05Mar14 - Missing 90 year olds

36 %
64 %
Information about 05Mar14 - Missing 90 year olds
News & Politics

Published on March 7, 2014

Author: ILC-UK

Source: slideshare.net

Description

During 2014, ILC-UK, supported by specialist insurance company, Partnership Assurance Group plc (Partnership), is undertaking a series of events to explore the relationship between our changing demography and public policy.

The second event in the series will explore how much we really know about life expectancy at the highest ages. How many of us are living to 90 and beyond? Why have estimates of life expectancy required revision? What does this tell us about increasing longevity? And what does this trend mean for public policy and long-term population planning?

Missing 90 year olds An ILC-UK debate supported by Partnership as part of the Population Patterns Series Wednesday 5th March 2014 This event is kindly supported by Partnership #missing90s #populationpatterns

Baroness Sally Greengross Chief Executive ILC-UK This event is kindly supported by Partnership #missing90s #populationpatterns

Richard Willets Director of Longevity Partnership This event is kindly supported by Partnership #missing90s #populationpatterns

‘Missing’ 90 year olds An Introduction Richard Willets International Longevity Centre – 5 March 2014

Introduction • Population estimates for England & Wales based on the 2011 Census were published in July 2012 • Prior to this our population estimates were based on the 2001 Census with adjustments made to allow for subsequent migration and deaths • Source: Wall Street Journal March 14 5

Impact of the 2011 Census on population estimates 6 Revision to England & Wales population estimates for mid-year 2011 following 2011 Census, by age 5% Females 0% 40-44 45-49 50-54 -5% -10% -15% -20% • Source: own calculations using ONS data March 14 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+

Impact of the 2011 Census on population estimates 7 Revision to England & Wales population estimates for mid-year 2011 following 2011 Census, by age 5% Females Males 0% 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ -5% -10% -15% -20% • Source: own calculations using ONS data March 14 Approx 30,000 fewer individuals

More significant revisions in the US • In 2004 the US Census Bureau projected there would be:• • 114,000 Americans aged 100 plus in 2010 1.1 million centenarians in 2050 • Following the 2010 Census, figures revised to:• • • 53,364 Americans aged 100 plus in 2010 0.59 million centenarians in 2050 Source: Wall Street Journal March 14 8

Impact on apparent mortality improvement rates Average annual rate of mortality improvement, males in England & Wales, 2001-2011, by age group, before and after publication of the 2011 Census results 2010-based 3.0% 2.5% 2.0% 1.5% 1.0% 0.5% 0.0% 80-84 • Source: own calculations using ONS data March 14 85-89 90-94 95-99 9

Impact on apparent mortality improvement rates Average annual rate of mortality improvement, males in England & Wales, 2001-2011, by age group, before and after publication of the 2011 Census results 2010-based 3.0% revised 2.5% 2.0% 1.5% 1.0% 0.5% 0.0% 80-84 • Source: own calculations using ONS data March 14 85-89 90-94 95-99 10

Impact on apparent mortality improvement rates Average annual rate of mortality improvement, males in England & Wales, 2001-2011, by age group, before and after publication of the 2011 Census results 2010-based 3.0% revised 2001 to 2013 2.5% 2.0% 1.5% 1.0% 0.5% 0.0% 80-84 • Source: own calculations using ONS data March 14 85-89 90-94 95-99 11

Impact on projected mortality rates 12 0.40 Average mortality rate for males in the 90-99 age range, England & Wales, actual and projected figures Actual Simple extrapolation 0.35 0.30 0.25 0.20 0.15 0.10 0.05 0.00 1990 • Source: own calculations using ONS data March 14 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030

Impact on projected mortality rates 13 0.40 Average mortality rate for males in the 90-99 age range, England & Wales, actual and projected figures Actual 0.35 Simple extrapolation 2010-based projection 0.30 +50% 0.25 0.20 0.15 0.10 0.05 0.00 1990 • Source: own calculations using ONS data March 14 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030

Consequences 14 • Greater appreciation of the challenges in producing accurate data for the highest age groups • Small but material reductions in the projected lifespans of pensioners/annuitants • Significant revisions in the projected number of elderly individuals The ONS publication “What are the chances of reaching age 100?” published in Spring 2012 projected that 9.5% (37,000) of men aged 65 in the UK in 2012 would reach age 100* The equivalent publication in 2013 had a principal projection of 8% (31,000) of men aged 65 in 2013 reaching age 100* Arguably, a more realistic survival probability could be 5-6%** • Raises more fundamental questions (e.g. why is rate of mortality improvement so much lower at high ages?) • *Source: ONS March 14 • **Source: own calculation

Thank you Partnership is a trading style of the Partnership group of Companies, which includes; Partnership Life Assurance Company Limited (registered in England and Wales No. 05465261), and Partnership Home Loans Limited (registered in England and Wales No. 05108846). Partnership Life Assurance Company Limited is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. Partnership Home Loans Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. The registered office for both companies is Sackville House, 143-149 Fenchurch Street, London EC3M 6BN. March 14 15

Dave Grimshaw FIA Partner Barnett Waddingham LLP This event is kindly supported by Partnership #missing90s #populationpatterns

UK Actuarial Advisory Firm of the Year Understanding mortality at 90+ years ILC-UK Population Patterns Series event: ‘Missing 90 year olds’ Dave Grimshaw, Partner, Barnett Waddingham LLP dave.grimshaw@bwllp.co.uk 05 March 2014

BACKGROUND 18

Why are actuaries interested in mortality? Where a payment is contingent on survival • Valuing liabilities for pension schemes • Pricing and valuing insurance products: • Where a benefit is payable on death, and • Where a benefit is payable throughout life We are interested in current mortality and how it might change in future 19

Mortality rates and mortality improvements Mortality rate Deaths ÷ Exposure • Example: • Age 83 in 2005 9,227 ÷ 92,381 = 9.99% • Age 83 in 2006 8,779 ÷ 89,958 = 9.76% Mortality improvement • Percentage reduction in mortality rate compared to the same age one year earlier • Example: • Mortality reduction: 0.23% • Mortality improvement: 0.23% ÷ 9.99% = 2.3% 20

What data do actuaries use? • Specific portfolio • Data for the (pension scheme or insurance company) • Pooled studies • e.g. the CMI produces analyses of pension schemes and various insurance products • Population data 21

Why is population data useful? Preference for similar data i.e. the specific group of pensioners or insured lives but… • Pension schemes can be small and heterogeneous • CMI pensioners dataset is approximately 24% of the population for Males and only 8% for Females • Population data adds credibility, especially where data is sparse (e.g. oldest or youngest ages) • Insurance/pensioner data may be unreliable • Mortality tends to converge at older ages • Mortality improvements need especially large datasets 22

Unreliability of insured and pensioner data at older ages? 1.00 Mortality Rate (log m) S1PML PCML00 Low Gate Crude Rate 0.10 High Gate S1PML PCML00 0.01 65 75 85 95 105 65 Age 75 85 95 105 Comparison of observed experience with graduations Source: CMI Working Paper 35 (for S1PML) and CMI Report 23 (for PCML00). 23

Convergence of mortality rates at older ages? 200% % of mortality rate for all classes combined 180% I - Professional 160% II - Managerial 140% IIIN - Skilled non-manual 120% IIIM - Skilled manual 100% IV - Partly skilled 80% V - Unskilled 60% All classes combined 40% 20% 0% 40−44 45−49 50−54 55−59 60−64 65−69 70−74 75−79 80−84 85−89 90+ Age band Relative crude mortality rates by age band and socio-economic class for males in England and Wales, 1982-2005. Source: BW calculations using data from ONS Longitudinal Study 1982-2005 classified by RGSC 24

UNDERSTANDING POPULATION MORTALITY AT AGES 90+ 25

Change in population estimate (%) 2011 Census and E&W population estimates 10% Males Females 5% 0% -5% -10% -15% -20% Age Band 2011 Census count compared with roll-forward estimate Source: ONS supplemented by BW calculations for ages 90+; estimates as at mid-2011 26

Population estimates for older ages between Censuses • ONS use Census roll-forward method to estimate population at individual ages to age 89, plus a total for ages 90+ • Use Kannisto-Thatcher survivor ratio method to allocate 90+ total to individual ages • Extinct cohort method • Reconstruct population working back along cohort’s path, starting from last survivor and adding back deaths, assuming no migration • Non-extinct cohorts • Estimate current population using survivor ratio • Survivor ratio = Survivors ÷ deaths in cohort in last 5 years • Assume stability or predictability of survivor ratio across cohorts • Then work back along cohort’s path as above 27

Population estimates for older ages between Censuses • As ONS apply a constraint on the K-T method, the total 90+ estimates are determined by the rollforward method • These roll-forward estimates are highly sensitive at older ages to accuracy of initial estimate • 1% error in estimates for ages 80-89 results in: • 4% error for females at ages 90-99 at next census; and • 7% error for males at ages 90-99 at next census. 28

Population estimates for older ages – an alternative approach • ONS use Kannisto-Thatcher method to allocate 90+ total to individual ages (but 90+ total based on rollforward estimates) • But can also apply K-T methodology without constraint to 90+ total • Key assumptions: • Death registration data is accurate • No net migration • Survivor ratio is stable / predictable. 29

Alternative estimates compared with roll-forward estimate % reduction to the roll-forward estimate from the 2001 Census 0% -5% -10% -15% 2011 Census (M) -20% BW (M) 2011 Census (F) -25% BW (F) 80-84 85-89 90-94 Age Band 95-99 100+ Comparison of estimates of mid-2011 population for E&W Source: BW calculations using population estimates and death registrations data to 2011 published by ONS. 30

K-T estimate using 2012 deaths compared with roll-forward estimate 350,000 Females 300,000 250,000 200,000 ONS 150,000 Barnett Waddingham (K-T) 100,000 50,000 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 0 Comparison of estimates of female population for E&W Source: BW calculations using population estimates and death registrations data to 2012 published by ONS. 31

K-T estimate using 2012 deaths compared with roll-forward estimate 150,000 Males 120,000 90,000 ONS 60,000 Barnett Waddingham (K-T) 30,000 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 0 Comparison of estimates of male population for E&W Source: BW calculations using population estimates and death registrations data to 2012 published by ONS. 32

Summary • Census estimates at older ages appear reasonably accurate… • But some doubt regarding 2001 for males • Inter-Censal estimates may become less reliable, as any inaccuracy in the previous Census is amplified in the current approach 33

Regulatory Information • The information in this presentation is based on our understanding of current taxation law, proposed legislation and HM Revenue & Customs practice, which may be subject to future variation. • This presentation is not intended to provide and must not be construed as regulated investment advice. Returns are not guaranteed and the value of investments may go down as well as up. • Barnett Waddingham LLP is a limited liability partnership registered in England and Wales. Registered Number OC307678. Registered Office: Cheapside House, 138 Cheapside, London, EC2V 6BW • • • 34 Barnett Waddingham LLP is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and is licensed by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries for a range of investment business activities.

Angele Storey Demographic Analysis Unit ONS This event is kindly supported by Partnership #missing90s #populationpatterns

How accurate are official high age population estimates? Angele Storey, Demographic Analysis Unit, Population Statistics Division, Office for National Statistics

Official high age estimates • Annual mid-year population estimates by single year of age and sex up to age 89 and 90 and over population - component cohort method • Life tables and population projections require population estimates at single year of age for the 90 and over population - Kannisto-Thatcher method (form of survivor ratio methodology) .

Kannisto -Thatcher method • Age at death data is used to build profiles of the distribution of older people in back years • Average of the last 5 years ‘age at death’ data for each cohort is used to produce an estimate of the number of survivors for the current year. • KT estimates constrained to the official 90+ total in final stage of the method • Back years are recalculated annually as more recent deaths data becomes available

KT 90+ totals as percentage of official MYE 90+ totals 105 Sum of deaths 100 95 90 85 80 75 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 Males Females

1991, 2001 and 2012 based KT 90+ totals as a percentage of official 90+ totals - Males 100 98 96 94 92 90 88 86 84 82 80 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2012 based KT estimates 2001 based KT estimates 1991 based KT estimates

1991, 2001 and 2012 based KT 90+ totals as a percentage of official 90+ totals - Females 105 100 95 90 85 80 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2012 based KT estimates 2001 based KT estimates 1991 based KT estimates

Comparison of 90+ totals across data sources - Males 130,000 120,000 110,000 100,000 90,000 80,000 70,000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 90+ on Patient Register DWP 90+ claimants Official 90+ MYE 90+ KT estimate (unconstrained) 2012

Comparison of 90+ totals across data sources - Females 360,000 340,000 320,000 300,000 280,000 260,000 240,000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 90+ on Patient Register DWP 90+ Claimants Official 90+ MYE 90+ KT estimate (unconstrained) 2012

Possible sources of error in data sources • Census estimates: - D.o.b. exaggeration and mis-reporting - Proxy responses - Some incorrect recording of year of birth / processing issues • Inter-censal estimates: (Annual Mid-Year Estimates) - Any errors in 90+ age group at Census are rolled forward - Any over-count in those in their 80s comprises a larger proportion as these non-existent people are aged on • Patient Register and DWP claimants - People not removed / time lag in removing? - People not on registers -

KT method assumptions 1) Deaths data is accurate and complete - No validation of d.o.b on death certificate - Occurrences recorded in the correct year but those not captured at time are not added back - Registrations capture all deaths but not necessarily in correct year 2) No migration at oldest ages - Internal to E & W (around 2.1% of people aged 90+ in 2005) - international migration – in and out flows too small to measure

What would be the impact of lower estimates of the very old on life expectancy? 2012 BASED MALES KT estimates constrained to official 90+ total KT estimates KT estimates constrained to unconstrained 92% of official 90+ total Life expectancy at age 0 79.2 79.2 79.1 Life expectancy at age 65 18.4 18.4 18.3 Life expectancy at age 90 4.0 3.8 3.5

What would be the impact of lower estimates of the very old on life expectancy? 2012 BASED FEMALES KT estimates constrained to official 90+ total KT estimates KT estimates constrained to unconstrained 95% of official 90+ total Life expectancy at age 0 82.9 82.8 82.7 Life expectancy at age 65 20.9 20.8 20.7 Life expectancy at age 90 4.7 4.5 4.1

Review of 90+ totals and age distributions • Investigate effects of ‘tweaking the method’ - optimum survivor ratios; death registrations v. death occurrences; calendar year to mid-year • Investigate effect of no allowance being made for improvements to the mortality rate in KT method • Produce UK set of 90+ estimates on basis of combined constituent countries deaths data (to eliminate any internal migration factor) • Assess optimum age to ‘join’ KT estimates to official 90+ estimates

Review of 90+ totals and age distributions cont…. • Investigate extent of inaccuracies in reporting of d.o.b. in the Census , - validate a sample of 90+ deaths by matching to birth certificates - use ONS LS to trace those aged 90 to 115 back thorough the 5 available Censuses - quantify imputation rates at oldest ages • Detailed investigation of comparative data sources- age distributions • Discussion – Your ideas – what else could we do?

For further information… For information or queries on….. - population ageing, contact: ageing@ons.gov.uk - national life expectancy, contact: lifetables@ons.gov.uk; - sub-national life expectancy ,contact: - population projections ,contact: - 2011 Census, contact: mortality@ons.gov.uk projections@ons.gov.uk Census.customerservices@ons.gov.uk

David Sinclair Assistant Director, Policy and Communications ILC-UK This event is kindly supported by Partnership #missing90s #populationpatterns

The oldest old David Sinclair, International Longevity Centre – UK @ilcuk @sinclairda The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

 Life is pretty tough. (frailty/isolation/health/income)  Dependency is not inevitable  Irrespective on the exact numbers. There will be more.  We don’t actually know a lot about the oldest old.  Today’s oldest old are not necessarily representative of tomorrows (genetics/environment/poor health = withdrawal from longitudinal studies) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Life is not easy for the oldest old  Three quarters of the oldest old suffer from limiting longstanding illnesses, and one out of three perceive themselves as being in poor health. (Tomassini C, 2005)  “almost 50% of men and women http://www.flickr.com/photos/pondspider/4170 990903/sizes/m/in/photostream/ aged 80-84 report severe limitations in activities” (IFS, 2010) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Falls  60% of interviewees aged over 90 had had a fall and that of these, 4 in five were unable to get up after at least one fall and almost a third had lain on the ground for an hour or more.  Call alarms were widely available but not used.(Fleming and Brayne, 2008; Cambridge City over 75-Cohor. BMJ) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

And many find it difficult to do day to day tasks Sixty per-cent of over 90s report difficulties shopping for groceries, almost a quarter report difficulties making telephone calls and 35% report http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinkcho colate/3039589789/sizes/m/in/photos tream/ difficulties managing money. (Sinclair, 2010/ELSA) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

A relatively high proportion live alone Of those living in private households, four in ten very old men and seven out of ten very old women live alone. One out of five very old people live in communal establishments. (Tomassini C, 2005). http://www.flickr.com/photos/sbeebe/51541697 95/sizes/m/in/photostream/ The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Living together is good for us  Those who moved from living alone to living as part of a couple (with no children) exhibited a 68% fall in the odds of becoming multiply excluded between 2002 and 2008 compared to those who stayed living alone;  Those who moved from being resident in a couple household to living alone were over three times more likely to become multiply excluded. For this age group (50+), becoming a widow is one of the most common reasons for starting to live alone. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. http://www.flickr.co m/photos/anabadili/ 2963913137/sizes/ m/in/photostream/

The oldest old remain the most excluded  Almost 38% of those aged 85 or older faced some kind of social exclusion, an encouraging decline of 10% from the 2002 levels  As people age, they are more likely to become more socially excluded than less http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinkcho colate/3039589789/sizes/m/in/photos tream/  Almost two-fifths (38%) of those aged 85 and older were excluded from two or more domains of exclusion in 2008 The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Quality of Life falls with age The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Depression  “23% of those aged 85 and over had levels of depressive symptoms indicative of clinical relevance”  “Almost 13% of men and women aged 80 and over had high levels of depressive symptoms in 2008-09 but not in 2002-03” (IFS, 2010) ELSA http://www.flickr.com/photos/junglearctic/ 3002442666/sizes/m/in/photostream/ The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Most centenarians consult their GP 98% of centenarians and near centenarians consulted a GP and received prescription medicine during follow up. (Roughead, Kalisch et al, 2010) http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwjensen/2288339230/sizes/m/in/photostre am/ The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Centenarians do use drugs heavily A study of 602 centenarians in Italy found that a very high proportion of this age group were users of drugs.      5% no drugs. 13% one drug a day 16% took 2 drugs per day 65% took three drugs a day 5.5% more than 3 drugs a day. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Some evidence of longer hospital stays Centenarians who had suffered from a hip fracture between 2000 and 2007 compared to a randomly selected control group of 50 hip fracture patients aged between 75 and 85. “the mean stay in acute orthopaedic wards for centenarians was 20.7 days and for the control group was 14.9 days”. The longer acute hospital stay in the centenarian cohort would amount to a mean extra cost of £ 2511 per patient. (Verma et al) The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Dementia among centenarians The prevalence of dementia-free survival past 100 years of age varied between 0 and 50 percent. http://www.flickr.com/photos/thousandshipz/4679235/sizes/m/in/photostream/ The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Poverty is a very real challenge  There is evidence that the oldest old (aged 85 and over) are, as a group, at greater risk of poverty than younger older people (aged 65-85)  Up to 10% of the oldest old have total net wealth of £3,000 or less. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Britons ageing quicker than their parents The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Dependency is not inevitable Dependency is not inevitable and a ”considerable proportion of the centenarians maintain a good level of auto sufficiency for the basic performance of the everyday life”. (Antonini et al, 2008) http://www.flickr.com/photos/driever/5525684658/si zes/m/in/photostream/ The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Some of the oldest old become more active The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

A move to prevention is vital  Prevention of ill health  Physical Activity  Smoking and alcohol consumption  Nutrition  Immunisation The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

We need to get housing right 1. Extra care housing is a home for life 2. Extra care translates into fewer falls 3. Extra care is associated with a lower uptake of inpatient hospital beds The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Many thanks David Sinclair Head of Policy and Research International Longevity Centre Davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk 02073400440 Twitter: @ilcuk and @sinclairda The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Andrew Latto Deputy Director, State Pensions Directorate Department for Work and Pensions This event is kindly supported by Partnership #missing90s #populationpatterns

Missing 90 year olds An ILC-UK debate supported by Partnership as part of the Population Patterns Series Wednesday 5th March 2014 This event is kindly supported by Partnership #missing90s #populationpatterns

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

International Longevity Centre - UK

INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE - UK, A think-tank impacting policy on longevity, ... 05Mar14 - Missing 90 year olds from ILC- UK. 2015. 2014. 2013. 2012 ...
Read more

Where are the missing 90-year-olds? - BBC News

Where are the missing 90-year-olds? By Ruth Alexander BBC News. 2 July 2013. ... The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.
Read more

Missing’ 90-year-olds

‘Missing’ 90-year-olds POPULATION PATTERNS Seminar Series seeing retirement differently ... ‘missing’ a number of people aged 90 and above.
Read more

Where are the missing 90-year-olds? - BBC News

Where are the missing 90-year-olds? By Ruth Alexander BBC News. 2 July 2013. From the section Magazine ...
Read more

Missing 90-year-old | Watch the video - Yahoo News

Missing 90-year-old Alicia Smith, Vic Faust, Keenan Smith, Erin Nicole. Now watching Paused Up next. 1:56 ...
Read more

Missing 90-year-old found safe | Watch the video - Yahoo News

Mose Powell Jr., a 90-year-old man who went missing for two days, returns to home safely
Read more

90-year-old missing man found safe | WDTN

90-year-old missing man found safe. By Kelley King Published: August 15, 2015, ... URBANA, Ohio (WDTN) — A missing 90-year-old man has been found safe.
Read more

Missing 90-year-old found safe - YouTube

Missing 90-year-old found safe ABC Action News. ... Mose Powell Jr., a 90-year-old man who went missing for two days, returns to home safely.
Read more

How a 90-Year-Old Missing Person Became a Hit on Spotify

How a 90-Year-Old Missing Person Became a Hit on Spotify. ... two years into her ... and he won an Oscar for the short film Munro-- about a 4-year-old who ...
Read more