2013 Annual Report

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Information about 2013 Annual Report
Government & Nonprofit

Published on April 16, 2014

Author: midsouthpeace

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Your ongoing support and solidarity have helped our community speak nonviolent truth to power. Thank you for your support of the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center.

Please view our 2013 Annual Report which details the amazing work and significant victories you have worked with our community to achieve in the past year.

Trained 524 in grassroots organizing + Pre- vented $250,000 in homeless service cuts + Secured a $10,000 grant to launch Street- wise INK + Participated in Greenprint + Partnered in 8 community police relations forums for 335 residents + Stopped “Play to Stay” abuse in a local shelter + Cele- brated 10 years of the Gandhi- King Confer- ence + Expand- ed to provide Community Or- ganizer Training in Spanish + Prevent- ed $1.2 million in cuts to MATA funding + Coordinated People’s Day on the Hill + Collaborated to host city-wide People’s Conference on Race and Equality + Supported publi- cation of Memphis’ first street newspa-­ per + H.O.P.E. Women’s Caucus Mem-­ bers trained in Self Defense 2013  Board Emily  Fulmer  —  Chair GrowMemphis Dana  Wilson  —  Secretary BRIDGES Federico  Gomez—  Treasurer La no  Cultural  Center  of  Memphis Nabil  Bayakly Muslims  in  Memphis Janis  Benson A orney Marquita  Bradshaw Defense  Depot  of  Memphis,  TN  Concerned  Ci zens   Commi ee Cris na  Condori Comunidades  Unidas  con  Una  Voz Paul  Crum Pax  Chris  Memphis Carolyn  Head Southwest  Tennessee  Community  College Onie  G.  Johns Caritas  Village Kyle  Kordsmeier Workers  Interfaith  Network Cody  Mathis Student  Organizer Tiffany  Futch Women’s  Ac on  Coali on Staff Allison  Glass—Training  Director Brad  Watkins—Organizing  Director Brooke  Sarden—Opera ons  Director Giovanna  Lopez—Training  Coordinator Jacob  Flowers—Execu ve  Director Melissa  Miller-Monie—Organizing  Coordinator Paul  Garner—Organizing  Coordinator The  inherent  power  of  the  individual:  We  know  the  people  we   work  with  hold  the  power  to  ini ate  and  advance  posi ve   change  in  their  communi es,  and  it’s  these  people  who  must  be   the  leaders  in  campaigns  to  improve  their  lives. Communi es  of  libera on:  We  work  to  create  a  world  without   oppression.  We  recognize  that  the  roots  of  oppression  run  deep   systemically  and  within  ourselves.  We  implement  strategies  of   an -oppression  within  every  facet  of  our  organizing  and  within   our  organiza on  itself. Achieving  nonviolent  solu ons  using  nonviolent  strategy:  The   MSPJC  was  founded  on  the  nonviolent  principles  of  Mohandas   Gandhi  and  Mar n  Luther  King,  Jr.  We  know  that  the  most  pow-­‐ erful  change  can  only  be  brought  about  using  nonviolent   means,  and  we  are  dedicated  to  prac cing  and  teaching  nonvio-­‐ lent  ac on. Our  Values Grassroots  Organizing  Con nued Greenprint:  MSPJC  is  the  staff  organiza on  for  the  Social  Equity  Working  Group   of  the  Mid-South  Regional  Greenprint  Consor um.    The  chair  of  the  Social  Equity   Working  Group  is  Mia  Madison  of  City  of  Memphis  Division  of  Housing  and  Commu-­‐ nity  Development.  Coordinated  monthly  mee ngs  and  ac vi es  of  the  group,  which  is  responsible   for  ensuring  that  Greenprint  outreach  and  engagement  ac vi es  reach  minori-­‐ es,  disabled  persons,  elderly  persons,  persons  with  Limited  English  Proficien-­‐ cy,  and  other  under-represented  popula ons.    Provides  perspec ve  on  environmental  jus ce  and  “Not  in  My  Back-­‐ yard”  (NIMBY)  issues.    Strategizes  to  increase  par cipa on  in  the  regional  planning  process,  par cu-­‐ larly  with  respect  to  engagement  of  low-income  communi es,  minority  popula-­‐ ons,  and  other  communi es  typically  underrepresented  in  regional  planning.   Memphis  United:  MSPJC  is  a  501(c)(3)  sponsor  and  a  founding  member   Worked  in  coali on  with  over  20  local  community  and  grassroots  organiza ons  to   host  the  “People’s  Conference  on  Race  and  Equality:  a  part  of  the  Heart  of  Mem-­‐ phis”,  in  response  to  a  KKK  rally  downtown  that  same  day.    A racted  more  than   1,500  par cipants  in  panel  discussions,  workshops  and  other  awareness-building   ac vi es.  Designed  workshops  and  provided  material  and  staff  support.      Co-hosted  a  forum  on  Interna onal  Workers  Day  about  local  issues  related  to   worker  jus ce. The  Bridge:  MSPJC  is  the  501(c)(3)  sponsor  for  The  Bridge,  Memphis’  first  street   newspaper,  produced  and  sold  by  vendors  experiencing  homelessness.  Provided  technical  support  and  assistance  in  outreach  to  people  experiencing   homelessness.   Statewide  Organizing:  Coordinated  the  March  12th  “People’s  Day  on  the  Hill”.  This  effort  joined  grass-­‐ roots  and  progressive  organiza ons  that  had  previously  held  separate  lobby   days,  to  come  together  for  support  and  solidarity.  Par cipants  included  Cha a-­‐ nooga  Organized  for  Ac on,  Statewide  Organizing  for  Community  Empower-­‐ ment,  Tennessee  Immigrant  and  Refugee  Rights  Coali on,  Workers  Interfaith   Network,    Workers  Dignity  Project,  Healthy  &  Free  Tennessee,  Tennessee   Equality  Project,  Tennessee  Transgender  Poli cal  Ac on  Coali on,    AFSCME   Local  1733,    Tennessee  Ci zen  Ac on,  and  Memphis  Bus  Riders  Union.  Produced  a  comprehensive  guide  to  bills  of  interest  to  grassroots  communi es   that  was  distributed  to  lobby  day  par cipants  and  used  statewide  as  a  resource   for  our  community  members  at  home.  Coordinated  movement-building  space  in  a  nearby  church  that  included  lobby   training,  tes monial  and  learning  space,  and  a  central  place  for  all  groups  to   base  their  efforts  on  The  Hill. Organizing  and  mobilizing  people  to  realize   social  jus ce  through  nonviolent  ac on. Annual  Report   2013 Mid-South  Peace  and  Jus ce  Center 3573  Southern  Ave Memphis,  TN  38111 www.midsouthpeace.org 901.725.4990 Our  Mission

MSPJC’s  training  and  educa on  program,  Grass-­‐ roots  Organizer  Training  for  Power  (G.O.T.  Pow-­‐ er)  is  commi ed  to  building  our  community's   capacity  through:  building  skills  in  grassroots   organizing,  providing  support  to  people  doing   community  work,  and  offering  support  and  de-­‐ velopment  workshops  in  an -oppression  and   libera on  educa on.  G.O.T.  Power  u lizes  the   training  modality  of  direct  educa on,  in  which   par cipants  learn  skills  and  theory  through  hands -on  experience  and  by  learning  from  the  wisdom   of  the  group.  G.O.T.  Power  engages  the  commu-­‐ nity  by  offering  trainings  to  public,  as  well  as   serving  groups  with  specific  training  requests.  It  is  an  open  resource  to   the  community,  offering  all  trainings  and  workshops  on  a  deeply  dis-­‐ counted  sliding  scale,  with  no  one  turned  away. Community  Organizer  Training Our  flagship  organizing  skills  weekend-long  intensive  consis ng  of  six-­‐ teen  hours  of  direct-educa on  based  training  in  founda onal  skills  need-­‐ ed  to  be  effec ve  organizers.  Offered  in  English  and  Spanish  (G.O.T.   Poder).    Skill  base  includes:  Intro  to  Organizing,  Campaign  Planning,  Facil-­‐ ita on,  Media,  Transforming  Conflict,  Nonviolent  Direct  Ac on Organizer  Skills  Workshops 8  addi onal  short-form  organizing  skills  workshops  offered:  Intro  to  Nonviolent  Direct  Ac on  Founding  and  Funding  Your  Grassroots  Group  Media  201    Facilita on  Skills  Intro  to  Community  Organizing  for  Middle  School  Students  Facilita ng  Mee ngs  Lobbying  our  Representa ves  Training  for  Social  Ac on  Trainers  (Training  for  Change) An -Oppression  &  Development  Workshops  Empowerment  for  Women  Reflexology  Emo onal  Support  for  Men  Nonviolent  Communica on  Paren ng  from  the  Heart:  Nonviolent  Communica on  for  Parents  Emo onal  Support  for  Ac vists  Race  First  LGBTQ  Rights  for  Students There  were  524  total  G.O.T.  Power  training  and   workshop  par cipants  in  2013:  62  from  outside  of  Memphis  340  middle  and  high  school  students    54  engaged  in  training  of  trainers  opportuni es  27  trainings  requested  by  specific  groups Local  and  regional  community  groups  engaged  include:    Bridges  USA  Co-Mo on  Community-Police  Rela ons  Project  Comunidades  Unidas  en  Una  Voz  (Communi es  United  in  One   Voice),  Friends  For  Life,  Greater  Birmingham  Ministers  Grow  Memphis  Hispanic  Interest  Coali on  Alabama  (HICA),  Homeless  Organizing  for  Power  and  Equality  (H.O.P.E.)  Memphis  Bus  Riders  Union  (MBRU)  NAACP  Peace  and  Jus ce  Center  of  Nashville  Sierra  Club  Tennessee  Immigrant  &  Refugees  Rights  Coali on  (TIRRC  Workers  Interfaith  Network Homeless  Organizing  for  Power  &   Equality  (H.O.P.E.)  is  a  grassroots  organiza-­‐ on  made  up  of  exclusively  of  people  who  have   formerly  or  are  currently  experiencing  homeless-­‐ ness,  advoca ng  on  behalf  of  themselves  and  the   homeless  community.    Prevented  $250,000  in  cuts  to  funding  for  vital   housing  programs  and  suppor ve  services   secured  by  H.O.P.E.  for  the  2012  Shelby  Coun-­‐ ty  budget.  Recruited  over  30  H.O.P.E.  members  and  al-­‐ lies,  and  coordinated  street-outreach  for  the   Community  Alliance  for  the  Homeless’  “100   Homes  Campaign”,  for  which  H.O.P.E.  had   secured  crucial  funding.  100  Homes  aims  to   priori ze  individuals  for  housing  based  on   their  vulnerability  to  street  homelessness.  Recruited  over  60  volunteers  and  hosted  vol-­‐ unteer  training  for  the  city  of  Memphis'  “Point   in  Time”  annual  count  of  the  homeless.  Recruited  over  100  volunteers  and  assisted   with  “Project  Homeless  Connect”,  a  massive  bi -annual  outreach  and  service  event  to  break   down  barriers  that  make  it  difficult  to  leave   homelessness.  Updated,  published  and  distributed  6,500   copies  of  the  “Homeless  Survival  Guide”,   Memphis'  first  user-friendly  directory  of  all   homeless  services.  Served  as  a  member  organiza on  with  the   Memphis/Shelby  County  Homelessness  Con-­‐ sor um,  and  the  Memphis  United  Coali on In  2013    H.O.P.E.  has  developed  four  dis nct  pro-­‐ jects  to  address  diverse  aspects  of  homelessness   and  poverty.  Developed  a  coopera ve  business  model  for   “Street-Wise  INK”,  a  member-owned,  t-shirt   prin ng  business.      Secured  a  $10,000  Spark  Plug  Founda on   grant  to  support  the  cost  of  equipment  and   training  Launched  “Street  Watch”  campaign  to  con-­‐ front  instances  of  police  harassment  of  people   experiencing  homelessness.      Hosted  seven  monthly  “Know  Your  Rights   Workshops”  to  educate  the  community  on   their  rights  and  how  to  assert  them.  (Average   50  par cipants  per  workshop)  Filed  official  complaints  with  Memphis  Police   Department  Internal  Affairs  in  response  to   unjust  arrests  and  cita ons  regarding  com-­‐ plaints  of  police  harassment  and/or  miscon-­‐ duct,  and  documented  the  process  for  filing  a   complaint.  Released  statement  condemning  harassment   and  the  viola on  of  civil  rights  by  law  enforce-­‐ ment  and  private  security  officers  following  a   string  of  incidents  where  individuals  using  cell   phones  to  document  poten al  unprofessional   behavior  were  arrested  and  their  phones  con-­‐ fiscated.  Working  with  the  Center  for  Research  on   Women,  launched  H.O.P.E.    “Women’s  Cau-­‐ cus”  to  address  and  confront  the  dis nct  ex-­‐ periences  of  people  experiencing  homeless-­‐ ness  who  iden fy  as  women,  including  domes-­‐ c  violence,  sexual  assault,  and  inadequate   shelter  and  housing  assistance  Waged  a  successful  direct  ac on  campaign   that  included  ten  weekly  public  protests   against  a  local  shelter/service  provider  for   employing  an  individual  about  whom  H.O.P.E.   received  numerous  complaints  of  sexual  har-­‐ assment  and  unprofessional  behavior  from   consumers  and  former  staff  persons.  Used  its  regular  “Dinner  and  Discussion”   mee ngs  as  a  pla orm  to  organize  specifically   around  issues  of  violence.  Talks  resulted  in  the   launching  of  a  fundraising  campaign  for  a  five- week  intensive  self-defense  training  which   equipped  members  with  the  fundamental   skills  needed  to  handle  an  a ack  and  get  out   of  violent  situa ons  quickly.  Ini ated  plans  for   a  training  of  trainers,  where  members  can   expand  training  of  women  experiencing  home-­‐ lessness  on  self-defense  on  the  street  and  in   shelters.  Formed  the  H.O.P.E.  “Garden  Crew”,  focused   on  developing  community  gardens  to  educate   members  on  food  independence,  establish   rela onships  within  the  community  and  beau-­‐ fy  our  neighborhoods. Community-Police  Rela ons  Project   (CPR)    creates  a  safe  place  for  community  and   law  enforcement  to  openly  discuss  barriers  that   prevent  building  a  posi ve  rela onship.    These   discussions  will  result  in  recommenda ons  and  a   plan  for  ac on  to  create  healthier  community- police  rela ons  in  Memphis  and  Shelby  County.  Eight  (8)  community  forums  were  conducted   in  2013,  reaching  an  es mated  735  communi-­‐ ty  members  from  Frayser,  Hickory  Hill,  Orange   Mound,  South  Memphis,  and  for  the  LGBTQ   and  La no  communi es,  as  well  as  400  stu-­‐ dents  at  the  2013  Gandhi-King  Conference.)    A   cri cal  first  step  in  a  long-term  reconcilia on- seeking  process,  community  forums  create  an   open,  mediated  space  for  civilians  and  law   enforcement  officers  to  share  personal  experi-­‐ ences  with  another.    Employ  of  improvisa on-­‐ al  theatre  company  Playback  Memphis  as   unique  communica on  tool  for  the  forums  has   allowed  even  the  most  difficult  offerings  to  be   shared  in  a  manner  where  the  story  can  be er   be  received  without  judgment.  Core  group  members  meet  monthly,  par ci-­‐ pate  in  working  groups  (steering  commi ee,   facilita on,  media,  and  outreach)  and  volun-­‐ teer  to  assist  with  community  forums.  As  a  result  of  CPR  par cipa on,  the  Sheriff's   Office  has  strengthened  its  connec on  with   Tennessee  Equality  Project  and  the  LGBTQ   community,  and  has  designated  Detec ve   Barbara  Tolbert  as  a  liaison  for  the  LGBTQ   MPD  officers  are  volunteering  as  liaisons.  Insights  regarding  about  the  community's   thoughts/percep ons  about  law  enforcement   gained  through  CPR  involvement,  are  being   reflected  in  official  law  enforcement  trainings. Memphis  Bus  Riders  Union  (MBRU)   works  to  build  a  sustainable  grassroots  organiza-­‐ on  made  up  of  and  represen ng  transit- dependent  people  in  the  local  area  to  organize  for   be er  public  transit.  Held  12  regular  member  mee ngs  with  the   MATA  bus  patrons  about  issues  of  public   transit.  Successfully  mobilized  hundreds  of  bus  riders   and  allies  to  a end  MATA  Town  Halls  and  City   Council  budget  hearings.  Completed  dra ing   and  approval  of  by-laws  and  the  elec on  of   new  officers.  Successfully  organized  to  restore  $1.2  million   in  funding  for  MATA  and  prevent  detrimental   cuts  and  changes  including  weekend,  late   night,  and  holiday  service,  Restored  bus  service  to  President’s  Island  and   Northhaven  and  prevented  the  cu ng  of  the   Central  (U  of  M)  and  Germantown  Parkway   routes  Offered  changes  to  the  #2  Airport  MATA  bus   route  in  the  Medical  District.  Par cipated  in  the  MATA  Shelter  Advisory   Commi ee,  providing  input  on  new/needed   shelter  loca ons. “I  found  the  camaraderie  fostered  amongst  the   group  invaluable.  Not  only  did  this  allow  me  to   meet,  network,  and  begin  rela onships  with  some   truly  badass  organizers,  but  it  too  emphasizes  the   importance  of  strong  rela onships  for  the  efficacy   of  any  ac on/campaign/movement.” -  Community  Organizer  Training  Par cipant Training  and  Engagement Organizing  and  Mobilizing 10th  Annual  Gandhi-King  Community  Conference More  than  200  par cipants  engaged  in  three  tracks  of  par cipatory  workshops,  panel  discussions  and   presenta ons.    An  addi onal  400  students  engaged  in  the  2013  Gandhi-King  Youth  Conference.  Plenary   Speakers:  Medea  Benjamin    of  CodePink  Women  for  Peace  &  Jaribu  Hill  of  Mississippi  Workers  Center Track  1:  Personal  Nonviolence:  Nonviolent  Communica on,  Vulnerability  and  Realness  in  Organizing,   Interfaith  Roundtable,  De-stressing  with  Yoga Track  2:  Nonviolence  in  Academia:  Comple ng  the  Circle  in  King's  Sociology,  Teaching  the  Holocaust  as  General  Educa on,  Pilgrimage  as  Poli cal   Spirituality,  Gandhi's  Programme  -  King's  Jus ce Track  3:  Movement-Building  Nonviolence:  Community  Police  Rela ons,  Public  Transit  Reform,  Nonviolence  and  Nonviolent  Interven on  Training,   Civil  Disobedience  in  the  TN  Immigrant  Rights  Movement,  War  on  Poverty  and  Homelessness ORGANIZE  for  Grassroots  Change:   Consistent,  coordinated  and  support-­‐ ed  organizing  that  li s  up  and  brings   together  the  grassroots  voices  of  our   communi es  to  work  toward  a  vision   of  libera on  and  social  jus ce   ENGAGE  Communi es  in  Building  Power:  Grass-­‐ roots  leadership  development  and  organizer  train-­‐ ing  to  rebuild  the  capacity  of  low  income  and  mar-­‐ ginalized  communi es  to  organize  for  peace,  jus ce   and  power MOBILIZE  Our  Power  for  Jus ce:   Mobilizing  our  community  to  create   posi ve  change  and  win  victories   that  are  based  upon  the  collec ve,   organized  power  of  those  most   affected  by  injus ce

MSPJC’s  training  and  educa on  program,  Grass-­‐ roots  Organizer  Training  for  Power  (G.O.T.  Pow-­‐ er)  is  commi ed  to  building  our  community's   capacity  through:  building  skills  in  grassroots   organizing,  providing  support  to  people  doing   community  work,  and  offering  support  and  de-­‐ velopment  workshops  in  an -oppression  and   libera on  educa on.  G.O.T.  Power  u lizes  the   training  modality  of  direct  educa on,  in  which   par cipants  learn  skills  and  theory  through  hands -on  experience  and  by  learning  from  the  wisdom   of  the  group.  G.O.T.  Power  engages  the  commu-­‐ nity  by  offering  trainings  to  public,  as  well  as   serving  groups  with  specific  training  requests.  It  is  an  open  resource  to   the  community,  offering  all  trainings  and  workshops  on  a  deeply  dis-­‐ counted  sliding  scale,  with  no  one  turned  away. Community  Organizer  Training Our  flagship  organizing  skills  weekend-long  intensive  consis ng  of  six-­‐ teen  hours  of  direct-educa on  based  training  in  founda onal  skills  need-­‐ ed  to  be  effec ve  organizers.  Offered  in  English  and  Spanish  (G.O.T.   Poder).    Skill  base  includes:  Intro  to  Organizing,  Campaign  Planning,  Facil-­‐ ita on,  Media,  Transforming  Conflict,  Nonviolent  Direct  Ac on Organizer  Skills  Workshops 8  addi onal  short-form  organizing  skills  workshops  offered:  Intro  to  Nonviolent  Direct  Ac on  Founding  and  Funding  Your  Grassroots  Group  Media  201    Facilita on  Skills  Intro  to  Community  Organizing  for  Middle  School  Students  Facilita ng  Mee ngs  Lobbying  our  Representa ves  Training  for  Social  Ac on  Trainers  (Training  for  Change) An -Oppression  &  Development  Workshops  Empowerment  for  Women  Reflexology  Emo onal  Support  for  Men  Nonviolent  Communica on  Paren ng  from  the  Heart:  Nonviolent  Communica on  for  Parents  Emo onal  Support  for  Ac vists  Race  First  LGBTQ  Rights  for  Students There  were  524  total  G.O.T.  Power  training  and   workshop  par cipants  in  2013:  62  from  outside  of  Memphis  340  middle  and  high  school  students    54  engaged  in  training  of  trainers  opportuni es  27  trainings  requested  by  specific  groups Local  and  regional  community  groups  engaged  include:    Bridges  USA  Co-Mo on  Community-Police  Rela ons  Project  Comunidades  Unidas  en  Una  Voz  (Communi es  United  in  One   Voice),  Friends  For  Life,  Greater  Birmingham  Ministers  Grow  Memphis  Hispanic  Interest  Coali on  Alabama  (HICA),  Homeless  Organizing  for  Power  and  Equality  (H.O.P.E.)  Memphis  Bus  Riders  Union  (MBRU)  NAACP  Peace  and  Jus ce  Center  of  Nashville  Sierra  Club  Tennessee  Immigrant  &  Refugees  Rights  Coali on  (TIRRC  Workers  Interfaith  Network Homeless  Organizing  for  Power  &   Equality  (H.O.P.E.)  is  a  grassroots  organiza-­‐ on  made  up  of  exclusively  of  people  who  have   formerly  or  are  currently  experiencing  homeless-­‐ ness,  advoca ng  on  behalf  of  themselves  and  the   homeless  community.    Prevented  $250,000  in  cuts  to  funding  for  vital   housing  programs  and  suppor ve  services   secured  by  H.O.P.E.  for  the  2012  Shelby  Coun-­‐ ty  budget.  Recruited  over  30  H.O.P.E.  members  and  al-­‐ lies,  and  coordinated  street-outreach  for  the   Community  Alliance  for  the  Homeless’  “100   Homes  Campaign”,  for  which  H.O.P.E.  had   secured  crucial  funding.  100  Homes  aims  to   priori ze  individuals  for  housing  based  on   their  vulnerability  to  street  homelessness.  Recruited  over  60  volunteers  and  hosted  vol-­‐ unteer  training  for  the  city  of  Memphis'  “Point   in  Time”  annual  count  of  the  homeless.  Recruited  over  100  volunteers  and  assisted   with  “Project  Homeless  Connect”,  a  massive  bi -annual  outreach  and  service  event  to  break   down  barriers  that  make  it  difficult  to  leave   homelessness.  Updated,  published  and  distributed  6,500   copies  of  the  “Homeless  Survival  Guide”,   Memphis'  first  user-friendly  directory  of  all   homeless  services.  Served  as  a  member  organiza on  with  the   Memphis/Shelby  County  Homelessness  Con-­‐ sor um,  and  the  Memphis  United  Coali on In  2013    H.O.P.E.  has  developed  four  dis nct  pro-­‐ jects  to  address  diverse  aspects  of  homelessness   and  poverty.  Developed  a  coopera ve  business  model  for   “Street-Wise  INK”,  a  member-owned,  t-shirt   prin ng  business.      Secured  a  $10,000  Spark  Plug  Founda on   grant  to  support  the  cost  of  equipment  and   training  Launched  “Street  Watch”  campaign  to  con-­‐ front  instances  of  police  harassment  of  people   experiencing  homelessness.      Hosted  seven  monthly  “Know  Your  Rights   Workshops”  to  educate  the  community  on   their  rights  and  how  to  assert  them.  (Average   50  par cipants  per  workshop)  Filed  official  complaints  with  Memphis  Police   Department  Internal  Affairs  in  response  to   unjust  arrests  and  cita ons  regarding  com-­‐ plaints  of  police  harassment  and/or  miscon-­‐ duct,  and  documented  the  process  for  filing  a   complaint.  Released  statement  condemning  harassment   and  the  viola on  of  civil  rights  by  law  enforce-­‐ ment  and  private  security  officers  following  a   string  of  incidents  where  individuals  using  cell   phones  to  document  poten al  unprofessional   behavior  were  arrested  and  their  phones  con-­‐ fiscated.  Working  with  the  Center  for  Research  on   Women,  launched  H.O.P.E.    “Women’s  Cau-­‐ cus”  to  address  and  confront  the  dis nct  ex-­‐ periences  of  people  experiencing  homeless-­‐ ness  who  iden fy  as  women,  including  domes-­‐ c  violence,  sexual  assault,  and  inadequate   shelter  and  housing  assistance  Waged  a  successful  direct  ac on  campaign   that  included  ten  weekly  public  protests   against  a  local  shelter/service  provider  for   employing  an  individual  about  whom  H.O.P.E.   received  numerous  complaints  of  sexual  har-­‐ assment  and  unprofessional  behavior  from   consumers  and  former  staff  persons.  Used  its  regular  “Dinner  and  Discussion”   mee ngs  as  a  pla orm  to  organize  specifically   around  issues  of  violence.  Talks  resulted  in  the   launching  of  a  fundraising  campaign  for  a  five- week  intensive  self-defense  training  which   equipped  members  with  the  fundamental   skills  needed  to  handle  an  a ack  and  get  out   of  violent  situa ons  quickly.  Ini ated  plans  for   a  training  of  trainers,  where  members  can   expand  training  of  women  experiencing  home-­‐ lessness  on  self-defense  on  the  street  and  in   shelters.  Formed  the  H.O.P.E.  “Garden  Crew”,  focused   on  developing  community  gardens  to  educate   members  on  food  independence,  establish   rela onships  within  the  community  and  beau-­‐ fy  our  neighborhoods. Community-Police  Rela ons  Project   (CPR)    creates  a  safe  place  for  community  and   law  enforcement  to  openly  discuss  barriers  that   prevent  building  a  posi ve  rela onship.    These   discussions  will  result  in  recommenda ons  and  a   plan  for  ac on  to  create  healthier  community- police  rela ons  in  Memphis  and  Shelby  County.  Eight  (8)  community  forums  were  conducted   in  2013,  reaching  an  es mated  735  communi-­‐ ty  members  from  Frayser,  Hickory  Hill,  Orange   Mound,  South  Memphis,  and  for  the  LGBTQ   and  La no  communi es,  as  well  as  400  stu-­‐ dents  at  the  2013  Gandhi-King  Conference.)    A   cri cal  first  step  in  a  long-term  reconcilia on- seeking  process,  community  forums  create  an   open,  mediated  space  for  civilians  and  law   enforcement  officers  to  share  personal  experi-­‐ ences  with  another.    Employ  of  improvisa on-­‐ al  theatre  company  Playback  Memphis  as   unique  communica on  tool  for  the  forums  has   allowed  even  the  most  difficult  offerings  to  be   shared  in  a  manner  where  the  story  can  be er   be  received  without  judgment.  Core  group  members  meet  monthly,  par ci-­‐ pate  in  working  groups  (steering  commi ee,   facilita on,  media,  and  outreach)  and  volun-­‐ teer  to  assist  with  community  forums.  As  a  result  of  CPR  par cipa on,  the  Sheriff's   Office  has  strengthened  its  connec on  with   Tennessee  Equality  Project  and  the  LGBTQ   community,  and  has  designated  Detec ve   Barbara  Tolbert  as  a  liaison  for  the  LGBTQ   MPD  officers  are  volunteering  as  liaisons.  Insights  regarding  about  the  community's   thoughts/percep ons  about  law  enforcement   gained  through  CPR  involvement,  are  being   reflected  in  official  law  enforcement  trainings. Memphis  Bus  Riders  Union  (MBRU)   works  to  build  a  sustainable  grassroots  organiza-­‐ on  made  up  of  and  represen ng  transit- dependent  people  in  the  local  area  to  organize  for   be er  public  transit.  Held  12  regular  member  mee ngs  with  the   MATA  bus  patrons  about  issues  of  public   transit.  Successfully  mobilized  hundreds  of  bus  riders   and  allies  to  a end  MATA  Town  Halls  and  City   Council  budget  hearings.  Completed  dra ing   and  approval  of  by-laws  and  the  elec on  of   new  officers.  Successfully  organized  to  restore  $1.2  million   in  funding  for  MATA  and  prevent  detrimental   cuts  and  changes  including  weekend,  late   night,  and  holiday  service,  Restored  bus  service  to  President’s  Island  and   Northhaven  and  prevented  the  cu ng  of  the   Central  (U  of  M)  and  Germantown  Parkway   routes  Offered  changes  to  the  #2  Airport  MATA  bus   route  in  the  Medical  District.  Par cipated  in  the  MATA  Shelter  Advisory   Commi ee,  providing  input  on  new/needed   shelter  loca ons. “I  found  the  camaraderie  fostered  amongst  the   group  invaluable.  Not  only  did  this  allow  me  to   meet,  network,  and  begin  rela onships  with  some   truly  badass  organizers,  but  it  too  emphasizes  the   importance  of  strong  rela onships  for  the  efficacy   of  any  ac on/campaign/movement.” -  Community  Organizer  Training  Par cipant Training  and  Engagement Organizing  and  Mobilizing 10th  Annual  Gandhi-King  Community  Conference More  than  200  par cipants  engaged  in  three  tracks  of  par cipatory  workshops,  panel  discussions  and   presenta ons.    An  addi onal  400  students  engaged  in  the  2013  Gandhi-King  Youth  Conference.  Plenary   Speakers:  Medea  Benjamin    of  CodePink  Women  for  Peace  &  Jaribu  Hill  of  Mississippi  Workers  Center Track  1:  Personal  Nonviolence:  Nonviolent  Communica on,  Vulnerability  and  Realness  in  Organizing,   Interfaith  Roundtable,  De-stressing  with  Yoga Track  2:  Nonviolence  in  Academia:  Comple ng  the  Circle  in  King's  Sociology,  Teaching  the  Holocaust  as  General  Educa on,  Pilgrimage  as  Poli cal   Spirituality,  Gandhi's  Programme  -  King's  Jus ce Track  3:  Movement-Building  Nonviolence:  Community  Police  Rela ons,  Public  Transit  Reform,  Nonviolence  and  Nonviolent  Interven on  Training,   Civil  Disobedience  in  the  TN  Immigrant  Rights  Movement,  War  on  Poverty  and  Homelessness ORGANIZE  for  Grassroots  Change:   Consistent,  coordinated  and  support-­‐ ed  organizing  that  li s  up  and  brings   together  the  grassroots  voices  of  our   communi es  to  work  toward  a  vision   of  libera on  and  social  jus ce   ENGAGE  Communi es  in  Building  Power:  Grass-­‐ roots  leadership  development  and  organizer  train-­‐ ing  to  rebuild  the  capacity  of  low  income  and  mar-­‐ ginalized  communi es  to  organize  for  peace,  jus ce   and  power MOBILIZE  Our  Power  for  Jus ce:   Mobilizing  our  community  to  create   posi ve  change  and  win  victories   that  are  based  upon  the  collec ve,   organized  power  of  those  most   affected  by  injus ce

Trained 524 in grassroots organizing + Pre- vented $250,000 in homeless service cuts + Secured a $10,000 grant to launch Street- wise INK + Participated in Greenprint + Partnered in 8 community police relations forums for 335 residents + Stopped “Play to Stay” abuse in a local shelter + Cele- brated 10 years of the Gandhi- King Confer- ence + Expand- ed to provide Community Or- ganizer Training in Spanish + Prevent- ed $1.2 million in cuts to MATA funding + Coordinated People’s Day on the Hill + Collaborated to host city-wide People’s Conference on Race and Equality + Supported publi- cation of Memphis’ first street newspa-­ per + H.O.P.E. Women’s Caucus Mem-­ bers trained in Self Defense 2013  Board Emily  Fulmer  —  Chair GrowMemphis Dana  Wilson  —  Secretary BRIDGES Federico  Gomez—  Treasurer La no  Cultural  Center  of  Memphis Nabil  Bayakly Muslims  in  Memphis Janis  Benson A orney Marquita  Bradshaw Defense  Depot  of  Memphis,  TN  Concerned  Ci zens   Commi ee Cris na  Condori Comunidades  Unidas  con  Una  Voz Paul  Crum Pax  Chris  Memphis Carolyn  Head Southwest  Tennessee  Community  College Onie  G.  Johns Caritas  Village Kyle  Kordsmeier Workers  Interfaith  Network Cody  Mathis Student  Organizer Tiffany  Futch Women’s  Ac on  Coali on Staff Allison  Glass—Training  Director Brad  Watkins—Organizing  Director Brooke  Sarden—Opera ons  Director Giovanna  Lopez—Training  Coordinator Jacob  Flowers—Execu ve  Director Melissa  Miller-Monie—Organizing  Coordinator Paul  Garner—Organizing  Coordinator The  inherent  power  of  the  individual:  We  know  the  people  we   work  with  hold  the  power  to  ini ate  and  advance  posi ve   change  in  their  communi es,  and  it’s  these  people  who  must  be   the  leaders  in  campaigns  to  improve  their  lives. Communi es  of  libera on:  We  work  to  create  a  world  without   oppression.  We  recognize  that  the  roots  of  oppression  run  deep   systemically  and  within  ourselves.  We  implement  strategies  of   an -oppression  within  every  facet  of  our  organizing  and  within   our  organiza on  itself. Achieving  nonviolent  solu ons  using  nonviolent  strategy:  The   MSPJC  was  founded  on  the  nonviolent  principles  of  Mohandas   Gandhi  and  Mar n  Luther  King,  Jr.  We  know  that  the  most  pow-­‐ erful  change  can  only  be  brought  about  using  nonviolent   means,  and  we  are  dedicated  to  prac cing  and  teaching  nonvio-­‐ lent  ac on. Our  Values Grassroots  Organizing  Con nued Greenprint:  MSPJC  is  the  staff  organiza on  for  the  Social  Equity  Working  Group   of  the  Mid-South  Regional  Greenprint  Consor um.    The  chair  of  the  Social  Equity   Working  Group  is  Mia  Madison  of  City  of  Memphis  Division  of  Housing  and  Commu-­‐ nity  Development.  Coordinated  monthly  mee ngs  and  ac vi es  of  the  group,  which  is  responsible   for  ensuring  that  Greenprint  outreach  and  engagement  ac vi es  reach  minori-­‐ es,  disabled  persons,  elderly  persons,  persons  with  Limited  English  Proficien-­‐ cy,  and  other  under-represented  popula ons.    Provides  perspec ve  on  environmental  jus ce  and  “Not  in  My  Back-­‐ yard”  (NIMBY)  issues.    Strategizes  to  increase  par cipa on  in  the  regional  planning  process,  par cu-­‐ larly  with  respect  to  engagement  of  low-income  communi es,  minority  popula-­‐ ons,  and  other  communi es  typically  underrepresented  in  regional  planning.   Memphis  United:  MSPJC  is  a  501(c)(3)  sponsor  and  a  founding  member   Worked  in  coali on  with  over  20  local  community  and  grassroots  organiza ons  to   host  the  “People’s  Conference  on  Race  and  Equality:  a  part  of  the  Heart  of  Mem-­‐ phis”,  in  response  to  a  KKK  rally  downtown  that  same  day.    A racted  more  than   1,500  par cipants  in  panel  discussions,  workshops  and  other  awareness-building   ac vi es.  Designed  workshops  and  provided  material  and  staff  support.      Co-hosted  a  forum  on  Interna onal  Workers  Day  about  local  issues  related  to   worker  jus ce. The  Bridge:  MSPJC  is  the  501(c)(3)  sponsor  for  The  Bridge,  Memphis’  first  street   newspaper,  produced  and  sold  by  vendors  experiencing  homelessness.  Provided  technical  support  and  assistance  in  outreach  to  people  experiencing   homelessness.   Statewide  Organizing:  Coordinated  the  March  12th  “People’s  Day  on  the  Hill”.  This  effort  joined  grass-­‐ roots  and  progressive  organiza ons  that  had  previously  held  separate  lobby   days,  to  come  together  for  support  and  solidarity.  Par cipants  included  Cha a-­‐ nooga  Organized  for  Ac on,  Statewide  Organizing  for  Community  Empower-­‐ ment,  Tennessee  Immigrant  and  Refugee  Rights  Coali on,  Workers  Interfaith   Network,    Workers  Dignity  Project,  Healthy  &  Free  Tennessee,  Tennessee   Equality  Project,  Tennessee  Transgender  Poli cal  Ac on  Coali on,    AFSCME   Local  1733,    Tennessee  Ci zen  Ac on,  and  Memphis  Bus  Riders  Union.  Produced  a  comprehensive  guide  to  bills  of  interest  to  grassroots  communi es   that  was  distributed  to  lobby  day  par cipants  and  used  statewide  as  a  resource   for  our  community  members  at  home.  Coordinated  movement-building  space  in  a  nearby  church  that  included  lobby   training,  tes monial  and  learning  space,  and  a  central  place  for  all  groups  to   base  their  efforts  on  The  Hill. Organizing  and  mobilizing  people  to  realize   social  jus ce  through  nonviolent  ac on. Annual  Report   2013 Mid-South  Peace  and  Jus ce  Center 3573  Southern  Ave Memphis,  TN  38111 www.midsouthpeace.org 901.725.4990 Our  Mission

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