0861822 Caribana Madness

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Information about 0861822 Caribana Madness

Published on October 13, 2008

Author: lambj

Source: slideshare.net

Description

This slide show is about the Caribana festival . Its begins with a brief description and history of what Caribana is and what it means to the Caribbean people that celebrate it. It also talks about what the newer traditions that now have become a staple in the events leading up to the finale, the parade and who attends how it keeps the onlookers coming back every year.

 

What is Caribana? Caribana is a large festival that represents the West Indian culture. Caribana has run annually since 1967, and it is held in Toronto, Ontario during the summer. It was adapted from a festival held in Trinidad and Tobago called Carnival. Basically, a mass of people joining together and enjoying the West Indian culture, song and dance. Each year it averages 1.3 million visitors and contributes approximately $300 million to the Canadian economy.

Caribana is a large festival that represents the West Indian culture. Caribana has run annually since 1967, and it is held in Toronto, Ontario during the summer. It was adapted from a festival held in Trinidad and Tobago called Carnival. Basically, a mass of people joining together and enjoying the West Indian culture, song and dance. Each year it averages 1.3 million visitors and contributes approximately $300 million to the Canadian economy.

C aribana has run annually since 1967, in previous years the main Caribana events have been run by a non-profit Toronto-based organization named the Caribbean Cultural Committee (CCC). In 2006 the Caribbean Cultural Committee ran into financial troubles and due to lack of financial accountability it was financially cut off from the City of Toronto. Due to the financial problems the festival had to temporarily change the name to the Toronto Caribbean Carnival (Caribana) Festival.

C aribana has run annually since 1967, in previous years the main Caribana events have been run by a non-profit Toronto-based organization named the Caribbean Cultural Committee (CCC). In 2006 the Caribbean Cultural Committee ran into financial troubles and due to lack of financial accountability it was financially cut off from the City of Toronto. Due to the financial problems the festival had to temporarily change the name to the Toronto Caribbean Carnival (Caribana) Festival.

Attendance at Caribana 2008 43% 57% Female Male

Canadian and International Vistors

Anyone is able to participate, young and old. However if being a masquerader is what you want to do getting started on your costumes needs to begin once the previous festival finishes. Costumes take many months to create and build.

Anyone is able to participate, young and old. However if being a masquerader is what you want to do getting started on your costumes needs to begin once the previous festival finishes. Costumes take many months to create and build.

 

 

Music is an important part of Caribbean culture. When you are watching the parade you can hear the excitement of calypso, steel pan and elaborate masquerade costumes. There are thousands of costumed masqueraders and dozens of trucks carrying live soca, calypso, steel pan, and reggae that march the parade route all day.

Music is an important part of Caribbean culture. When you are watching the parade you can hear the excitement of calypso, steel pan and elaborate masquerade costumes. There are thousands of costumed masqueraders and dozens of trucks carrying live soca, calypso, steel pan, and reggae that march the parade route all day.

Citations Steel Pan: http://www.minnews.org/images/Caribana-Parade-steel-pan5.gif King: http://www.dancecaribe.com/DSC_0215.JPG Queen: http://www.caribanatoronto.com/CaribanaToronto/images/smallking2.jpg Graph 2 & 3: http://www.statcan.ca/bsolc/english/bsolc?catno=89-621-X2007007

Steel Pan: http://www.minnews.org/images/Caribana-Parade-steel-pan5.gif

King: http://www.dancecaribe.com/DSC_0215.JPG

Queen: http://www.caribanatoronto.com/CaribanaToronto/images/smallking2.jpg

Graph 2 & 3: http://www.statcan.ca/bsolc/english/bsolc?catno=89-621-X2007007

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