20061130 woodling

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Published on December 30, 2007

Author: Mahugani

Source: authorstream.com

Regionalism in Water Resources Management:  Regionalism in Water Resources Management John K. Woodling California Department of Water Resources Blueprint Learning Network November 30, 2006 California Water Systems:  California Water Systems California Water Systems:  California Water Systems Water Management Transitions:  Water Management Transitions Era of Conflict California Water Plan:  California Water Plan Key Initiatives: Integrated Regional Water Management Statewide Water Management Scenario Demand Changes by Region (by Year 2030) :  Scenario Demand Changes by Region (by Year 2030) Resource Management Strategies:  Reduce Water Demand Agricultural Water Use Efficiency Urban Water Use Efficiency Improve Operational Efficiency & Transfers Conveyance System Reoperation Water Transfers Increase Water Supply Conjunctive Management & Groundwater Storage Desalination –Brackish & Seawater Precipitation Enhancement Recycled Municipal Water Surface Storage – CALFED Surface Storage - Regional/Local Improve Water Quality Drinking Water Treatment and Distribution Groundwater/Aquifer Remediation Matching Quality to Use Pollution Prevention Urban Runoff Management Practice Resource Stewardship Agricultural Lands Stewardship Economic Incentives (Loans, Grants, and Water Pricing) Ecosystem Restoration Floodplain Management Recharge Areas Protection Urban Land Use Management Water-Dependent Recreation Watershed Management Resource Management Strategies Range of Additional Water for Eight Resource Management Choices:  Range of Additional Water for Eight Resource Management Choices Integrated Regional Water Management:  Integrated Regional Water Management Why IRWM? Water management actions and issues are interconnected Issues don’t obey political boundaries A variety of entities are responsible for different actions IRWM promotes a sustainable, efficient approach to water management by bringing together interests, issues, and solutions Integrated Regional Water Management:  Integrated Regional Water Management Integration Considerations Water quality and quantity Demand management and supply enhancement All beneficial water uses Upstream, downstream, and instream effects Land use, energy, and other resources Broad societal costs and benefits Integrated Regional Water Management:  Integrated Regional Water Management Participants Water purveyors Wastewater agencies Flood control agencies Cities & counties Native American tribes Self-supplied water users Stakeholder organizations Industry Environmental Community State, federal, and regional agencies or universities Implementation:  Implementation Proposition 50 - $500 million for IRWM grants Proposition 84 - $1 billion for IRWM grants Local cost shares of 60-90% Slide13:  33 Awards $500K to 1.5 million Planning Grants Slide14:  16 proposals Requesting $380 million Total costs $2 billion 7 recommended for funding $25 million grants Implementation Grants

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