luxuriant (strong In growth), permed (short for permanent waves). The color of hair can be:black,dark,red,grey,silver,chestnut,white,brown, fair, blond(e),golden,jet-black (dark-black),dyed. Some men lose their hair and go bald. Unit 1:  Unit 1 5) Figure:A person's figure may be:slender,stout(fat,plump),stooping (bending),thin(lean)slim. 6)Height:A person may be:tall,short,of medium(average)height. Unit 1:  Unit 1 ③.He was wearing a tweed suit—one felt somehow he had always worn fabric with a rough surface of two or more colors or shades(粗花呢) Some other materials which people use to make suits include: flannel(法兰绒),serge(哗叽),gabardine(华达呢,轧别丁) Unit 1:  Unit 1 1.Awkward 2.Depressed 3. Dreary 4. Grunt 5. Vital 6. Appall 7. Diffidently 8. Ultimate 1. inconvenient and uncomfortable 2. sad;low in spirits 3. gloomy;cheerless 4. make a short,deep,rough sound(like a pig),showing dissatisfaction 5. very necessary 6. shock deeply;fill with fear 7. timidly 8. greatest;extreme Unit 1:  Unit 1 Questions 1.What are big staring sash-windows? ①.They are very large windows,so large that they look like people's wide open eyes. Unit 1:  Unit 1 2.What is the implied meaning of “they struggled to survive the dust and fumes from a busy main road”? ②.They (the four evergreen shrubs)did their best to remain alive in spite of the dust and smoke from a main road with heavy traffic. Unit 1:  Unit 1 3.Describe the appearance of the headmaster in your own words. ③.He was short and stout.He grew a moustache which was pale reddish yellow in color.His forehead was covered with freckles.And he was almost bald. Unit 1:  Unit 1 4.What impression did the hall give the writer? ④.It was a narrow,dim(unlighted)hall which had an offensive odor of dried up cabbage.The walls,once painted in cream color,had darkened to the color of margarine and in a few places were marked with ink stains.Silence prevailed in the hall. Unit 1:  Unit 1 5.Why do you think the headmaster had “bloodshot eyes”? ⑤.Perhaps he liked to have a drop too much. Unit 1:  Unit 1 6.What kind of class was the writer asked to teach? ⑥.It was a class of twenty-four boys who were from seven to thirteen years of age. Unit 1:  Unit 1 7.Why was the writer diffident when asking about his salary? ⑦.Because he had little self-confidence as he was young and it was the first time he had an interview.Besides,perhaps he was not used to asking about money matters. Unit 1:  Unit 1 8.What is meant by “This was the last straw”? ⑧.The phrase “the last straw” comes from the saying “It is the last straw that breaks the camel's back".What the saying means is that “straw is very light in weight,but if you increase the burden on the camel's back straw by straw,eventually you will put on his back one straw too many,and that last straw will break his back.When used figuratively, “the last straw” means “an addition to a set of troubles which makes them unbearable”.Here in the text,the writer regards his having to work under a woman as an additional source of annoyance which would make the job all the more intolerable. Unit 1:  Unit 1 9.What was the young man’s impression of the headmaster? How did he arrive at this? ⑨.His impression was unfavorable.To the writer,the headmaster was a short,stout,freckle- fore-headed,bald man,with a big unpleasant paunch (belly).As the headmaster was not as neatly dressed as a gentleman was supposed to be,he gave the impression of having always worn the same suit.Probably he was badly off.He received the young man with a look of surprised disapproval and during the whole interview he assumed an air of condescension (superiority),which was quite annoying to the young man.Moreover,the headmaster made great demands on the young man,while he himself did not seem to know much about teaching. Unit 1:  Unit 1 10.Tell what you know about the young man. ⑩.The writer was a young school leaver waiting to enter university.He was badly in need of money and he seemed to be a man of vitality and energy.He wanted to do something useful that could bring him some money.He did not have much experience in life,nor in teaching.He looked very bashful,having little self-confidence.Fearing that he might not get the job,he was careful about what he said.He had to do what he did not like to do. To make matters worse,he had to work under a woman,which was the most humiliating thing to a man of his age,but whether he liked it or not,he had to take the job. Unit 1:  Unit 1 TEXT II The Interview Questions 1. For what purpose do you think Blakey went to the interview? 2. Why did Blakey feel uneasy when he was asked what had prompted him to want to change to medicine? 3. Why did one of the interviewers say that Blakey was capable of a change of heart? And how did Blakey take the question? Unit 1:  Unit 1 4. What was the reason that Blakey gave for leaving University without taking a degree? What did the interviewers think of his reason? 5. Do you think Blakey was well-prepared to answer the question about his financial status? Give your reasons. Unit 1:  Unit 1 6. Why did Blakey at first have a sense of guilt,and why was he then stung by a sense of inadequacy? 7. What do you think was the outcome of the interview? Why do you think so? Unit 1:  Unit 1 Interaction Activities Making Preparations for an Interview Unit 1:  Unit 1 2.Details that the interviewer is interested in: certificate of education/diploma/degrees/major field of study foreign languages work experience as an interpreter/a clerk/a secretary/a tourist guide likes and dislikes personal status(single or married)/children Unit 1:  Unit 1 Paragraph Writing: The incidents in a narrative are usually told in the order in which they occurred.Therefore,the sentence I never met Aunt Helen until the day when Mother sent me over with a thermos flask of chicken soup serves as the topic sentence,and the following are the details: — the purpose of going there — the description of Aunt Helen — the pleasant atmosphere — the writer’s impression All these details adhere to (stick to) the topic sentence to make the paragraph complete. Unit 2:  Unit 2 General Reading Skills –The Reading Environment ⑴ Where to read Lighting Ventilation Reading Position Focal Distance Distractions Unit 2:  Unit 2 ⑵ How to Read an Academic Text How to skim read the title of the passage carefully Look carefully at the headings and other organizational clues 1. major headings and subheadings 2. italicized words and phrases 3.lists of points set off by numbers 4. redundancy or repetition Unit 2:  Unit 2 TEXT I Unwillingly on Holiday 1. Pre-reading Questions 2. The Main Idea 3. Language Points 4. Vocabulary 5. Questions Answers Unit 2:  Unit 2 The best choice is(2):Tom Long was unhappy about being sent to his uncle's because his brother was down with the measles. Unit 2:  Unit 2 Language Points: 1. Some people find this an exciting new experience;others face it with dread.-- Experience in this context is a countable noun.It refers to “some event that has happened to a person or an activity a person has taken part in.” Cf:…that without a degree and with no experience of teaching my chances of landing the job were slim.(Unit I,Text I) Unit 2:  Unit 2 Here,experience is an uncountable noun referring to knowledge or skill which comes from practice rather than from books. More examples: Tell us about your unusual and exciting experiences in Beijing. He is a well-liked teacher with a lot of experience. Unit 2:  Unit 2 2.I'd rather have had measles with Peter. Would rather is a set phrase to be followed by an infinitive without to.The structure is would rather…than. The sentence in its complete form is: I'd rather have had measles with Peter than go somewhere else on holiday. More examples: Unit 2:  Unit 2 He would rather stay at home reading than go to the movie. I would rather walk all these stairs up than wait for the lift to go up. Would rather can also be followed by a clause introduced by that.Then the verb should be in the past,e.g., He would rather(that)he didn't have to teach the children at three different levels. They would rather(that)I came tomorrow. Unit 2:  Unit 2 3.If only he’d beat me.--How I wish he would beat me!If only is often used to introduce an exclamation expressing an unfulfilled condition at present,in the past or in the future.The verb is generally in the past or the past perfect. More examples: If only I had a chance to live my childhood once again. If only I had applied for the job. If only she had had a lot in common with me. Unit 2:  Unit 2 1. bear 2.gaze 3.bitterly 4.spoil 5.strictly 6.hostile 7.cooped up 8.poky Unit 2:  Unit 2 Questions 1.What is a “rough patch”? 1. It is a very small piece of land with an uneven,irregular surface on which it is not easy to walk. Unit 2:  Unit 2 2.What is the implied meaning of the sentence “Tom gazed,and then turned back into the house” ? 2. The literal meaning of the sentence is "Tom kept his look fixed on everything in the small garden…”or “Tom looked long and earnestly at everything in the small garden,and after that he went into the house.”The implied meaning is that Tom could hardly tear himself away from everything in the small garden,which had given him so much fun and joy in previous holidays. Unit 2:  Unit 2 3.Why did Tom call up at the foot of the stairs instead of going upstairs to say good-bye to Pete? 3. He didn't go upstairs to say good-bye to Peter,but shouted “Good-bye,Peter” instead,because Peter was down with the measles,which is a highly infectious disease.So Tom had to stay away from Peter. Unit 2:  Unit 2 4 .What is meant by “He put his hand out for it” ? 4.It means “He held out his hand to take his suitcase.” Unit 2:  Unit 2 5 .What did Tom's mother mean by “it's not nice for you to be rushed away like this to avoid the measles.”? 5.Tom's mother admitted that it was not pleasant for Tom to be sent away in such haste so as not to contract the measles. Unit 2:  Unit 2 6 .Why did Tom‘s mother whisper something to Tom? 6.Because she wanted Tom to be prepared for the new surroundings so that he could behave properly and get on well with everybody in his uncle's home. Besides,she did not want to be overheard by Uncle Alan,who was sitting in his car not far away. Unit 2:  Unit 2 7 .What did Mrs. Long mean by “There is、little room in the house when there is illness”? 7.Most probably Tom and Peter shared the same room.But now Peter had to be separated from Tom because of the measles.When there was a patient with an infectious disease at home,Mrs. Long found that there wasn’t enough space in the house. Unit 2:  Unit 2 8 .Why did Mrs. Long raise her hands in a gesture of despair? 8.Peter should have remained in bed but he got up and went up to the window to wave good-bye to Tom. Seeing this, Mrs. Long felt that she had to persuade Peter to stay in bed.She raised her hand to tell him so,but she knew it was no use.So she hurried indoors. Unit 2:  Unit 2 9 .What is meant by “Mother and Father would say I did right”? 9. It means “Mother and Father would say I did the right thing.”In other words,his mother and father would think that it was right for Tom to run away home. Unit 2:  Unit 2 TEXT II April Fools' Day Questions 1.Have you ever heard of April Fools' Day before? 2.From the notes written by various English children,what impression do you get of April Fools’ Day? 3.What do you think of playing jokes on people on the first of April?Do you think it interesting or meaningless or harmful or harmless? Give reasons for your answer. Unit 2:  Unit 2 Interaction Activities An Unforgettable Experience Suggestions: The unforgettable experiences might be: 1.working as a carpenter and making a bookcase 2.swimming for 2 kilometers in a river without stopping to take a rest 3.working as a lifeguard in a swimming pool/at the seaside Unit 2:  Unit 2 4.picnicking in the woods 5.having an outing with former middle school friends Sentence frames for supporting ideas: It was the first time I had ever… It taught me that… It made me realize that… Unit 2:  Unit 2 Paragraph Writing The opening sentence tells about Jim's expectation on returning home.But things did not turn out as he had expected.He becomes angry and his anger is worked up step by step with a succession of unbearable events. The following words/phrases might be used to express anger: Unit 2:  Unit 2 —of ail days…choose to… —rage swelled up —if…would have…but…too…to —…should have…at least… —…just too much —...tears of... welled up... fuming eyes —…the last straw… —to storm into… —to fling…with…and all Unit 2:  Unit 2 Letter Writing In answering a letter from a friend,one may begin with an introductory sentence as follows: A.For a prompt answer: 1.I was very happy to receive your letter of 7th March. 2.Thank you for your letter of 4th July written from Beijing. 3.I had been looking forward to hearing from you and you can imagine my pleasure when I got your letter. Unit 2:  Unit 2 5.I was so glad to get your letter of May 5th and to learn that all's well with you. 6.It was a great pleasure to get your long letter telling me about your recent experience. 9.After such a long wait,at last I got your message. Unit 2:  Unit 2 B.For a delayed answer: 4.I hope you can forgive me for putting off writing you for so many days. 7.I'm sorry that I did not write you as soon as 1 got your letter but I've very busy. 8.I regret that it took me a long time to answer the questions in your last letter. 10.Please forgive me for having delayed my answer to your letter. Unit 2:  Unit 2 Diamond-shaped poems with 5 lines War by Saud War Sad, destructive Killing, injuring, destroying A thing that kills life. Terminator Unit 2:  Unit 2 River by Miki River Clear, wonderful Slapping, whirling, flowing The river is cold. Water Answer the question: What is the relationship between the first and last lines? Unit 3:  Unit 3 General Reading Skills Reading critically Making observations Interpreting your observations How to look for ways of thinking Some Practical Tips Unit 3:  Unit 3 When you read closely,scan the text to observe facts and details relevant to your purpose. Unit 3:  Unit 3 You should approach critical reading like this: don’t read looking only or primarily for information do read looking for ways of thinking and arguing about the subject matter Unit 3:  Unit 3 1.First determine the central claim (s)or purpose of the text (its thesis). 2.Begin to make some judgments about the context of the text. 3.Think about the writers assumptions--who and what the author is, how the author is seeking to persuade,who is paying them. 4.Identify the kinds of reasoning the text employs. 5.Examine the evidence(the supporting facts,examples,etc.)the text employs. 6.Critical reading often involves evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of argument. Unit 3:  Unit 3 1.Critical reading occurs after some preliminary processes of reading. 2.When highlighting a text or taking notes from it,teach yourself to highlight arguments:those places in a text where an author explains the analysis,the concepts and how they are used,and how the conclusions are arrived at. Unit 3:  Unit 3 TEXT I Three Sundays in a Week 1. Pre-reading Questions 2. The Main Idea 3. Backgrounds 4. Language Points 5. Vocabulary 6. Questions Answers Unit 3:  Unit 3 Edgar Allen Poe (1809-1849), American poet, a master of the horror tale, credited with practically inventing the detective story. Unit 3:  Unit 3 Cape Horn was first rounded by the Dutch expedition on January 26, 1616, They named it Kaap Hoorn after the city of Hoorn. Located off the southern tip of mainland South America. The Cape lies within Chilean territorial waters, and the Chilean Navy supports a lighthouse keeper and his family. Unit 3:  Unit 3 Cape of Good Hope: also called  Cape Province,    former province of South Africa, occupying the southern extremity of the African continent. Cape Province comprised all of southern and western South Africa. It was the largest of the four traditional provinces and contained more than half the country's total area. Unit 3:  Unit 3 Language Points 1.He had been looking at the others as though they were mad. And here Kate ended the quarrel by jumping up,as if she had a new thought. As though/as if--as it would be if(something were true). The phrases are used to introduce adverbial clauses of manner. More examples: He acts as if he knew nothing about it. They talked as though they had traveled round the Cape of Good Hope. It looks as if it is going to rain at once. Unit 3:  Unit 3 2.…my uncle roared,purple with anger. More examples: green with envy,ash-white with terror Unit 3:  Unit 3 1. steer 2. queer 3. extraordinary 4. concurrence 5. Voyage 6. Positive 7. feebly 8. particular Unit 3:  Unit 3 Questions I.What is meant by “They had circled it in a year and come back to England?” 1.It means that they had traveled around the world for a year and now had just come back to England. Unit 3:  Unit 3 2.What is the meaning of “…tried to gain our point indirectly"? 2.The phrase means“…tried to get what we aimed at”-- i.e.,to talk Uncle Rumgudgeon into believing that three Sundays could occur in a week,-- in a roundabout way. Unit 3:  Unit 3 3.Why does the writer use “up“ in the sentence“…we invited the pair up to meet my uncle"?Can the word up be omitted? 3.Here the sentence means “we invited Kate’s two sailor friends to the place where we were,that is,to the old man‘s home.”If up is omitted,the meaning of the sentence will not be very clear. Unit 3:  Unit 3 4.How do you explain the sentence “Here I am just a year after leaving England"? 4.The explanation is “It is just a year since I left England and I am back again.” Unit 3:  Unit 3 5.When does a person become “purple with anger”? 5.Purple is a dark color which is a blend of red and blue.Usually when a person is extremely angry,his face will turn purple.Here it shows that the writer's uncle was so angry and agitated that his face turned deep crimson. Unit 3:  Unit 3 6.What is meant by “a bit of mock thought”?Why did Smitherton act as if he had a moment of mock thought? 6.Captain Smitherton was pretending to be thinking for a while.This way he would appear to be more convincing than otherwise,that is,he looked as if he had thought out the truth after some serious thinking. Unit 3:  Unit 3 TEXT II The Bermuda Triangle One of the legends of the sea that has persisted even to today is the story of the Bermuda Triangle. Here ships and airplanes seem to disappear more often than in other parts of the ocean. Usually the craft are never seen again, which is not too surprising in an area noted for hurricanes and high waves. The Bermuda Triangle covers an area from the southern Virginia coast to Bermuda to the Bahaman Islands. Unit 3:  Unit 3 The Bermuda Triangle Unit 3:  Unit 3 Role-play A Discussion on the Bermuda Triangle Interaction Activities A Lucky Survivor Unit 3:  Unit 3 About the Bermuda Triangle : The "Bermuda or Devil's Triangle” is an imaginary area located off the southeastern Atlantic coast of the United States, which is noted for a high incidence of unexplained losses of ships, small boats, and aircraft. Unit 3:  Unit 3 Countless theories attempting to explain the many disappearances have been offered throughout the history of the area. The most practical seem to be environmental and those citing human error. The majority of disappearances can be attributed to the area's unique environmental features. First, the "Devil's Triangle" is one of the two places on earth that a magnetic compass does point towards true north. Normally it points toward magnetic north. The difference between the two is known as compass variation. The amount of variation changes by as much as 20 degrees as one circumnavigates the earth. If this compass variation or error is not compensated (make a suitable payment) for, a navigator could find himself far off course and in deep trouble. Unit 3:  Unit 3 Another environmental factor is the character of the Gulf Stream. It is extremely swift and turbulent and can quickly erase any evidence of a disaster. The unpredictable Caribbean-Atlantic weather pattern also plays its role. Unit 3:  Unit 3 Gulf Stream Warm current of the North Atlantic Ocean, flowing in a generally northeastern direction from the Straits of Florida to the Grand Banks, east and south of Newfoundland. Unit 3:  Unit 3 Caribbean Unit 3:  Unit 3 The absence of bodies might be explained by the fact that the waters are infested (full of) with sharks (鲨鱼) and barracuda (梭鱼). Unit 3:  Unit 3 The Liferaft Unit 3:  Unit 3 Diamond-shaped poems with 7 lines Winter Rainy, cold Skiing, skating, sledding Mountains, wind, breeze, ocean Swimming, surfing, scuba (水中呼吸器) diving Sunny, hot Summer Unit 3:  Unit 3 Diamond-shaped poems with 7 lines Man Brilliant, perfect Working, learning, earning Beer, car, mirror, make-up Speaking, speaking, speaking Furious, exhausted Woman Unit 3:  Unit 3 Diamond-shaped poems with 7 line Studies Unhappy, difficult Boring, succeeding, sleeping Library, pencil, card, outside Interesting, exciting, failing Happy, easy Play Unit 3:  Unit 3 The structural form Line 1: Winter = 1 NOUN Line 2: Rainy, cold = 2 ADJECTIVES Line 3: Skiing, skating, sledding = 3 GERUNDS (verb + -ing) Line 4: Mountains, wind, breeze, ocean = 2 NOUNS+ 2 NOUNS Line 5: Swimming, surfing, scuba diving = 3 GERUNDS (verb + -ing) Line 6: Sunny, hot = 2 ADJECTIVES Line 7: Summer = 1 NOUN Unit 3:  Unit 3 Précis Writing The suitable opening sentence is(3): “It was Sunday and Kate and I convinced my uncle that there could be three Sundays in a week”. Unit 3:  Unit 3 Paragraph Writing The first sentence,actually sums up the theme:“The creation of the world by Jehovah”.The following details carry on the legend chronologically up to the end of the Creation. Letter Writing The Purpose of a letter Unit 4:  Unit 4 General Reading Skills How to begin 1. Read with a pencil in hand, and annotate (note and comment) the text. 2. Be guided by signal Unit 4 Unit 4:  Unit 4 Unit 4 Recall and review Recall Review Unit 4:  Unit 4 1. forces you to check your understanding. 2. shapes the material into a logical form. 3. highlights what you do not understand. 4. forces you to think. Unit 4:  Unit 4 TEXT I A Man from Stratford--William Shakespeare 1. Pre-reading Questions 2. The Main Idea 3. Backgrounds 4. Language Points 5. Vocabulary 6. Questions Answers Unit 4:  Unit 4 About Stratford Stratford-upon-avon is situated in the heart of the English midlands. A market town dating back to medieval times, Stratford is today most famous as the birthplace of the Elizabethan playwright William Shakespeare. Unit 4:  Unit 4 About Stratford Stratford-upon-avon is situated in the heart of the English midlands. A market town dating back to medieval times, Stratford is today most famous as the birthplace of the Elizabethan playwright William Shakespeare. Slide96:  The River Avon Alms Houses Unit 4 Unit 4:  Unit 4 William Shakespeare Born (1564) and died (1616) on the same date - 23rd April England's greatest poet and playwright was born at Stratford-upon-Avon, the son of a tradesman of Stratford, John Shakespeare in 1564. William, the eldest son, and third child (of eight) was educated at Stratford Grammar School. He did not go to University. Shakespeare's Birthplace Unit 4:  Unit 4 The Royal Shakespeare Theatre : Perhaps the most famous resident of Stratford today is the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC). The RSC, founded in 1960 by Peter Hall, boasts the finest actors and directors working on great plays in some of the best theatre spaces in the world. Unit 4:  Unit 4 In 1616 Shakespeare was buried in the Church of the Holy Trinity the same Church where he was baptized in 1564. Tradition has it that he died after an evening's drinking with some of his theatre friends. Holy Trinity Church Unit 4:  Unit 4 Language Points 1. ...of his "second best bed and furniture"... Before an adjective of the superlative degree, we can often use second or third or by far to modify it, e. g. , Hainan Island is the second largest island in China. The Amazon is by far the longest river in the world. Unit 4:  Unit 4 2. It was the will of a comfortably off man... It is more common to say: well off, badly off It is also possible to use the comparative form of the adjective, e. g., be better off - be in better circumstances be worse off - be in worse circumstances. But well-to-do, which is equal to "rich and wealthy", means the possession of more than enough money or property. Unit 4:  Unit 4 3. ... the income from the estate probably amounted to about... 1) amount to - add up to, reach, e. g. , Our monthly expenditure on food usually amounts to 150 yuan. 2) amount to - be equal in meaning, be the same as, e.g. , Failure to prepare a lesson well before class on the part of the teacher amounts to negligence of duty; whereas failure to attend the class on time on the part of the student amounts to a breach (disobey) of discipline. Unit 4:  Unit 4 4. ... Almost every detail of his personal life is supposition rather than fact rather than here has the meaning of "instead of", e. g. , Young people should be an asset to society rather than a menace (danger) or a curse. It was such a low doorway that I had to bend my head to go into the room rather than walk into the room upright. Unit 4:  Unit 4 I . legacy 2. estate 3. genius 4. awe 5. thriving 6. (to) plot 7. become involved 8. clue 9. apparently 10. conviction 11. sufficiently 12. influential 1.money or property left to someone by a will 2.privately owned piece of land with a large house on it 3.talented man 4.a mixed feeling of respect,fear and wonder 5.prosperous,successful 6.work out an outline for 7. become engaged 8. something that helps to find an answer to a question 9. clearly, obviously 10. very firm belief 11. enough 12. powerful and wealthy Unit 4:  Unit 4 Questions 1. Why was Shakespeare's will the will of a comfortably off man? 2. How would you define a literary genius? (A comfortably off man is a man who is well-off or wealthy. ) When Shakespeare died, he left in his will quite a large sum of money to his daughter and handsome furniture to his wife, which showed that he was quite well to-do. So we can say that his will was the will of a comfortably off man. 2. He is one who has an exceptionally great creative and inventive capacity in writing. Unit 4:  Unit 4 3. Why did the writer say "Historically speaking, Shakespeare lived only yesterday"? 3. From the historical point of view, four hundred years is only a short period of time. Besides, historians set the date 1453 as the beginning of modern history. Shakespeare was born in 1564 and died in 1616. So to the historians, Shakespeare lived only yesterday. Unit 4:  Unit 4 4. What is meant by the sentence: "To plot Shakespeare's life is to become involved in a kind of detective story where there are plenty of clues but very little else"? 4. Anyone who wants to make an outline of Shakespeare's life finds himself in a difficult situation. He is like a detective trying to find out about a case. He has only a lot of clues but hardly any facts or evidence. Unit 4:  Unit 4 5. What is meant by "... (he) realized in a flash that this was the life for him and talked one of the managers into giving him a job"? 5. It means "After Shakespeare had seen some of the performances put on by some of the theatrical companies, he came to see instantly that he ought to take up theatre as his career, and he persuaded one of the managers to give him a job. Unit 4:  Unit 4 6. What is the implied meaning of the sentence "We know that as well as working on old plays he rapidly made a name for himself as an author of entirely new ones and also performed as an actor at court"? 6. The sentence means: "He soon became famous by not only improving or revising the old plays but also writing completely new plays and acting in the plays for the queen. " The implied meaning of this sentence is that Shakespeare was gifted both in creative writing and in acting in the theatre. Unit 4:  Unit 4 TEXT II William Shakespeare Questions 1. What was known about Shakespeare's early schooling? 2. What are the two legends about Shakespeare's life between the time he left school and his departure for London? Unit 4:  Unit 4 Role-play Theatre and Cinema The Twelfth Night It is an amusing triangle love story with a merry end. Unit 4:  Unit 4 Interaction activities The Best Play/ Film I’ve Seen Plot:Intricate yet convincing,showing the struggle between the good and the evil,indicating that good will finally defeat evil Acting:Superb.No exaggeration on the part of the actors and actresses Music:Fantastic,especially the music depicting the changing scenery on the river in spring,characterized by its gentle and free flowing quality Costumes:Brilliant,true to the social and historical background Unit 4:  Unit 4 Game19.exe Unit 4:  Unit 4 GUIDED WRITING Précis Writing Paragraph Writing Letter Writing Unit 4:  Unit 4 If you had a million dollars If you had a million dollars, what would you do? What would you do? If you had a million dollars, what would you do? What would you do? I'd buy the biggest boat I'd drive the fastest car I'd watch the biggest TV I'd see the greatest movies Unit 4:  Unit 4 I'd eat nicest food I'd listen to the coolest songs I'd party at the hippest night clubs I'd dance with the hottest girls I'd buy, I'd drive, I'd watch, I'd eat, I'd listen and I'd party all day. I'd buy, I'd drive, I'd watch, I'd eat, I'd listen and I'd dance all night. Unit 4:  Unit 4 I'd learn to play guitar I'd drink the finest wine I'd wear the brightest diamonds. I'd speak fluent English I'd swim the longest river I'd climb the tallest mountain. I'd travel around the world I'd give it all away I'd learn, I'd drink, I'd speak, I'd swim, I'd climb, I'd give it all away I'd learn, I'd drink, I'd speak, I'd swim, I'd climb, I'd give it all away. Unit 4:  Unit 4 Dream Holiday Next week is my dream holiday. My dream holiday. Next week is my dream holiday. My dream holiday. No work for a week, No worries for a week, No problems for a week. Just paradise (x 2) Unit 4:  Unit 4 I'm leaving next Monday. I'll take the plane for Hawaii. Then on Tuesday, I'll spend all day at the beach. On Wednesday, I'll go shopping I'll spend all day at the duty free. On Thursday I'll go clubbing. Just dance, dance, dance, all night long Unit 4:  Unit 4 (Chorus) I'll relax, until Friday I'll hire a car and go for a drive On Saturday, I'll spend all day in the sea. On Sunday I don't know, Maybe I'll relax a little more. And every day, I'll have great food and fun, fun, fun, fun, fun Unit 5:  Unit 5 TEXT I The Light at the End of the Chunnel 1. Backgrounds 2. Pre-reading Questions 3. The Main Idea 4. Language Points 5. Vocabulary 6. Questions Answers Unit 5:  Unit 5 Unit 5:  Unit 5 The English Channel, also for some time known as the British Sea (French: La Manche, "the sleeve") is the part of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France, and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic Ocean. It is about 563 km (350 mi) long and at its widest is 240 km (150 mi). The Strait of Dover ("Pas de Calais" to the French) is the narrowest part of the channel, being only 34 km (21 mi) from Dover to Cap Gris-Nez, and is located at the eastern end of the English Channel, where it meets the North Sea. Unit 5:  Unit 5 Opening of the Channel Tunnel by Queen Elizabeth II and French President François Mitterrand Interior of Eurotunnel shuttle (vehicle train) Unit 5:  Unit 5 The Channel Tunnel, (French: le tunnel sous la Manche; popularly nicknamed the Chunnel in English) is a 50-km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover, connecting Cheriton in Kent, United Kingdom, and Coquelles near Calais in northern France. A long-standing and hugely expensive project that saw several false starts, it was finally completed in 1994. It is the second-longest rail tunnel in the world, surpassed only by the Seikan Tunnel in Japan. Unit 5:  Unit 5 The Channel Tunnel, also called the Euro Tunnel or Chunnel, actually consists of three tunnels. Two of the tubes are full sized and accommodate rail traffic. In between the two train tunnels is a smaller service tunnel that serves as an emergency escape route. There are also several "cross-over" passages that allow trains to switch from one track to another. Unit 5:  Unit 5 It took just three years for tunnel boring machines from France and England to chew through the chalky earth and meet hundreds of feet below the surface of the English Channel. Today, trains roar through the tunnel at speeds up to 100 miles per hour and it's possible to get from one end to the other in only 20 minutes! Unit 5:  Unit 5 Fast Facts: At the time it was being built, the Chunnel was the most expensive construction project ever conceived. It took $21 billion to complete the tunnel. That's 700 times more expensive than the cost to build the Golden Gate Bridge! Many of the tunnel boring machines used on the Chunnel were as long as two football fields and capable of boring 250 feet a day. Unit 5:  Unit 5 When construction began in 1988, British and French tunnel workers raced to reach the middle of the tunnel first. The British won. In the first five years of operation, trains carried 28 million passengers and 12 million tons of freight through the tunnel. Unit 5:  Unit 5 Locate data and determine the main idea or essential message Explain how the English Channel affects cultural, economic, and political activities of the United Kingdom and other European nations. Explain how people of the world are linked by transportation and technology. See the Chunnel as an example of human activity which affects the environment. Unit 5:  Unit 5 Language Points 1. compound adjectives : soon-to-be-opened the gull-wing eyebrows cross-Channel-link schemes the 31-mile-long Channel tungsten-tipped teeth Unit 5:  Unit 5 2. stiff upper lip stiff upper lip noun [C usually singular] Someone who has a stiff upper lip does not show their feelings when they are upset: He was taught at school to keep a stiff upper lip, whatever happens. Unit 5:  Unit 5 3. Foreboding foreboding    noun [C or U] LITERARY a feeling that something very bad is going to happen soon: There's a sense of foreboding in the capital, as if fighting might at any minute break out. Her forebodings about the future were to prove justified. [+ (that)] He had a strange foreboding (that) something would go wrong. Unit 5:  Unit 5 4. Shudder to shake suddenly with very small movements because of a very unpleasant thought or feeling: The sight of so much blood made him shudder. She shuddered at the thought of kissing him. Unit 5:  Unit 5 5. Shoot up shoot up (INCREASE) phrasal verb INFORMAL to grow in size, or increase in number or level, very quickly: David has really shot up since I saw him last. Prices shot up by 25%. Unit 5:  Unit 5 6. Tunnel boring machines (TBM) are used to excavate tunnels with a circular cross section through a variety of geologies. They can be used to bore through hard rock or sand or almost anything in between. Unit 5:  Unit 5 Tunnel boring machine Unit 5:  Unit 5 7. color verb [often passive] If something colors your opinion of something, it influences your opinion in a negative way: I'm sure my views on marriage are colored by my parents' divorce. I'm trying not to let my judgment be colored by that one incident. Unit 5:  Unit 5 Vocabulary 1. shudder 2. ketchup 3. feat 4. hitched 5. scheme 6. parallel 7. psyche 8. moat 9. installation 10. communication lines 11. quirk 12. chic 1. uncontrollable shaking 2. / 'ketʃэp / sauce made from tomato juice 3. an impressive and difficult achievement 4. fastened to a hook 5. / ski:m / plan or design for work 6. going at the same distance from one another 7. /'saiki / human mind; mentality 8. deep, wide water ditch round a castle as a defense 9. fixing (apparatus) in position for use 10. telephone or telegraph lines connecting places 11. peculiar behavior 12. / ʃi:k, ʃik / stylish, fashionable in style Unit 5:  Unit 5 Answer the questions orally. 1. What did an English couple say about the French people, and what did a Frenchman say about the English people? Why do you think they showed a mutual feeling of dislike? 1. An English retired civil servant said that he'd rather have England become the 51st state of the U. S. A. than have his country linked to France. He added that the French didn't care for anybody. His wife said that France was an awful place and that the French people drank wine all the time. She disliked French food and preferred to have English sauce with her food. In the meantime, a French farmer complained about English ketchup and about their not having any good wine. The British and the French people disliked each other because there had been long years of conflict between the two countries. Unit 5:  Unit 5 2. With the help of the information given in the Notes, explain the following: 1) 200 years of failed cross-Channel-link schemes, and 2) 1,000 years of historical rift. 2. 1) The Channel Tunnel Project had been discussed between Britain and France on governmental levels for almost two hundred years. It was in 1802 that the first proposal for a Channel Tunnel was put forward by a French engineer. Since then the question was taken up again and again throughout the nineteenth century and for the most part of the twentieth century. It did not come to fruition until the last decade of the twentieth century. 2) Beginning with the Norman Conquest in 1066 until the early nineteenth century, there had been incessant conflicts between Great Britain and France. All in all there was a rift between the two countries for about one thousand years. (See the details in the notes.) Unit 5:  Unit 5 3. How Swill the Chunnel facilitate the transport between Great Britain and France, or rather, between Great Britain and other European countries? 3. It will greatly facilitate the transport between Great Britain and France. For example, for a motorist to cross the English Channel, he can use the Chunnel Shuttle Service and cross the Channel in only 35 minutes, as against 90 minutes by ferry before. The through service provided by Eurostar passenger trains takes only 3 hours to travel from London to Paris, and 3 hours 10 minutes from London to Brussels, Belgium. Unit 5:  Unit 5 4. How do you understand the sentence "The Chunnel rewrites geography, at least in the English psyche"? 4. The English Channel had served as a barrier to invasion of Britain for centuries, and invasion by tunnel was at one time "the ultimate British nightmare" As a matter of fact, whenever the idea of a link between the two countries emerged, there also appeared visions of invasion, and proposals for a link simply foundered. But the completion of the Chunnel has now joined Britain to the European continent. In other words, Britain is no longer an island. Thus the geographical condition is completely changed, especially to the British people. Unit 5:  Unit 5 5. How did the author of the article get the opportunity of witnessing the breakthrough ceremony for the south running tunnel? 5. The author, Cathy Newman, is a senior staff member of the National Geographic magazine. Being a journalist, she was presumably invited to attend and to cover the breakthrough ceremony, as there were also several dozen other journalists going with her. Unit 5:  Unit 5 6. Why did one of the visitors say "Makes you appreciate British Rail"? 6. It is because the construction workers' train which took them down the tunnel screeched in a dreadful way, whereas the British Rail passenger trains would not make such a noise. Unit 5:  Unit 5 7. What did the author refer to when she spoke of "those vine la difference quirks"? 7. She referred to two distinctive differences between the British and the French ways of doing things. One is that the French gave women's names to the tunnel boring machines (TBM), for example, "Catherine", whereas the British only gave the machines numbers, e. g. , TBM No 6. The other difference is that the French workers wore colorful work clothes while their British counterparts wore something grungy. Unit 5:  Unit 5 8. How deep is the Chunnel under the ocean at the breakthrough site? 8. It is about 180 feet or 54.9 meters deep. Unit 5:  Unit 5 9. Describe the breakthrough scene in your own words. 9. There were many people present, the Eurotunnel officials, construction workers, and journalists. There was loud music as well as dazzling lights, when the cutterhead of the tunnel boring machine bit into the last piece of rock separating England from France. A number of Frenchmen were seen coming from the other side, and thunderous applause was heard. The French and British people drank champagne and hugged each other. It was truly a moving sight. Unit 5:  Unit 5 10. Did the mutual feeling of dislike still exist when the tunnel was completed? 10. No. Both the French and British celebrated the breakthrough, and an Englishman said, "I might have opposed it 30 years ago, but now it's my tunnel." Unit 5:  Unit 5 TEXT II Traveling Questions 1. What kept Aunt Augusta from traveling as constantly as before? 2. What were the advantages of going to Istanbul by plane? 3. Why did Aunt Augusta not take the plane? 4. What do you think their surname was? 5. Compare Aunt Augusta and Henry. Unit 5:  Unit 5 nightfall noun [U] the time in the evening when it becomes dark Unit 5:  Unit 5 Victoria Station Unit 5:  Unit 5 Weymouth is a town in Dorset, England, situated on a sheltered bay – Weymouth Bay – at the mouth of the River Wey on the English Channel coast. Unit 5:  Unit 5 Weymouth is acknowledged as being amongst the first ever tourist destinations, after King George III made Weymouth his summer holiday residence on fourteen occasions between1789 and 1805, sparking a trend of sea bathing and health tourism. The Promenade Unit 5:  Unit 5 George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. Slide156:  The junction of St. Mary Street and St. Thomas Street with the statue in the centre Unit 5 Slide157:  Gloucester Lodge, Weymouth Seafront Unit 5 Unit 5:  Unit 5 Istanbul stands between Europe and Asia and is a once in a life-time ‘must visit’. Istanbul, was formerly known as Constantinople(君士坦丁堡), and before that Byzantium(拜占庭). The design of Mosques(清真寺) actually comes from this building which was originally a church built in 535AD. You should not miss this city. Slide159:  Blue Mosque Unit 5 Unit 5:  Unit 5 Contraption noun [C] a device or machine that looks awkward or old-fashioned, especially one that you do not know how to use: Whatever's that strange contraption you've got in the garage? Unit 5:  Unit 5 Badger verb [T] to persuade someone by telling them repeatedly to do something, or to question someone repeatedly: Stop badgering me - I'll do it when I'm ready. [+ into + ing form of verb] She's been badgering me into doing some exercise. [+ to infinitive] Every time we go into a shop, the kids badger me to buy them sweets. Unit 5:  Unit 5 Interaction Activities The New Construction Project in Our City / Town Suggestions: Pros(正方) 1. A new construction project, such as the Metro subway, will improve urban infrastructure and consequently better the life of the city residents. 2. New construction projects will bring the city / town a new skyline and beautify the contour of the city / town. Unit 5:  Unit 5 3. People will enjoy the comfort of easy and fast transportation, and spacious and modern conditions of new apartment buildings. 4. With the improved urban infrastructure (下部机构), more international cultural events are likely to take place. Unit 5:  Unit 5 Cons 1. There will be less land for plantation and wild life. 2. Skyscrapers, especially those with glass walls, create visual pollution and send back the much hated heat into the sky during the summer season. 3. People have to leave their familiar neighborhood and move to other places in order to make room for the development projects. Unit 5:  Unit 5 4. The city / town is growing both in height and size at the cost of the traditional good neighborly relations enjoyed by the local residents. It is disheartening to see that people in a fast growing city tend to treat one another as strangers and behave in a way that is more business like. Unit 5:  Unit 5 GUIDED WRITING Précis Writing Paragraph Writing Letter Writing Unit 6:  Unit 6 TEXT I Atomic Cars 1. Backgrounds 2. Pre-reading Questions 3. The Main Idea 4. Find the key words in each paragraph 4. Language Points 5. Vocabulary 6. Questions Answers Unit 6:  Unit 6 Atomic Cars Unit 6:  Unit 6 Simplest model of an atom Unit 6:  Unit 6 Nuclear Reactors Most commercial nuclear reactors use ordinary water to remove the heat created by the fission process. These are called light water reactors. The water also serves to slow down, or "moderate" the neutrons. In this type of reactor, the chain reaction will not occur without the water to serve as a moderator. In the United States, two different light-water reactor designs are currently in use, the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Unit 6:  Unit 6 Diagram of a PWR Unit 6:  Unit 6 Diagram of a BWR Unit 6:  Unit 6 1. T (The technical term for the splitting of the atom is called "atomic fission".) 2. T (The rays are radioactive and may also be called "radiation".) 3. T 4. F (Atomic energy has been used in power stations, in ships and rockets, but not in cars.) 5. F (It would be both convenient to use and cheap to keep, because a small piece of uranium can keep the car running for many, many years.) Unit 6:  Unit 6 Language Points outlay   noun [C] an amount of money spent for a particular purpose, especially as a first investment in something: For an initial outlay of £2000 to buy the equipment, you should be earning up to £500 a month if the product sells well. outlay    verb [T] outlaid, outlaid MAINLY US At the start we outlaid thousands of dollars on computers. Unit 6:  Unit 6 optimism noun [U] the tendency to be hopeful and to emphasize the good part of a situation rather than the bad part; the belief that good things will happen in the future: There was a note of optimism in his voice as he spoke about the company's future. Judging from your examination results, I think you have cause/grounds/reason for cautious optimism about getting a university place. Unit 6:  Unit 6 optimist noun [C] someone who always believes that good things will happen: She's a born optimist (= someone who has always been optimistic). Unit 6:  Unit 6 optimistic adjective She is optimistic about her chances of winning a gold medal. NOTE: The opposite is pessimistic. Unit 6:  Unit 6 bonnet (METAL COVER) UK     noun [C] (US hood) the metal cover over the part of a car where the engine is: I looked under the bonnet and clouds of smoke poured out. Unit 6:  Unit 6 submarine    noun [C] (INFORMAL sub) a ship which can travel under water: a nuclear submarine a submarine base/commander Unit 6:  Unit 6 H.M. Submarine 'E.2' started her first patrol on 13 August 1915.  Unit 6:  Unit 6 1.refuel 2.optimistic 3.harness 4.penetrate 5.fatal 6.impractical 7.ease 8.basic 1. fill up again with fuel 2. taking the hopeful view of things and expecting the best outcome 3. use a natural force to produce useful power 4. force a way into 5. causing death, disastrous 6. that cannot be put into practice 7. being free from pain, worry or trouble; comfort 8. elementary, fundamental Unit 6:  Unit 6 Questions Answer the questions orally 1. Explain the following in your own words. 1) ... because there is no outlay on petrol. 1. 1) ... because there is no need to spend money on petrol. Unit 6:  Unit 6 2) ... depending upon how much you spend on petrol. 2) ... the amount of money you would save by using atomic power is determined by how much you spend on petrol. Unit 6:  Unit 6 3) ... with fatal results for anybody in its path. 3) If anyone happens to be in an area where there is radiation, it will cost him his life. Unit 6:  Unit 6 4) ... a metal that will be strong enough to hold in the rays, but at the same time light enough for a vehicle to carry with ease and economy. 4) ... the metal will be strong enough to prevent the rays from escaping but at the same time it will be so light in weight that any vehicle can carry it without too much difficulty and without costing too much money. Unit 6:  Unit 6 5) But it seems safe to say that eventually, as techniques and mass production come in atom engine, the price will go down. 5) We have every reason to say that when new techniques and methods are introduced and when atomic engines can be produced on a large scale, the price, as a result, will be lowered. Unit 6:  Unit 6 6) ... in every circumstance. 6) under all conditions Unit 6:  Unit 6 2. What kind of structure is the sentence "Harness atomic power in a car, and you'll have no more worries about petrol" ? Can you give an example using this structure? 2. The sentence may be reworded as "If you can harness atomic power in a car, you'll have no more worries about petrol". The structure Imperative sentence + and you'll is equivalent to a conditional sentence structure formed by If..., you'll... Unit 6:  Unit 6 3. What is the function of the word say in the sentence "But say the experts, there are many problems still to be conquered before such an engine can in fact be fixed into a car“. 3. Say is the predicate verb of the subject experts. The clause say the experts is in inverted order. The statement following the clause is a kind of direct speech. This loose journalistic style makes the article colloquial and informal. Unit 6:  Unit 6 TEXT II Energy or Extinction ? Questions 1. Why is Sir Fred Hoyle's book Energy and Extinction riveting? In what respects is it different from other books on the same subject? 2. What did Sir Fred Hoyle say was the only hope for the future? Do you agree with him? 3. For what purpose did Sir Fred Hoyle write the book Energy or Extinction? Unit 6:  Unit 6 4. What do you think is the reason for so much opposition to the development of nuclear reactors? 5. After you have read the whole passage, do you have a better understanding of the title Energy or Extinction? Explain it in your own words. Unit 6:  Unit 6 Sir Fred Hoyle (June 24, 1915 in Yorkshire – August 20in Bournemouth, England, 2001) was a British astronomer, notable for a number of his theories that run counter to current astronomical opinion, and a writer of science fiction, including a number of books co-authored by his son Geoffrey Hoyle. Unit 6:  Unit 6 Language points: 1. riveting rivet    noun [C] a metal pin used to fasten flat pieces of metal or other thick materials such as leather Unit 6:  Unit 6 rivet   verb [T] 1 to fasten together with a rivet: Many parts of an aircraft are riveted together. 2 be riveted to not be able to stop looking at something because it is so interesting or frightening: It was an amazing film - I was absolutely riveted. His eyes were riveted on the television. He pulled out a gun and I was riveted to the spot (= so frightened that I could not move). Unit 6:  Unit 6 riveting    adjective extremely interesting: It was a riveting story. Unit 6:  Unit 6 2. mean verb [T] meant, meant to have an important emotional effect on someone: It wasn't a valuable picture but it meant a lot to me. Possessions mean nothing to him. Unit 6:  Unit 6 mean (INTEND)    verb [I or T] meant, meant to intend: I'm sorry if I offended you - I didn't mean any harm. The books with large print are meant for our partially sighted readers. [+ to infinitive] I've been meaning to phone you all week. Do you think she meant to say 9 a.m. instead of 9 p.m.? [+ object + to infinitive] This exercise isn't meant to be difficult. They didn't mean for her to read the letter. Unit 6:  Unit 6 2. sloppy sloppy (TOO WET)    adjective INFORMAL DISAPPROVING (of a substance) more liquid than it should be, often in a way that is unpleasant: The batter was a bit sloppy so I added some more flour. Unit 6:  Unit 6 adjective 1 DISAPPROVING lacking care or effort: Spelling mistakes always look sloppy in a formal letter. Another sloppy pass like that might lose them the whole match. 2 describes clothes which are large, loose and often untidy: At home I tend to wear big sloppy jumpers and jeans. Unit 6:  Unit 6 Cumbria was formed from the old counties of Cumberland, Westmorland, and part of North Lancashire, and is now England's second largest county in size. Inside is the Lake District National Park, an area some 30 miles across, containing England's highest mountains (four over 3000 ft), and some of England's biggest lakes. Unit 6:  Unit 6 Cumbria Unit 6:  Unit 6 Nuclear power complex at Windscale In 1957, the graphite moderator (石墨减速剂)of one of the air-cooled plutonium (镮)production reactors at Windscale (now Sellafield), had a fire which resulted in the first significant release of radioactive material from a reactor. Unit 6:  Unit 6 Windscale /Sellafield Unit 6:  Unit 6 Windscale is situated on the Sellafield site, Cumbria, although it has its own site licence. The site includes Windscale Piles I and II, and the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor. The Windscale site occupies 35 acres. Unit 6:  Unit 6 Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Unit 6:  Unit 6 The Windscale AGR was shut down in 1981 . Future use of the land at Windscale is still to be decided. However, Sellafield/Windscale is an industrial complex, so it is possible that new commercial Development will take place at the site.    Unit 6:  Unit 6 3. scrap (THROW AWAY)    verb [T] -pp- 1 to not continue with a system or plan: They're considering scrapping the tax and raising the money in other ways. We scrapped our plans for a trip to France. 2 to get rid of something which is no longer useful or wanted, often using its parts in new ways: Hundreds of nuclear weapons have been scrapped. Unit 6:  Unit 6 scrap (ARGUMENT)    noun [C] a fight or argument, especially a quick noisy one about something unimportant: A couple of kids were having a scrap in the street. Unit 6:  Unit 6 4. arsenal    noun [C] 1 a building where weapons and military equipment are stored: The army planned to attack enemy arsenals. 2 a collection of weapons: The country has agreed to reduce its nuclear arsenal. Unit 6:  Unit 6 5. evacuate verb [I or T] to move people from a dangerous place to somewhere safe: The police evacuated the village shortly before the explosion. A thousand people were evacuated from their homes following the floods. When toxic fumes began to drift toward our homes, we were told to evacuate. Unit 6:  Unit 6 evacuation    noun [C or U] The evacuation of civilians remains out of the question while the fighting continues. The first evacuations came ten days after the disaster. Unit 6:  Unit 6 Cornwall is a county of England's south-west peninsula, lying west of the River Tamar. Unit 6:  Unit 6 Keswick is the North Lakes' most popular holiday and day trip destination. Nestling between the Skiddaw Mountains and Derwentwater Lake, Keswick is in an idyllic (wonderful) location in the Lake District National Park. Unit 6:  Unit 6 Derwentwater in early Autumn Keswick’s moot hall Unit 6:  Unit 6 Oral Work Role-play A Discussion on the Nuclear Power Station Interaction Activities A Discussion on the Nuclear Energy Unit 6:  Unit 6 GUIDED WRITING Précis Writing Paragraph Writing Letter Writing Unit 6:  Unit 6 Gettysburg Address.doc 林肯演说 Unit 7:  Unit 7 TEXT I On Not Answering the Telephone 1. Backgrounds 2. Pre-reading Questions 3. The Main Idea 4. Language Points 5. Vocabulary 6. Questions Answers Unit 7:  Unit 7 William Plomer (1903-1973), Writer South African born writer gained international acclaim with his first novel Turbolt Wolfe (1926), which dealt with inter-racial love and marriage. He settled in England in 1929. Through his friendship with his publishers, Leonard and Virginia Woolf he rapidly moved to the heart of the English literary establishment. After the publication of The Invaders (1934) He produced little fiction but continued to publish short stories, essays, collections of poetry. Unit 7:  Unit 7 Language Points 1. take sth for granted to believe something to be the truth without even thinking about it: I didn't realize that Melanie hadn't been to college - I suppose I just took it for granted. Unit 7:  Unit 7 pose (CAUSE)   verb [T] to cause something, especially a problem or difficulty: Nuclear weapons pose a threat to everyone. Unit 7:  Unit 7 pose (ASK)   verb [T] to ask a question, especially in a formal situation such as a meeting: Can we go back to the question that Helena posed earlier? poser    noun [C] INFORMAL a problem or question that is difficult to solve or answer: Who was the last woman to win three Olympic gold medals? That's quite a poser. Unit 7:  Unit 7 pose (POSITION)    verb [I] to move into and stay in a particular position, in order to be photographed, painted, etc: We all posed for our photographs next to the Statue of Liberty. pose    noun [C] a particular position in which a person stands, sits, etc. in order to be photographed, painted, etc: He adopted/assumed/struck (= moved into) an elegant pose. Unit 7:  Unit 7 pose (PRETEND)    verb [I] to pretend to be something that you are not or to have qualities that you do not possess, in order to be admired or attract interest: He doesn't really know a thing about the theatre - he's just posing! pose    noun [C usually singular] when someone pretends to have qualities that they do not possess: She likes to appear as if she knows all about the latest films and art exhibitions, but it's all a pose (= she's pretending and it's not true). Unit 7:  Unit 7 pose as sb phrasal verb If you pose as a particular person, you pretend to be that person in order to deceive people: He's posing as her date, but he's really her bodyguard. Unit 7:  Unit 7 pest   noun [C] 1 an insect or small animal which is harmful or which damages crops: common pests such as rats, mice or cockroaches (蟑螂) 2 INFORMAL an annoying person, especially a child: Put that back, you little pest! Unit 7:  Unit 7 asphyxiate [sfiksieit ]vi.窒息 vt.使窒息 verb [T often passive] FORMAL to cause someone to be unable to breathe, usually resulting in death: The murder inquiry found that the children had been asphyxiated. asphyxiation noun [U] Unit 7:  Unit 7 fidget verb [I] to make continuous small movements which annoy other people: Children can't sit still for long without fidgeting. Stop fidgeting about! fidget noun [C] a person wh

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