2010TourismOrganisin gPlan

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Published on March 21, 2008

Author: Samantha

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Slide1:  Department of Environmental Affairs & Tourism Draft 2010 Soccer World Cup Tourism Organising Plan November 2005 Key project questions:  Key project questions Ensuring sustainability of investments What strategic opportunities are available for sports-tourism competitiveness in the run-up to and after 2010? Mapping and competitiveness diagnostic of the key elements of the sports tourism industry in South Africa To achieve the 2010 tourism objectives we need to capitalise on opportunities presented by the World Cup and address key tourism challenges:  To achieve the 2010 tourism objectives we need to capitalise on opportunities presented by the World Cup and address key tourism challenges Position South Africa to Achieve its Tourism mandate and broader 2010 Objectives… … by… …through coordinated interventions within each functional area. Executive summary of findings:  Executive summary of findings Poor access to channels and tourism information Insufficient accommodation Insufficient compelling attractions & activities Inadequate service levels and skills shortage Inadequate public transport Insufficient focus on tourist safety & security Limited institutional capacity Managing expectations Demand management Displacement of general tourists around the event Initiatives have been grouped into specific functional areas to facilitate the implementation process: Information Marketing and Branding Tourism-friendly transport and tourist safety & security Accommodation Events and attractions Skills and service levels The event presents a platform to help South Africa achieve its tourism mandate and objectives By taking advantage of opportunities to: Maximise value during the event Maximise value after the event About R11 billion in tourism revenue could be generated during the event Obtain buy-in and sign-off of the plan from the Minister A tourism 2010 unit is to be set-up within SAT, reporting to the CEO, for: Planning, Management & Monitoring Co-ordination of Initiatives Stakeholder Management Inter-governmental coordination in respect of tourism through DEAT and the TCC Agenda:  Agenda Context and objectives of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan Overview of the 2010 Soccer World Cup opportunity Key challenges for tourism around 2010 Key tourism-related initiatives Making it happen Broader objectives of the 2010 Soccer World Cup Event:  Broader objectives of the 2010 Soccer World Cup Event In its bid to host the Soccer World Cup in 2010, South Africa highlighted the key objectives for the event as: Hosting a world-class African World Cup Ensuring a lasting social legacy through the event Leveraging the event to spread economic and social benefits beyond the borders of South Africa May 15, 2004 - South Africa wins bid for 2010 World Cup The goals of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan are in line with the broader objectives for the event and the growth and competitiveness agenda for tourism:  The goals of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan are in line with the broader objectives for the event and the growth and competitiveness agenda for tourism Maximise the opportunity to brand South Africa as a tourism destination Have a positive impact on social legacy through advancing the tourism competitiveness agenda to support objectives of creating jobs, growth and equity Maximise value during the event Maximise value after the event Key Objectives of the Tourism Organising Plan * FIFA – Fédération Internationale de Football Association The Tourism Organising Plan is an important part of the preparation for the 2010 World Cup:  The Tourism Organising Plan is an important part of the preparation for the 2010 World Cup * LOC – Local Organising Committee **TCC – Technical Coordinating Committee Source: www.fifa.com, DEAT 05/04 05/05 01/06 2009 08/05 11/05 11/02 01/06 06/10 However, given our timeline, there are several outstanding decisions that impact on the final form of the plan:  However, given our timeline, there are several outstanding decisions that impact on the final form of the plan Due to the nature of the event, the following decisions have not yet been finalised and the information will be released according to a specific FIFA timeline: Host locations Match venues Match schedule Qualifying teams Other key locations – team bases, practice venues, practice matches, friendly matches, etc. This requires that the plan should be flexible to accommodate the outcomes of these decisions i.e. there will be a need to refine the plan as key decisions are made Agenda:  Agenda Context and objectives of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan Overview of the 2010 Soccer World Cup opportunity Key challenges for tourism around 2010 Key tourism-related initiatives Making it happen Summary of tourism-related opportunities presented by the World Cup:  Summary of tourism-related opportunities presented by the World Cup *To be discussed in later sections Increase in tourist arrivals Widespread media exposure and focus on South Africa Increase tourism revenue in 2010 through the event Upgrade the tourism supply-side to meet demand in 2010 and to significantly enhance South Africa’s tourism competitiveness in the long-term* Enhance South Africa’s brand as a world-class tourism destination The event presents a platform to help South Africa achieve its tourism mandate and objectives:  The event presents a platform to help South Africa achieve its tourism mandate and objectives The Tourism Act’s mandate is ... . . . through six key objectives . . . . . . by acting in a focused way to . . . Achieving these objectives will allow South Africa to build on its tourism performance to date…:  Achieving these objectives will allow South Africa to build on its tourism performance to date… Foreign Tourist Arrivals to South Africa (1998 - 2004) Source: SAT Arrival Statistics CAGR98-04 = 2.6% Number of foreign arrivals …and further increase South Africa’s performance relative to its main competitors:  …and further increase South Africa’s performance relative to its main competitors Total Number of Tourist Arrivals, 1999 – 2003 Number of Arrivals (Index)* Note: *Indexed to 100 for 1999 for all countries; No 2003 data available for Kenya and Brazil Source: Global Competitiveness Report; ATC, Tourism Authority of Thailand, Embassy of Brazil in London, ITA Office of Travel and Tourism Industries Arrivals to South Africa have steadily increased, which analysts believe is amongst others due to more focused and better marketing Arrivals During the event, the total number of foreign arrivals is estimated to be 445,000…:  Arrivals During the event, the total number of foreign arrivals is estimated to be 445,000… Number of participants (Thousand) Average tickets per spectator Ratio without tickets vs. with tickets 445* Total Foreign Arrivals = *Assuming that 50% of sponsors are foreign arrivals; **Majority of these participants are expected to stay less than one night in a location and thus are classified as non-tourists Note: # of participants with tickets = # of tickets / average tickets per participant; # of participants without tickets = # of participants with tickets x (# without tickets / # with tickets); Sponsor tickets are primarily for fans through sponsor sweep stakes Source: Monitor analysis based on input from MATCH Non-tourist participants** Arrivals … this is in the same range as the projected international air arrivals in the December peak in 2010:  Arrivals … this is in the same range as the projected international air arrivals in the December peak in 2010 Number of international air arrivals Comparison of 2004 number of international air arrivals per month with 2010 estimates Note: The number of air arrivals are the sum of international arrivals at JNB and CPT airports; The average arrivals number includes about 100,000 South African citizens; Growth of about 6% per annum was used from 2004 to 2010 based on the historic growth rate of all air arrivals Source: ACSA, SAT, Monitor Analysis If air access is not managed non- World Cup air arrivals will be displaced since most of the capacity in 2010 will be required by World Cup travellers 2004 Actual 2010 Estimates Revenue Total tourism revenue generated during the event is expected to be around R11 billion…:  X = Revenue Total tourism revenue generated during the event is expected to be around R11 billion… Note: Expected tourism revenue does not include ticket sales, spend by participating teams, other spend on sponsorships, merchandising, concessions and FIFA conferences; In addition to the R11bn, spectators from the host provinces will spend an estimated R 1.3 billion (non tourism spend); Assumed domestic spend will be higher than R457 (average spend in 2003) due to higher spend by regional participants; All numbers are in 2004 constant money terms, i.e. inflation was not taken into account ; International, PMA, FIFA & Sponsors spend is on airlift, accommodation, meals, medical, recreation, shopping & transport Source: CWC Economic Impact Study, GT 2010 Soccer World Cup Bid Report, Departure Survey, Monitor Analysis = Spend per day x Average length of stay Average length of stay (Days) Spend per day (Rand) Average Spend per Arrival (Rand) Number of Arrivals (Thousand) Total Expected Spend (Rand million) Revenue … this could be increased by using different tactics in each demand constituency:  Revenue … this could be increased by using different tactics in each demand constituency Constraints per demand constituency Opportunities to increase spend * - May increase the need for accommodation and transport Branding The 2010 FIFA World Cup presents significant opportunities to raise awareness of South Africa as a tourism destination…:  Branding The 2010 FIFA World Cup presents significant opportunities to raise awareness of South Africa as a tourism destination… Number of viewers (billion)** Total number of TV viewers** per FIFA World Cup, 1986-2002 * According to FIFA, viewership for France 98 was over weighted because of the auditing methods used in China, where viewership figures were based on rankings in Shanghai which were then multiplied by a factor to estimate the audience for the entire country ** The number of viewers is cumulative as it counts the number of viewers over the number of days the event was hosted. There is therefore double-counting Source: www.fifa.com TV coverage in more than 210 countries 1.1 billion people watched the final in Korea More women (mainly in Asia) watched the matches than in previous world cups Out of home viewing and big screen viewing increased significantly Japan / Korea - 2002 The number of TV viewers in 2010 will probably be higher than in 2002 since South Africa is in the same time zone as most soccer loving countries Branding …and to increase SA’s market share in core markets while capitalising on new markets such as Brazil:  Branding …and to increase SA’s market share in core markets while capitalising on new markets such as Brazil Core Markets Kenya Nigeria USA UK Australia France Germany Netherlands Tactical Markets Tanzania India Botswana Lesotho Swaziland Investment Markets Angola Mauritius Canada China Japan Mozambique Zambia Zimbabwe Watch-List Markets Ghana Senegal Brazil Malaysia New Zealand Singapore Belgium Ireland Italy Sweden Switzerland Strategic Hubs Egypt UAE Likely to participate in the 2010 WC Source: SAT Tourism Portfolio 2005-2009, Monitor Analysis A large number of arrivals are expected to be from South African Tourism’s key source markets Agenda:  Agenda Context and objectives of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan Overview of the 2010 Soccer World Cup opportunity Key challenges for tourism around 2010 Key tourism-related initiatives Making it happen Summary of key tourism-related challenges for 2010:  Summary of key tourism-related challenges for 2010 Workshops were conducted with each of the potential host cities to identify the key tourism supply-side challenges around the 2010 event Port Elizabeth Cape Town Durban Johannesburg Pretoria Nelspruit Polokwane Rustenburg Bloemfontein Kimberley Klerksdorp To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services:  To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services Safety and Security Information Accommodation Attractions / Events Services provided by the tourism sector Service Levels / Skills Transport Services provided by other sectors On match days, the number of people in the host cities is likely to exceed stadium capacity which has implications for the tourism supply-side:  Rustenburg Polokwane Kimberley Johannesburg Soccer City Cape Town On match days, the number of people in the host cities is likely to exceed stadium capacity which has implications for the tourism supply-side *Majority of these participants are expected to stay less than one night in a location and thus are classified as non-tourists Note: Based on scenario given in the presentation from the LOC in July 2005; Assumed 7% seat kill ( i.e. only 93% of the stadium capacity is available for spectators); Source: Monitor Analysis Estimated expected arrivals per match per host location Number of Arrivals # Matches Size of Stadium These participants are not tourists and the majority will not require accommodation* Significant supply gaps currently exist in most potential host cities :  Significant supply gaps currently exist in most potential host cities Note: The ratings are meant to be directional; Accommodation rating is based on quantitative analysis while the rest of the ratings are qualitative Source: Monitor Analysis Qualitative rating of size of gap between 2010 demand and supply in each of the host cities Supply categories Potential host cities Low Medium High Size of gap Summary of challenges across the host cities (1 of 2):  Summary of challenges across the host cities (1 of 2) Lack of an integrated information platform that provides access to tourism products Constrained product – particularly SMME access to the channel Incomplete picture in terms of what tourism products currently exist There is generally a shortage of tourist information centres and public facilities Accommodation requirements for 2010 significantly exceed existing capacity in a number of host locations Insufficient supply of graded accommodation There is no national booking platform to enable transactions with service providers Uneven spread and limited diversity of attractions and activities that are appealing to tourists Some product gaps exist that need to be addressed (e.g. cultural products require improvement, limited evening entertainment) Insufficient packaging of tourism products into experiences Insufficient compelling attractions & activities Source: Qualitative interviews with host cites; Insights from Global Competitiveness Project Summary of challenges across the host cities (2 of 2):  Summary of challenges across the host cities (2 of 2) Shortage of skills was identified by the GCP and was again amplified in the interactions with the cities Lack of commitment and leadership to address the problem Specific gaps raised in interactions with host cities include language training, service standards, management skills, limited number of tourist guides Source: Qualitative interviews with host cites; Insights from Global Competitiveness Project (GCP) Some international air routes are constrained The bulk of the public transportation in most of the cities is provided by mini-bus taxis which would not be appropriate to meet the demand for 2010 due to roadworthiness and safety challenges Tourism is lower priority on the transport agenda Tourism signage and general route identification are inadequate Constraints exist within the transport regulatory framework that make it non-friendly to tourism (mainly regulations regarding route-based permits and licensing of tour operators) Although all the cities seem to have safety and security contingency plans, there is limited specific focus on tourist safety Negative perception around crime Limited tourism-related crime prevention capacity Lack of a national tourism safety and security plan Insufficient focus on tourist safety and security To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services:  To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services Safety and Security Information Accommodation Attractions / Events Services provided by the tourism sector Service Levels / Skills Transport Services provided by other sectors Channels and information access issues:  Channels and information access issues Poor information availability and distribution Lack of an integrated information platform that provides comprehensive access to tourism-related products Limited connection between SAT’s website and the numerous fulfillment -focused sites at city and provincial level Difficult to access information on events and activities while in destination There is generally a shortage of tourist information centres Limited access to accommodation capacity information Small and emerging players have difficulty accessing channels and markets There is no national booking / contracting platform to enable transactions with service providers (especially SMMEs) ”Accommodation information on the website is static. Live data on available accommodation capacity does not exist “ – Tourism official ”New tourism businesses, particularly SMMEs have limited access to the channels and there is not enough collaboration with established operators “ – Tourism official From a business perspective, the lack of consumer and market information is a barrier to accessing potential tourists :  From a business perspective, the lack of consumer and market information is a barrier to accessing potential tourists The major reasons why tourism product owners are not reaching their prospective customers overseas Outbound operators make poor choices in what they decide to communicate to prospective customers Inbound and outbound tour operators do not communicate effectively Inbound tour operators do not have sufficient knowledge of the industry Product owners do not know who their target customers are / should be Product owners do not have sufficient marketing and sales skills Product owners do not have the necessary resources Percentage of Respondents Product owners appear to lack resources, marketing and sales skills and information on customer segments. Source: GCP Quantitative Industry Survey, 2003 / 2004 To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services:  To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services Safety and Security Information Attractions / Events Services provided by the tourism sector Service Levels / Skills Transport Services provided by other sectors Estimated accommodation requirement per host city per match:  Estimated accommodation requirement per host city per match Beds Required per Match = Arrivals – Domestic other provinces Number of Beds Estimated Maximum Number of Beds Required per Match Arrivals – PMA and International Arrivals – FIFA and Sponsors + + Port Elizabeth Nelspruit Gauteng Cape Town Assuming one match at each of the following stadiums: Soccer City; Lofus and Ellis Park Note: Assuming that 70% of domestic arrivals from other provinces will stay with friends or relatives or return home on the same day Assuming matches at Soccer City and Loftus 109,700 Estimated accommodation supply per host location:  Estimated accommodation supply per host location Note: 1 2010 comparative city analysis data 2 Only information on number of rooms was available. Thus we assumed 2 beds per room for the calculation of number of beds. 3The anticipated growth is mainly informed by estimated arrivals numbers and occupancy rates Source: Host City Interviews, 2010 comparative city analysis, SA Tourism, StatsSA, Monitor Analysis Limited information of available accommodation due to the lack of a regularly updated database in most of the cities These number were provided by the host cities and should be verified going forward Accommodation requirements significantly exceed existing capacity for a number of host locations:  Accommodation requirements significantly exceed existing capacity for a number of host locations KEY Note: * Data quality issue, need to reassess supply to ensure appropriate rating Source: Host City Interviews, 2010 comparative city analysis, Monitor Analysis This highlights the need to identify alternative accommodation or provide adequate transportation to move people in and out of the host cities The number of graded accommodation may not be sufficient to meet requirements in 2010:  The number of graded accommodation may not be sufficient to meet requirements in 2010 Note: We used the percentage graded establishments per province figures as a proxy to calculate the rooms graded per city. Source: 2010 Comparative City Analysis, Qualitative Interviews with Host Cities, TGCSA submission to MIPTECH, Monitor Analysis Number of Graded vs. Ungraded Rooms per Host City, 2004 Port Elizabeth Nelspruit Johannesburg Cape Town Number of Rooms With the exception of Gauteng, Nelspruit and Port Elizabeth grading of accommodation is still fairly low in several of the potential host cities Tshwane To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services:  To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services Safety and Security Accommodation Services provided by the tourism sector Service Levels / Skills Transport Services provided by other sectors Attractions / Events The existence of certain product gaps may hamper our ability to maximise tourism value from the event:  The existence of certain product gaps may hamper our ability to maximise tourism value from the event Source: Qualitative interviews with host cities, Monitor Analysis There is an uneven spread and limited diversity of attractions and activities that are appealing to tourists Although several host cities and their surrounding areas have a significant number of attractions, there are still some product gaps, i.e. Cultural products (museums, township tours etc) require improvement and diversification Few adventure activities and evening entertainment offerings Attractions need to be renovated / upgraded Inconsistent pricing of products Inadequate and under-developed township tourism Insufficient packaging of tourism products into experiences Inadequate transport linkages to attractions in the cities and surrounding areas Incomplete picture in terms of what tourism products currently exist Product gaps – Overseas tourist product desire and usage pattern:  Product gaps – Overseas tourist product desire and usage pattern Note: Desired experience covers desires for a good holiday experience irrespective of destination Source: GCP Analysis, 1SAT Departure Survey (jan-Nov2003), 2SAT/Monitor segmentation work 2001-2003, Monitor Analysis Desired Experience-Usage Profile for International Tourists, 2003 Usage Profile, % of Segment1 Low High Low High Desired Experience, Index (Level of Importance)2 Health Adventure Medical Theme parks Wildlife Trading Cultural historical and heritage Sporting Business Visiting natural attractions Beach Visited a Casino, Social Nightlife Shopping High Desire, Low Usage – We don’t have the product, or the product is not being used Knowledge of consumer needs, and efficient information are key Low Desire, High Usage – The necessary but not sufficient products indicates a potential need for intervention around educating the channel on the requirements of tourists For overseas travelers, the key gaps in their experience (as measured by the rate of usage of products compared to their desire for such products) were culture and adventure. Product gaps – Domestic tourist product desire and usage pattern:  Product gaps – Domestic tourist product desire and usage pattern Source: GCP Analysis, 1SAT Domestic Survey 2003, 2HSRC (for SAT and DEAT) Domestic Survey 2001 The absence of products which fall into the high-desire, high-usage profile raises questions about: familiarity with the products; access constraints; etc. Usage Profile, % of Segment1 Desired Experience (% interested in activity) Desired Experience-Usage Profile for All Domestic Tourists, 2003 Low High Low High Health Adventure Medical Theme parks Wildlife Trading Cultural historical and heritage Sporting Business Visiting natural attractions Other Beach None Nightlife Shopping Social e.g. visiting family/friends Industry views regarding tourism products meeting tourist expectations:  Industry views regarding tourism products meeting tourist expectations The current tourism product offering in SA meets the expectations of international tourists From the industry’s perspective there appears to be more room for improvement within the domestic market. Configuration and pricing for the international market has important implications of access for the domestic market Source: GCP Quantitative Industry Survey 2004 % of Respondents The current tourism product offering in SA meets the expectations of domestic tourists % of Respondents To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services:  To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services Safety and Security Accommodation Services provided by the tourism sector Transport Services provided by other sectors Shortage of skills and poor service levels were highlighted in the interactions with the potential host cities:  Shortage of skills and poor service levels were highlighted in the interactions with the potential host cities Inadequate commitment and leadership to address the problem Lack of a coordinated and integrated drive to address skills gaps Weak linkages between the tourism industry and the training institutions There is an acknowledged shortage of tourism skills Gaps raised in interactions with the potential host cities included: Limited management, marketing and project implementation skills Insufficient number of tourist guides Limited language capabilities A lack of a service ethic and poor service levels ”Inadequate skills and poor service levels are generally a problem. There are lots of B&Bs opening without appropriate skills” – Tourism official Reasons for dissatisfaction (less than 10% of all tourists to SA)**:  Reasons for dissatisfaction (less than 10% of all tourists to SA)** * Calculated as a percentage of those respondents with expectations not met **Out of a total of 1,390 respondents surveyed, SA failed to impress 6% of leisure tourists and 13% of business travellers Source: GCP Analysis, Tourist Satisfaction Index, 2004 Percent of Segment* Overall Holiday Experience, 2004 Percent of Segment Below Expectations Substantially Below Expectations Met My Expectations Exceeded Expectations Exceeded Expectations Substantially Price Value for Money Flexibility of Itinerary Authentic Experience Uniqueness Service Levels Availability / Ease of Access Quality Other Characteristics Failing to Meet Expectations, 2004 While overall satisfaction levels are very high (91%), there signals from the small minority of dissatisfied tourists that service levels are an issue Industry views about skills and business growth:  Industry views about skills and business growth “ There is a pool of human resources available in your region that meet your business growth needs” Source: GCP Quantitative Industry Survey 2004 The industry is of the view that skill shortages are constraining the growth of the industry Response of industry to perceived gaps in the training system:  Response of industry to perceived gaps in the training system “ Advanced educational programs in your region provide your business with high quality employees” “ The responsibility to upgrade the labor lies principally with the private sector active in the tourism industry” Industry's view that training institutions are not producing appropriately trained employees most likely accounts for their implementation of in-house training of employees Source: GCP Quantitative Industry Survey, 2003 / 2004 To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services:  To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services Safety and Security Accommodation Services provided by the tourism sector Service Levels / Skills Services provided by other sectors In 2010, there may be concentrated peaks on some international routes that will exceed existing capacity:  In 2010, there may be concentrated peaks on some international routes that will exceed existing capacity Route Capacity Utilizations - 2004 Percentage Note: 1) C: Number of months the route is constrained (load factor>=75%) in the given year 2) The load factors for US-SA are not released due to confidentiality reasons, since there is currently one major player in this market * SAA has added additional capacity on the Paris route Source: ACSA Route Capacity Utilizations - 2002 Route Capacity Utilizations - 2003 Percentage C1 : Percentage Currently, 3 key routes to SA are constrained and need to be extended by establishing partnerships to ensure flexibility to react to spikes in demand and / or addressing regulatory barriers to un-constraining the routes Similarly, there may be concentrated peaks on some domestic routes in 2010:  Similarly, there may be concentrated peaks on some domestic routes in 2010 Currently, only the three main domestic air routes are capacity constrained. A high load factor usually leads to a capacity increase in the following years, thus small routes are unlikely to get more capacity even though some of these routes do not currently have sufficient capacity or frequency 40-60% 61-70% 71-80% Load Factor Average Load Factor on Domestic Routes, 2004 Source: 2004 ACSA statistics Public transportation is an issue in South Africa and there is a need for investments to improve current transport infrastructure:  Industry’s view on top priority investment areas** % of respondents who felt this is a top priority *Public facilities: toilets, beach dressing rooms and showers, etc; **Infrastructure assets that are in most urgent need of government investment to enable an effective tourism service Source: Qualitative interviews with host cities; GCP Quantitative Industry Survey, 2003 / 2004 Public transportation is an issue in South Africa and there is a need for investments to improve current transport infrastructure The tourism industry should ensure that there is sufficient transportation to tourism attractions:  The tourism industry should ensure that there is sufficient transportation to tourism attractions 1 Match related transportation includes transport from the airport/railway station to hotel and to the stadiums 2 COASA – Coach Operators Association of Southern Africa; 44 seaters are classified as luxury coaches while 60-seaters are semi-luxury vehicles Source: Monitor Analysis Inadequate and unsatisfactory public transportation Inflexible commuter transport schedules and unreliable services There may be concentrated peaks on some routes (air and road) Categories of transportation required in 2010 Limited transportation to tourist attractions Available public transport capacity will be taken up to provide match-related transportation (i.e. airport to hotel and hotel to stadium or townships to stadium) COASA2 currently has 750 coaches with a 50:50 split between 44 seater and 60 seater vehicles There are very few metered taxis in the cities Inflexible commuter transport schedules and unreliable services Regulations around tourism transport services (e.g. licensing of tour operators and route-based permits) may reduce flexibility to move existing capacity around the country To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services:  To ensure that arrivals have satisfactory experiences, the host cities will have to provide the following services Accommodation Services provided by the tourism sector Service Levels / Skills Transport Services provided by other sectors Consumers lost to SA because of safety concerns:  Consumers lost to SA because of safety concerns (000’s) USA UK Germany France Netherlands Australia India China Consumers not Travelling to SA due to Safety Concerns 2005 (Thousands) Across 8 key markets, 22,25 million potential travellers did not consider South Africa over the last 5 years because they were concerned about safety Note: Of all who have not visited SA, Question from SAT Brand Tracker: “Why haven’t you visited South Africa for leisure purposes in the past 5 years? (Select all that apply)” Source: GCP Analysis, SAT Market Segmentation Studies, SAT Brand Tracker, January 2005, Monitor analysis Proportion of Target Market 39.2% 36.3% 32.3% 25.2% 27.0% 35.3% 27.6% 39.0% Total: 22,25 million 33.8% of target market across 8 countries Slide53:  Industry’s view on top priority investment areas** % of respondents who felt this was a top priority *Public facilities: toilets, beach dressing rooms and showers, etc; **Infrastructure assets that are in most urgent need of government investment to enable an effective tourism service Source: Qualitative interviews with host cities; GCP Quantitative Industry Survey, 2003 / 2004 Negative perception around crime Issues around safety and security remain top of mind for many tourists Limited crime prevention capacity Not enough resource allocation and limited pro-active approaches to crime prevention Insufficient focus on tourist safety and security Although all the cities seem to have safety and security contingency plans, there is limited specific focus on tourist safety Lack of a national tourist safety and security plan SAPS and DSS need to be key players in the development of a National Tourism Safety and Security Plan No leverage of promising provincial strategies to a national level The South African industry regards tourist safety and security as the single biggest priority for government intervention Other 2010 tourism-related challenges:  Other 2010 tourism-related challenges Some of the cities have limited experience/capacity in hosting major events Limited interaction between the public and the private sector in some cities Insufficient tourism budget Inadequate expectations management may result in over-investment in tourism products for 2010 The lack of knowledge of the ‘real’ accommodation capacity in the host cities may also lead to over-investment in new capacity Source: Qualitative interviews with host cities, Monitor Analysis Displacement of general tourists in the months (possibly years) before, during and after the World Cup could negatively impact tourism revenue in 2010 The potential negative economic impact of tourist displacement around the 2010 World Cup is estimated to be about R2.5 billion to R4.9 billion There are several factors that affect the volume and distribution of demand Ticketing policy, choice of host locations, stadia capacities, match schedule, non-ticket holder participation, ease of access to host locations These factors present some choices around how to proactively manage the profile of demand If displacement is not actively managed, the net revenue impact of 2010 could be reduced by 25% to 50%:  If displacement is not actively managed, the net revenue impact of 2010 could be reduced by 25% to 50% Spend (Rand million) Note: The displacement was calculated on a monthly basis. 2% displacement in best case scenario is informed by displacement in Korea in 2002. But this number is low because the September 11 attacks displaced general tourists in 2001; All numbers in 2004 terms, i.e. inflation was not taken into account Source: SA Tourism, KNTO, Governor of Utah, London Olympics 2012 Economic Analysis, Monitor Analysis Spend (Rand (million) Effect of displacement on the net additional spend Effect of displacement on the net additional spend Worst case scenario - Displacement of 90% during and 10% in each of the 2 months before & after the event Best case scenario - Displacement of 60% during and 2% in each of the two months before & after the event Foreign spend only Foreign spend only Managing demand should assist in reducing the costs associated with organising the 2010 World Cup:  Managing demand should assist in reducing the costs associated with organising the 2010 World Cup There is significant cost attached to the provision of tourism services This implies that choices need to be made on how to manage key factors effecting demand during the event Factors influencing demand Number of tickets distributed to different demand constituencies influences the demand for accommodation and transportation Ticketing policy and pricing could reduce the burden on small locations by e.g. selling more tickets to domestic participants to decrease the need for accommodation Host locations with underdeveloped tourism infrastructure may not realise the expected return on investments There is a need to analyse the cost vs. benefit for these cities and consider reallocating matches to larger cities Stadium capacities will influence accommodation requirements in host locations Match plans should take into account accommodation and transport requirements especially in Gauteng The number of visitors without tickets will significantly influence demand for transportation and accommodation Improving accessibility of transport could reduce the need for accommodation especially for participants from other domestic provinces Limiting the demand from within host provinces to travel to match locations (e.g. move virtual stadia to the people and events to the tourists) could improve accessibility Agenda:  Agenda Context and objectives of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan Overview of the 2010 Soccer World Cup opportunity Key challenges for tourism around 2010 Key tourism-related initiatives Making it happen Demand and supply challenges re-grouped into the key focus areas…:  Demand and supply challenges re-grouped into the key focus areas… The symptoms and possible solutions for some of these challenges are inter-related. Therefore, we grouped the challenges into the three focus areas of SAT’s integrated marketing strategy Key challenges identified Integrated focus areas ….and therefore interventions for 2010 are required at each step of the SAT marketing framework with a focus on delivery:  Leverage ….and therefore interventions for 2010 are required at each step of the SAT marketing framework with a focus on delivery Recruitment Experience Delivery 1. 4. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 12. 15. 5. 11. 13. Develop a robust database of available products Identify 2010-related opportunities to brand South Africa as a world-class tourism destination Cross-cutting initiatives 17.. 18. 16. 14. 3. 2. Grouping the initiatives into specific functional areas will facilitate the implementation process:  Grouping the initiatives into specific functional areas will facilitate the implementation process Create a national content management platform Create interface to enable transaction booking Research WC demand to better understand profile, perceptions and expectations Scale-up SAT call-centre Create a 2010 national tourism volunteer program Identify and utilise opportunities to capture information about 2010 arrivals Develop a robust database of available products Engage with key stakeholders in SA and neighbouring countries to package products for 2010 and to manage displacement Deliver the brand to convert arrivals to brand ambassadors Identify 2010-related opportunities to brand South Africa as a world-class tourism destination Manage displacement Increase the number of graded establishments Identify existing and alternative accommodation for short-term spikes in demand Ensure sufficient tourism-friendly public transportation to tourism focal points Ensure completion & implementation of a national tourism safety plan Address poor service levels and skills shortages at key consumer touch points Coordinate event planning to maximise tourism value from the event Coordinate development and upgrading of attractions Requires coordination Accommodation Transport & Safety Skills & Service Levels Marketing & Branding Information Events & Attractions 1. 2. 3. 12. 13. 14. 15. 17.. 16. 18. 5. 6. 10. 11. 9. 7. 8. 4. Information functional group 2010 provides the opportunity to move from generic information provision to an integrated fulfilment offering:  Information functional group 2010 provides the opportunity to move from generic information provision to an integrated fulfilment offering Product Database Product Owners National Content Management Platform Consumer Cities / Provinces SAT surveys Channels Web Call centre Trade partners Promotions through FIFA sponsors Information centres Volunteers Other consumer touch points Recruitment Experience Delivery Leverage Mobile Source: Monitor analysis Information functional group The information initiatives allow for dissemination or capturing of information before and during the World Cup:  Information functional group The information initiatives allow for dissemination or capturing of information before and during the World Cup Product Database Product Owners National Content Management Platform Consumer Cities / Provinces SAT surveys Channels Develop a robust database of available products Web Call centre Trade partners Promotions through FIFA sponsors Information centres Volunteers Other consumer touch points Recruitment Delivery Leverage Create interface to enable transaction booking Create a 2010 national tourism volunteer program Research WC demand to better understand profile, perceptions and expectations Create a national content management platform Mobile Scale-up SAT call-centre Identify and utilise opportunities to capture information about 2010 arrivals Source: Monitor analysis Marketing and branding functional group Use the event to market and brand South Africa as a world-class tourism destination:  Marketing and branding functional group Use the event to market and brand South Africa as a world-class tourism destination Develop Branding Content Leverage media exposure Develop products and packages Leverage arrivals Identify key events in the run-up to and during 2010 2006 closing ceremony, Confederations cup, Match draws, ticket sales, African Cup, 2010 events etc Collaborate with FIFA and 2010 sponsors Comply with FIFA marketing and branding guidelines Create positive energy around the event to market to regional and domestic participants Develop products and packages to cross-sell and up-sell during the event Develop a campaign to minimise the impact of displacement before and after the event Develop data-driven content based on specific barriers identified in brand tracking study within 2010 target markets to: Raise unaided awareness Reduce drop-off between awareness and positivity Engage with key stakeholders in SA and neighbouring countries to package products Source: Monitor analysis Ensure arrivals are converted to brand ambassadors with a focus on VIPs Ensure high levels of satisfaction through: Diverse product offering Appropriate pricing Addressing market specific barriers (e.g. safety concerns, health concerns etc.) Deliver the brand to convert arrivals to brand ambassadors Identify 2010-related opportunities to brand South Africa as a world-class tourism destination Manage Displacement Accommodation functional group The provision of accommodation is a significant challenge for 2010:  KEY Note: * Data quality issue, need to reassess supply to ensure appropriate rating Source: Host City Interviews, 2010 comparative city analysis, Monitor Analysis Accommodation functional group The provision of accommodation is a significant challenge for 2010 Accommodation functional group Initiatives are required to address the volume, quality and pricing challenges in the accommodation offering:  Accommodation functional group Initiatives are required to address the volume, quality and pricing challenges in the accommodation offering Illustrative breakdown of accommodation supply for 2010 Develop a robust database of available products Increase the number of graded establishments Identify alternative accommodation for short-term spikes in demand Illustrative Source: Monitor analysis Accommodation functional group The volume challenge should be addressed by managing both demand and supply:  Accommodation functional group The volume challenge should be addressed by managing both demand and supply Transport and Safety & Security functional groups Tourism industry should ensure provision of tourism friendly transport to key attractions and ensure safety of tourists at the attractions:  Transport and Safety & Security functional groups Tourism industry should ensure provision of tourism friendly transport to key attractions and ensure safety of tourists at the attractions Allocation of responsibility for transport and safety & security Transportation – Tourism Industry Objectives Safety & Security – Tourism Industry Objectives Ensure transportation to tourism attractions by lobbying: Private sector to deploy tour buses along tourism routes Transport departments to ensure flexible commuter transport schedules and safe services; and for transport departments to engage with the business community to manage normal commuter demand (through flexible working hours etc.) Engage DoT to review regulations around tourism transport services specifically: Licensing of tour operators Route-based permits Ensure safety at attractions through dedicated tourism safety monitors (e.g. as part of volunteer program) in collaboration with the safety and security services Address negative perceptions Market SAT call centre as one-stop service with access to emergency response services Implementation of a national tourism safety plan Ensure sufficient public transportation to attractions Service levels and skills functional group In addition to a welcome campaign, skills and service levels must be improved at key consumer touch points:  Service levels and skills functional group In addition to a welcome campaign, skills and service levels must be improved at key consumer touch points South African Public Note: Gaps as identified in the GCP Skills Review Other Important Players Outside Tourism Address poor service levels and skills shortages at key consumer touch points Action Steps Per Group Tourism industry Continue to address the systemic challenges around skills and training Address specific gaps raised in interactions with host cities i.e. language training and service standards Implement a focused training campaign on hosting and service Other important players: Engage with key consumer touch points to address poor service levels Implement a focused training campaign on hosting and service (e.g. SA Host) General public Roll out the welcome campaign to create friendly, welcoming and helpful hosts Tourism Industry Service levels and skills functional group Key consumer touch points* that need to be focused on in terms of service levels range from pre-entry to exit:  Service levels and skills functional group Key consumer touch points* that need to be focused on in terms of service levels range from pre-entry to exit Note: This is not a comprehensive list Events and Attractions functional group Events and attractions for the 2010 World Cup must be coordinated centrally but organised at a host city level:  Events and Attractions functional group Events and attractions for the 2010 World Cup must be coordinated centrally but organised at a host city level Events Attractions Host cities have primary responsibility as events are organised at local level, SAT primarily has input rights DEAT and SAT should focus on facilitating planning and coordination of events to: Ensure that events occur in the run-up to and in 2010 Ensure alignment to SAT’s brand and 2010 branding Coordinate across host cities to ensure consistency and avoid duplication Share consumer insights to facilitate choice of events The event diary and attractions need to be upgraded to broaden the experience of visitors to South Africa DEAT and SAT should support the host cities, public sector organisations and the private sector in determining the need for product development and upgrading by: Ensuring the existence of attractions to broaden the experience Ensuring the quality and timely upgrading of attractions Optimizing the geographical spread Supporting product and service innovation through knowledge of key consumers Coordinate event planning to maximise tourism value from the event Coordinate development and upgrading of attractions Develop a robust database of available products Research WC demand to better understand profile, perceptions and expectations Agenda:  Agenda Context and objectives of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan Overview of the 2010 Soccer World Cup opportunity Key challenges for tourism around 2010 Key tourism-related initiatives Making it happen A 2010 Tourism Unit should be established to ensure implementation of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan:  A 2010 Tourism Unit should be established to ensure implementation of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan Developing a detailed operational plan Allocating the budget and resources across initiatives Developing metrics and monitoring implementation Ensuring alignment with the broader tourism growth strategy and LOC/TCC programme Coordination with existing line functions Initiatives will be focussed on three specific areas: Marketing and branding Demand-side research Supply-side research and implementation initiatives Co-ordination with the LOC Facilitate national government departments and TCC interactions Facilitate provincial and local government interactions Engagement of the tourism private sector Build relationships with the host cities Terms of reference for the 2010 Unit Potential Structure of the Tourism 2010 Unit:  Potential Structure of the Tourism 2010 Unit Ultimate accountability and responsibility will rest with one person Temporary structure that would cease after the event Initially staffed with: Head of unit 1 to 2 senior project managers 3 to 4 initiative managers Administrative staff To serve as a guiding coalition to help drive the competitiveness agenda through 2010 To be chaired by DEAT The resourcing of the unit and specific 2010 marketing and branding spend are not yet budgeted for Execution through existing SAT line function Additional capacity will be required within SAT’s current line functions Prioritisation of the initiatives will inform resource allocation decisions:  Prioritisation of the initiatives will inform resource allocation decisions Importance Barriers to Implementation For each initiative, a relative ranking must be determined based on barriers to implementation versus importance Slide75:  Source: Monitor Analysis All initiatives prioritised by barriers to implementation and relative importance Barriers to Implementation Relative Importance High Low High Low Prioritisation of the initiatives will inform resource allocation decisions (3) Transaction Interface (12) Research Demand (15) Capitalise on Arrivals (13) Call Centre (14) Volunteer Program (16,18) Branding Opportunities (2) Content Management Platform (1) Packaging (5) Grading of Establishments (17) Product Database (9) Skills & Service Level (8) Safety Plan (10,11) Events (6) Alternative Accommodation (7) Public Transportation (4) Displacement Summary Proposed Timeline (1 of 2):  Summary Proposed Timeline (1 of 2) Summary Proposed Timeline (2 of 2):  Summary Proposed Timeline (2 of 2) The goals of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan should be measured to track performance:  The goals of the 2010 Tourism Organising Plan should be measured to track performance * Includes performance and personality associations Source: SAT Brand Tracking Reports, Global Competitiveness Project; Monitor analysis Immediate next steps:  Immediate next steps Obtain buy-in and sign-off from the Minister Set-up the 2010 unit Develop detailed operational plans Develop a budget estimate for the unit and implementation of the initiatives Appendices:  Appendices Proposed high-level initiative action plans Detailed demand analysis Detail host city supply analysis FIFA rules and best practice analysis Sources Grouping the initiatives into specific functional areas will facilitate the implementation process:  Grouping the initiatives into specific functional areas will facilitate the implementation process Create a national content management platform Create interface to enable transaction booking Research WC demand to better understand profile, perceptions and expectations Scale-up SAT call-centre Create a 2010 national tourism volunteer program Identify and utilise opportunities to capture information about 2010 arrivals Develop a robust database of available products Engage with key stakeholders in SA and neighbouring countries to package products for 2010 and to manage displacement Deliver the brand to convert arrivals to brand ambassadors Identify 2010-related opportunities to brand South Africa as a world-class tourism destination Manage displacement Increase the number of graded establishments Identify existing and alternative accommodation for short-term spikes in demand Ensure sufficient tourism-friendly public transportation to tourism focal points Ensure completion & implementation of a national tourism safety plan Address poor service levels and skills shortages at key consumer touch points Coordinate event planning to maximise tourism value from the event Coordinate development and upgrading of attractions Requires coordination Accommodation Transport & Safety Skills & Service Levels Marketing & Branding Information Events & Attractions 1. 2. 3. 12. 13. 14. 15. 17.. 16. 18. 5. 6. 10. 11. 9. 7. 8. 4. Summary Proposed Timeline (1 of 2):  Summary Proposed Timeline (1 of 2) Summary Proposed Timeline (2 of 2):  Summary Proposed Timeline (2 of 2) Grouping the initiatives into specific functional areas will facilitate the implementation process:  Grouping the initiatives into specific functional areas will facilitate the implementation process Create a national content management platform Create interface to enable transaction booking Research WC demand to better understand profile, perceptions and expectations Scale-up SAT call-centre Create a 2010 national tourism volunteer program Identify and utilise opportunities to capture information about 2010 arrivals Develop a robust database of available products Engage with key stakeholders in SA and neighbouring countries to package products for 2010 and to manage displacement Deliver the brand to convert arrivals to brand ambassadors Identify 2010-related opportunities to brand South Africa as a world-class tourism destination Manage displacement Increase the number of graded establishments Identify existing and alternative accommodation for short-term spikes in demand Ensure sufficient tourism-friendly public transportation to tourism focal points Ensure completion & implementation of a national tourism safety plan Address poor service levels and skills shortages at key consumer touch points Coordinate event planning to maximise tourism value from the event Coordinate development and upgrading of attractions Requires coordination Accommodation Transport & Safety Skills & Service Levels Marketing & Branding Information Events & Attractions 1. 2. 3. 12. 13. 14. 15. 17.. 16. 18. 5. 6. 10. 11. 9. 7. 8. 4. Initiatives 2, 15 and 17 – Kick-off document Create a national content management platform: Overview:  Initiatives 2, 15 and 17 – Kick-off document Create a national content management platform: Overview Overall objective Sub – objectives of the initiative SAT has already embarked on a programme to develop and upgrade its information platform however, this needs to be expanded for 2010 SAT’s long-term goals 2010 specific goals Key action steps Potential challenges SAT Responsible Initiatives 2, 15 and 17 – Kick-off document Create a national content management platform: Team structure:  Initiatives 2, 15 and 17 – Kick-off document Create a national content management platform: Team structure SAT Responsible Initiative 3 – Kick-off document There is a need for an on-line transactional interface for independent travelers…:  Initiative 3 – Kick-off document There is a need for an on-line transactional interface for independent travelers… The majority of travelers are independent who mainly book discrete products (such as accommodation) through their travel agents or directly with providers Package usage for this trip to South Africa, 2004 % of Segment Full package – airfare accommodation, coach tours and food all included Package – airfare and accommodation and food all included Inclusive Package – airfare and accommodation included Independent – Booked airfare; accommodation, coach tours and food each separately Source: SAT Departure Survey 2004 SAT Responsible Initiative 3 – Kick-off document …especially those who use alternative accommodation :  Initiative 3 – Kick-off document …especially those who use alternative accommodation Note: Alternative accommodation is all accommodation except hotels and game lodges Source: SAT Departure Survey 2004 Percentage of visitors spending at least one night in alternative accommodation, 2004 Alternative accommodation is widely used by all arrivals especially land arrivals and European tourists SAT Responsible Initiative 3 – Kick-off document The on-line transactional interface will facilitate access to alternative establishments which are currently very fragmented:  Initiative 3 – Kick-off document The on-line transactional interface will facilitate access to alternative establishments which are currently very fragmented SAT Responsible These estimates derive from various sources and are seen to be fairly conservative. Note: Majority of alternative accommodation estimates are based on multiple sources and are deemed to be on the conservative side, *Backpackers are estimated at 5,000 rooms based on a bed capacity of 10,000 Source: GCP Analysis, JICA, AA Travel, BTSA, SANParks, BABASA, StatsSA Total Room Capacity Available in South Africa by Accommodation Type 2004 Room capacity available Initiative 3 – Kick-off document A possible scenario for such an interface:  Initiative 3 – Kick-off document A possible scenario for such an interface SAT Responsible TGCSA Accommodation Database MATCH Booking Platform SAT Product Database SAT Content Management Platform Channels (i.e. website, call centre) Consumer Note: Existing booking platforms such as Western Cape’s should co-exist with the TGCSA / MATCH engine using the same content management platform Other Accommodation A private outsourcing partner could take over operation of the booking platform post 2010 Potential TGCSA and MATCH transactional relationship SAT Need for coordination TGCSA / MATCH and SAT’s current plans need to be interlinked to ensure a seamless information gathering and booking process Initiative 3 – Kick-off document Create interface to enable transaction booking: Overview:  Initiative 3 – Kick-off document Create interface to enable transaction booking: Overview Overall objective Sub – objectives of the initiative 2010 specific goals Long-term goals Key action steps Potential challenges Note: * No partner should have more than 49% of shares to ensure collaboration of all players in the industry; Could consider providing ownership of the platform to tourism product owners SAT Responsible Initiative 3 – Kick-off document Create interface to enable transaction booking: Team structure:  Initiative 3 – Kick-off document Create interface to enable transaction booking: Team structure DEAT / SAT Responsible Initiative 12 – Kick-off document Research is required to better understand who is likely to come to the World Cup as well as the needs and expectations of these arrivals:  Initiative 12 – Kick-off document Research is required to better understand who is likely to come to the World Cup as well as the needs and expectations of these arrivals High-level profile of sports tourists and soccer fans Implications for SAT *Ticket prices in Japan / Korea ranged from US$60 to US$750 depending on the type of match (i.e. preliminaries, final etc) Source: SAT Departure Survey, Domestic Tourism Survey, Interviews with LOC and MATCH, Monitor Analysis SAT Responsible Initiative 12 – Kick-off document Research WC demand: Overview:  Initiative 12 – Kick-off document Research WC demand: Overview Overall objective Sub – objectives of the initiative The available data does not provide insight into the expectations of World Cup tourists Key action steps Potential challenges SAT Responsible Initiative 12 – Kick-off document Research WC demand: Team structure:  Initiative 12 – Kick-off document Research WC demand: Team structure SAT Responsible Initiative 13 – Kick-off document Scale-up SAT call-centre: Overview:  Initiative 13 – Kick-off document Scale-up SAT call-centre: Overview Overall objective Sub – objectives of the initiative SAT’s call centre should be equipped to handle emergency calls from tourists Key action steps Potential challenges SAT Responsible Initiative 13 – Kick-off document Scale-up SAT call-centre : Team structure:  Initiative 13 – Kick-off document Scale-up SAT call-centre : Team structure SAT Responsible Initiative 14 – Kick-off document Create a 2010 national tourism volunteer program: Overview:  Initiative 14 – Kick-off document Create a 2010 national tourism volunteer program: Overview Overall objective Sub – objectives of the initiative Key action steps Potential challenges DEAT / SAT Responsible Initiative 14 – Kick-off document Create a 2010 national tourism volunteer program: Team structure:  Initiative 14 – Kick-off document Create a 2010 national tourism volunteer program: Team structure DEAT / SAT Responsible Marketing & Branding functional group:  Marketing & Branding functional group Create a national content management platform Create interface to enable transaction booking Research WC demand to better understand profile, perceptions and expectations Scale-up SAT call-centre Create a 2010 national tourism volunteer program Identify and utilise opportunities to capture information about 2010 arrivals Develop a robust database of available products Engage with key stakeholders in SA and neighbouring countries to package products for 2010 and to manage displacement Deliver the brand to convert arrivals to brand ambassadors Identify 2010-related opportunities to brand South Africa as a world-class tourism destination Manage displacement Increase the number of graded establishments Identify existing and alternative accommodation for short-term spikes in demand Ensure sufficient tourism-friendly public transportation to tourism focal points Ensure completion & implementation of a national tourism safety pla

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