04 thermodynamics

40 %
60 %
Information about 04 thermodynamics

Published on March 31, 2014

Author: nguyennha1211

Source: slideshare.net

Copyright © 2008, 1997, 1984, 1973, 1963, 1950, 1941, 1934 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Manufactured in the United States of America. Except as permitted under the United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher. 0-07-154211-6 The material in this eBook also appears in the print version of this title: 0-07-151127-X. All trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners. Rather than put a trademark symbol after every occurrence of a trademarked name, we use names in an editorial fashion only, and to the benefit of the trademark owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark. Where such desig- nations appear in this book, they have been printed with initial caps. McGraw-Hill eBooks are available at special quantity discounts to use as premiums and sales promotions, or for use in corporate training programs. For more information, please contact George Hoare, Special Sales, at george_hoare@mcgraw-hill.com or (212) 904-4069. TERMS OF USE This is a copyrighted work and The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. (“McGraw-Hill”) and its licensors reserve all rights in and to the work. Use of this work is subject to these terms. Except as permitted under the Copyright Act of 1976 and the right to store and retrieve one copy of the work, you may not decompile, disassemble, reverse engineer, reproduce, modify, create derivative works based upon, transmit, distribute, disseminate, sell, publish or sublicense the work or any part of it without McGraw-Hill’s prior consent. You may use the work for your own noncommercial and personal use; any other use of the work is strictly prohibited. Your right to use the work may be terminated if you fail to comply with these terms. THE WORK IS PROVIDED “AS IS.” McGRAW-HILL AND ITS LICENSORS MAKE NO GUARANTEES OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE ACCURACY, ADEQUACY OR COMPLETENESS OF OR RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED FROM USING THE WORK, INCLUDING ANY INFORMATION THAT CAN BE ACCESSED THROUGH THE WORK VIA HYPERLINK OR OTHERWISE, AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. McGraw-Hill and its licensors do not warrant or guarantee that the functions contained in the work will meet your requirements or that its operation will be uninterrupted or error free. Neither McGraw-Hill nor its licensors shall be liable to you or anyone else for any inaccuracy, error or omission, regardless of cause, in the work or for any damages resulting therefrom. McGraw-Hill has no responsibility for the content of any information accessed through the work. Under no circumstances shall McGraw-Hill and/or its licensors be liable for any indirect, incidental, special, punitive, consequential or similar damages that result from the use of or inability to use the work, even if any of them has been advised of the possibility of such damages. This limitation of liability shall apply to any claim or cause whatsoever whether such claim or cause arises in contract, tort or otherwise. DOI: 10.1036/007151127X

This page intentionally left blank

INTRODUCTION Postulate 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Postulate 2 (First Law of Thermodynamics) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Postulate 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Postulate 4 (Second Law of Thermodynamics). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Postulate 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 VARIABLES, DEFINITIONS, AND RELATIONSHIPS Constant-Composition Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 U, H, and S as Functions of T and P or T and V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 The Ideal Gas Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Residual Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FOR GASES AND VAPORS Evaluation of Enthalpy and Entropy in the Ideal Gas State . . . . . . . . . 4-8 Residual Enthalpy and Entropy from PVT Correlations . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 Virial Equations of State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 Cubic Equations of State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 Pitzer’s Generalized Correlations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12 OTHER PROPERTY FORMULATIONS Liquid Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13 Liquid/Vapor Phase Transition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13 THERMODYNAMICS OF FLOW PROCESSES Mass, Energy, and Entropy Balances for Open Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 Mass Balance for Open Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 General Energy Balance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 Energy Balances for Steady-State Flow Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 Entropy Balance for Open Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 Summary of Equations of Balance for Open Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15 Applications to Flow Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15 Duct Flow of Compressible Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15 Pipe Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15 Nozzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15 Throttling Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16 Turbines (Expanders) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16 Compression Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16 Example 1: LNG Vaporization and Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17 SYSTEMS OF VARIABLE COMPOSITION Partial Molar Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17 Gibbs-Duhem Equation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18 Partial Molar Equation-of-State Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18 Partial Molar Gibbs Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19 Solution Thermodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19 Ideal Gas Mixture Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19 Fugacity and Fugacity Coefficient. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19 Evaluation of Fugacity Coefficients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20 Ideal Solution Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20 Excess Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21 Property Changes of Mixing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21 Fundamental Property Relations Based on the Gibbs Energy. . . . . . . . 4-21 Fundamental Residual-Property Relation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21 Fundamental Excess-Property Relation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22 Models for the Excess Gibbs Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23 Behavior of Binary Liquid Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26 EQUILIBRIUM Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26 Phase Rule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27 Example 2: Application of the Phase Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27 Duhem’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27 Vapor/Liquid Equilibrium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28 Gamma/Phi Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28 Modified Raoult’s Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28 Example 3: Dew and Bubble Point Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29 4-1 Section 4 Thermodynamics Hendrick C. Van Ness, D.Eng. Howard P. Isermann Department of Chemical and Bio- logical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Fellow, American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Member, American Chemical Society (Section Coeditor) Michael M. Abbott, Ph.D. Deceased; Professor Emeritus, Howard P. Isermann Depart- ment of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Section Coeditor)* *Dr. Abbott died on May 31, 2006. This, his final contribution to the literature of chemical engineering, is deeply appreciated, as are his earlier contributions to the handbook. Copyright © 2008, 1997, 1984, 1973, 1963, 1950, 1941, 1934 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.

Data Reduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30 Solute/Solvent Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31 K Values, VLE, and Flash Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31 Example 4: Flash Calculation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-32 Equation-of-State Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-32 Extrapolation of Data with Temperature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-34 Example 5: VLE at Several Temperatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-34 Liquid/Liquid and Vapor/Liquid/Liquid Equilibria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-35 Chemical Reaction Stoichiometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-35 Chemical Reaction Equilibria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-35 Standard Property Changes of Reaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-35 Equilibrium Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-36 Example 6: Single-Reaction Equilibrium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37 Complex Chemical Reaction Equilibria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF PROCESSES Calculation of Ideal Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 Lost Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-39 Analysis of Steady-State Steady-Flow Proceses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-39 Example 7: Lost-Work Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-40 4-2 THERMODYNAMICS

A Molar (or unit-mass) J/mol [J/kg] Btu/lb mol Helmholtz energy [Btu/lbm] A Cross-sectional area in flow m2 ft2 âi Activity of species i Dimensionless Dimensionless in solution a⎯ i Partial parameter, cubic equation of state B 2d virial coefficient, cm3 /mol cm3 /mol density expansion B ⎯ i Partial molar second cm3 /mol cm3 /mol virial coefficient Bˆ Reduced second virial coefficient C 3d virial coefficient, density cm6 /mol2 cm6 /mol2 expansion Cˆ Reduced third virial coefficient D 4th virial coefficient, density cm9 /mol3 cm9 /mol3 expansion B′ 2d virial coefficient, pressure kPa−1 kPa−1 expansion C′ 3d virial coefficient, pressure kPa−2 kPa−2 expansion D′ 4th virial coefficient, kPa−3 kPa−3 pressure expansion Bij Interaction 2d virial cm3 /mol cm3 /mol coefficient Cijk Interaction 3d virial cm6 /mol2 cm6 /mol2 coefficient CP Heat capacity at constant J/(mol·K) Btu/(lb·mol·R) pressure CV Heat capacity at constant J/(mol·K) Btu/(lb·mol·R) volume fi Fugacity of pure species i kPa psi fˆi Fugacity of species i in solution kPa psi G Molar (or unit-mass) J/mol [J/kg] Btu/(lb·mol) Gibbs energy [Btu/lbm] g Acceleration of gravity m/s2 ft/s2 g ≡ GE /RT Dimensionless Dimensionless H Molar (or unit-mass) enthalpy J/mol [J/kg] Btu/(lb·mol) [Btu/lbm] Ki Equilibrium K value, yi /xi Dimensionless Dimensionless Kj Equilibrium constant for Dimensionless Dimensionless chemical reaction j k1 Henry’s constant for kPa psi solute species 1 M Molar or unit-mass solution property (A, G, H, S, U, V) M Mach number Dimensionless Dimensionless Mi Molar or unit-mass pure-species property (Ai, Gi, Hi, Si, Ui, Vi) M ⎯ i Partial property of species i in solution (A ⎯ i, G ⎯ i, H ⎯ i, S ⎯ i, U ⎯ i, V ⎯ i) MR Residual thermodynamic property (AR , GR , HR , SR , UR , VR ) ME Excess thermodynamic property (AE , GE , HE , SE , UE , VE ) M ⎯ i E Partial molar excess thermodynamic property ∆M Property change of mixing (∆A, ∆G, ∆H, ∆S, ∆U, ∆V) ∆M°j Standard property change of reaction j (∆Gj°, ∆Hj°, ∆CPj °) m Mass kg lbm m⋅ Mass flow rate kg/s lbm/s n Number of moles n⋅ Molar flow rate ni Number of moles of species i P Absolute pressure kPa psi Pi sat Saturation or vapor pressure kPa psi of species i Q Heat J Btu q Volumetric flow rate m3 /s ft3 /s Q ⋅ Rate of heat transfer J/s Btu/s R Universal gas constant J/(mol·K) Btu/(lb·mol·R) S Molar (or unit-mass) entropy J/(mol·K) Btu/(lb·mol·R) [J/(kg·K)] [Btu/(lbm·R)] S ⋅ G Rate of entropy generation, J/(K·s) Btu/(R·s) Eq. (4-151) T Absolute temperature K R Tc Critical temperature K R U Molar (or unit-mass) J/mol [J/kg] Btu/(lb·mol) internal energy [Btu/lbm] u Fluid velocity m/s ft/s V Molar (or unit-mass) volume m3 /mol [m3 /kg] ft3 /(lb·mol) [ft3 /lbm] W Work J Btu Ws Shaft work for flow process J Btu W ⋅ s Shaft power for flow process J/s Btu/s xi Mole fraction in general xi Mole fraction of species i in liquid phase yi Mole fraction of species i in vapor phase Z Compressibility factor Dimensionless Dimensionless z Elevation above a datum level m ft Superscripts E Denotes excess thermodynamic property id Denotes value for an ideal solution ig Denotes value for an ideal gas l Denotes liquid phase lv Denotes phase transition, liquid to vapor R Denotes residual thermodynamic property t Denotes total value of property v Denotes vapor phase ∞ Denotes value at infinite dilution Subscripts c Denotes value for the critical state cv Denotes the control volume fs Denotes flowing streams n Denotes the normal boiling point r Denotes a reduced value rev Denotes a reversible process Greek Letters α, β As superscripts, identify phases β Volume expansivity K−1 °R−1 εj Reaction coordinate for mol lb·mol reaction j Γi(T) Defined by Eq. (4-196) J/mol Btu/(lb·mol) γ Heat capacity ratio CP /CV Dimensionless Dimensionless γi Activity coefficient of species i Dimensionless Dimensionless in solution κ Isothermal compressibility kPa−1 psi−1 µi Chemical potential of species i J/mol Btu/(lb·mol) νi,j Stoichiometric number Dimensionless Dimensionless of species i in reaction j ρ Molar density mol/m3 lb·mol/ft3 σ As subscript, denotes a heat reservoir Φi Defined by Eq. (4-304) Dimensionless Dimensionless φi Fugacity coefficient of Dimensionless Dimensionless pure species i φˆ i Fugacity coefficient of Dimensionless Dimensionless species i in solution ω Acentric factor Dimensionless Dimensionless Nomenclature and Units Correlation- and application-specific symbols are not shown. U.S. Customary U.S. Customary Symbol Definition SI units System units Symbol Definition SI units System units THERMODYNAMICS 4-3

GENERAL REFERENCES: Abbott, M. M., and H. C. Van Ness, Schaum’s Out- line of Theory and Problems of Thermodynamics, 2d ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1989. Poling, B. E., J. M. Prausnitz, and J. P. O’Connell, The Properties of Gases and Liquids, 5th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2001. Prausnitz, J. M., R. N. Lichtenthaler, and E. G. de Azevedo, Molecular Thermodynamics of Fluid-Phase Equilibria, 3d ed., Prentice-Hall PTR, Upper Saddle River, N.J., 1999. Sandler, S. I., Chemical and Engineering Thermodynamics, 3d ed., Wiley, New York, 1999. Smith, J. M., H. C. Van Ness, and M. M. Abbott, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th ed., McGraw- Hill, New York, 2005. Tester, J. W., and M. Modell, Thermodynamics and Its Applications, 3d ed., Prentice-Hall PTR, Upper Saddle River, N.J., 1997. Van Ness, H. C., and M. M. Abbott, Classical Thermodynamics of Nonelectrolyte Solutions: With Applications to Phase Equilibria, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1982. INTRODUCTION Thermodynamics is the branch of science that lends substance to the principles of energy transformation in macroscopic systems. The gen- eral restrictions shown by experience to apply to all such transfor- mations are known as the laws of thermodynamics. These laws are primitive; they cannot be derived from anything more basic. The first law of thermodynamics states that energy is conserved, that although it can be altered in form and transferred from one place to another, the total quantity remains constant. Thus the first law of thermodynamics depends on the concept of energy, but conversely energy is an essential thermodynamic function because it allows the first law to be formulated. This coupling is characteristic of the primi- tive concepts of thermodynamics. The words system and surroundings are similarly coupled. A system can be an object, a quantity of matter, or a region of space, selected for study and set apart (mentally) from everything else, which is called the surroundings. An envelope, imagined to enclose the system and to separate it from its surroundings, is called the boundary of the system. Attributed to this boundary are special properties which may serve either to isolate the system from its surroundings or to provide for interaction in specific ways between the system and surroundings. An isolated system exchanges neither matter nor energy with its sur- roundings. If a system is not isolated, its boundaries may permit exchange of matter or energy or both with its surroundings. If the exchange of matter is allowed, the system is said to be open; if only energy and not matter may be exchanged, the system is closed (but not isolated), and its mass is constant. When a system is isolated, it cannot be affected by its surroundings. Nevertheless, changes may occur within the system that are detectable with measuring instruments such as thermometers and pressure gauges. However, such changes cannot continue indefinitely, and the system must eventually reach a final static condition of internal equilibrium. For a closed system which interacts with its surroundings, a final static condition may likewise be reached such that the system is not only internally at equilibrium but also in external equilibrium with its surroundings. The concept of equilibrium is central in thermodynamics, for asso- ciated with the condition of internal equilibrium is the concept of state. A system has an identifiable, reproducible state when all its properties, such as temperature T, pressure P, and molar volume V, are fixed. The concepts of state and property are again coupled. One can equally well say that the properties of a system are fixed by its state. Although the properties T, P, and V may be detected with mea- suring instruments, the existence of the primitive thermodynamic properties (see postulates 1 and 3 following) is recognized much more indirectly. The number of properties for which values must be speci- fied in order to fix the state of a system depends on the nature of the system, and is ultimately determined from experience. When a system is displaced from an equilibrium state, it undergoes a process, a change of state, which continues until its properties attain new equilibrium values. During such a process, the system may be caused to interact with its surroundings so as to interchange energy in the forms of heat and work and so to produce in the system changes considered desirable for one reason or another. A process that pro- ceeds so that the system is never displaced more than differentially from an equilibrium state is said to be reversible, because such a process can be reversed at any point by an infinitesimal change in external conditions, causing it to retrace the initial path in the opposite direction. Thermodynamics finds its origin in experience and experiment, from which are formulated a few postulates that form the foundation of the subject. The first two deal with energy. POSTULATE 1 There exists a form of energy, known as internal energy, which for systems at internal equilibrium is an intrinsic property of the system, functionally related to the measurable coordinates that characterize the system. POSTULATE 2 (FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS) The total energy of any system and its surroundings is conserved. Internal energy is quite distinct from such external forms as the kinetic and potential energies of macroscopic bodies. Although it is a macroscopic property, characterized by the macroscopic coordinates T and P, internal energy finds its origin in the kinetic and potential energies of molecules and submolecular particles. In applications of the first law of thermodynamics, all forms of energy must be consid- ered, including the internal energy. It is therefore clear that postulate 2 depends on postulate 1. For an isolated system the first law requires that its energy be constant. For a closed (but not isolated) system, the first law requires that energy changes of the system be exactly com- pensated by energy changes in the surroundings. For such systems energy is exchanged between a system and its surroundings in two forms: heat and work. Heat is energy crossing the system boundary under the influence of a temperature difference or gradient. A quantity of heat Q represents an amount of energy in transit between a system and its surroundings, and is not a property of the system. The convention with respect to sign makes numerical values of Q positive when heat is added to the system and negative when heat leaves the system. Work is again energy in transit between a system and its surround- ings, but resulting from the displacement of an external force acting on the system. Like heat, a quantity of work W represents an amount of energy, and is not a property of the system. The sign convention, analogous to that for heat, makes numerical values of W positive when work is done on the system by the surroundings and negative when work is done on the surroundings by the system. When applied to closed (constant-mass) systems in which only internal-energy changes occur, the first law of thermodynamics is expressed mathematically as dUt = dQ + dW (4-1) where Ut is the total internal energy of the system. Note that dQ and dW, differential quantities representing energy exchanges between the system and its surroundings, serve to account for the energy change of the surroundings. On the other hand, dUt is directly the differential change in internal energy of the system. Integration of Eq. (4-1) gives for a finite process ∆Ut = Q + W (4-2) where ∆Ut is the finite change given by the difference between the final and initial values of Ut . The heat Q and work W are finite quan- tities of heat and work; they are not properties of the system or func- tions of the thermodynamic coordinates that characterize the system. 4-4

POSTULATE 3 There exists a property called entropy, which for systems at internal equilibrium is an intrinsic property of the system, functionally related to the measurable coordinates that characterize the system. For reversible processes, changes in this property may be calculated by the equation dSt = ᎏ dQ T rev ᎏ (4-3) where St is the total entropy of the system and T is the absolute tem- perature of the system. POSTULATE 4 (SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS) The entropy change of any system and its surroundings, considered together, resulting from any real process is positive, approaching zero when the process approaches reversibility. In the same way that the first law of thermodynamics cannot be formulated without the prior recognition of internal energy as a prop- erty, so also the second law can have no complete and quantitative expression without a prior assertion of the existence of entropy as a property. The second law requires that the entropy of an isolated system either increase or, in the limit where the system has reached an equi- librium state, remain constant. For a closed (but not isolated) system it requires that any entropy decrease in either the system or its sur- roundings be more than compensated by an entropy increase in the other part, or that in the limit where the process is reversible, the total entropy of the system plus its surroundings be constant. The fundamental thermodynamic properties that arise in connection with the first and second laws of thermodynamics are internal energy and entropy. These properties together with the two laws for which they are essential apply to all types of systems. However, different types of systems are characterized by different sets of measurable coordinates or variables. The type of system most commonly encountered in chemical technology is one for which the primary characteristic variables are tem- perature T, pressure P, molar volume V, and composition, not all of which are necessarily independent. Such systems are usually made up of fluids (liquid or gas) and are called PVT systems. For closed systems of this kind the work of a reversible process may always be calculated from dWrev = −PdVt (4-4) where P is the absolute pressure and Vt is the total volume of the sys- tem. This equation follows directly from the definition of mechanical work. POSTULATE 5 The macroscopic properties of homogeneous PVT systems at internal equilibrium can be expressed as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition only. This postulate imposes an idealization, and is the basis for all subse- quent property relations for PVT systems. The PVT system serves as a satisfactory model in an enormous number of practical applications. In accepting this model one assumes that the effects of fields (e.g., electric, magnetic, or gravitational) are negligible and that surface and viscous shear effects are unimportant. Temperature, pressure, and composition are thermodynamic coor- dinates representing conditions imposed upon or exhibited by the sys- tem, and the functional dependence of the thermodynamic properties on these conditions is determined by experiment. This is quite direct for molar or specific volume V, which can be measured, and leads immediately to the conclusion that there exists an equation of state relating molar volume to temperature, pressure, and composition for any particular homogeneous PVT system. The equation of state is a primary tool in applications of thermodynamics. Postulate 5 affirms that the other molar or specific thermodynamic properties of PVT systems, such as internal energy U and entropy S, are also functions of temperature, pressure, and composition. These molar or unit-mass properties, represented by the plain symbols V, U, and S, are independent of system size and are called intensive. Tem- perature, pressure, and the composition variables, such as mole frac- tion, are also intensive. Total-system properties (Vt , Ut , St ) do depend on system size and are extensive. For a system containing n mol of fluid, Mt = nM, where M is a molar property. Applications of the thermodynamic postulates necessarily involve the abstract quantities of internal energy and entropy. The solution of any problem in applied thermodynamics is therefore found through these quantities. VARIABLES, DEFINITIONS, AND RELATIONSHIPS 4-5 Consider a single-phase closed system in which there are no chemical reactions. Under these restrictions the composition is fixed. If such a system undergoes a differential, reversible process, then by Eq. (4-1) dUt = dQrev + dWrev Substitution for dQrev and dWrev by Eqs. (4-3) and (4-4) gives dUt = TdSt − PdVt Although derived for a reversible process, this equation relates prop- erties only and is valid for any change between equilibrium states in a closed system. It is equally well written as d(nU) = T d(nS) − P d(nV) (4-5) where n is the number of moles of fluid in the system and is constant for the special case of a closed, nonreacting system. Note that n ϵ n1 + n2 + n3 + … = Αi ni where i is an index identifying the chemical species present. When U, S, and V represent specific (unit-mass) properties, n is replaced by m. Equation (4-5) shows that for a single-phase, nonreacting, closed system, nU = u(nS, nV). Then d(nU) = ΄ ΅nV,n d(nS) + ΄ ΅nS,n d(nV) ∂(nU) ᎏ ∂(nV) ∂(nU) ᎏ ∂(nS) VARIABLES, DEFINITIONS, AND RELATIONSHIPS where subscript n indicates that all mole numbers ni (and hence n) are held constant. Comparison with Eq. (4-5) shows that ΄ᎏ ∂ ∂ ( ( n n U S) ) ᎏ΅nV,n = T and ΄ᎏ ∂ ∂ ( ( n n U V) ) ᎏ΅nS,n = −P For an open single-phase system, we assume that nU = U (nS, nV, n1, n2, n3, . . .). In consequence, d(nU) = ΄ᎏ ∂ ∂ ( ( n n U S) ) ᎏ΅nV,n d(nS) + ΄ᎏ ∂ ∂ ( ( n n U V) ) ᎏ΅nS,n d(nV) + Αi ΄ᎏ ∂( ∂ n n U i ) ᎏ΅nS,nV,nj dni where the summation is over all species present in the system and subscript nj indicates that all mole numbers are held constant except the ith. Define µi ϵ ΄ᎏ ∂( ∂ n n U i ) ᎏ΅nS,nV,nj The expressions for T and −P of the preceding paragraph and the def- inition of µi allow replacement of the partial differential coefficients in the preceding equation by T, −P, and µi. The result is Eq. (4-6) of Table 4-1, where important equations of this section are collected. Equation (4-6) is the fundamental property relation for single-phase PVT systems, from which all other equations connecting properties of

4-6 THERMODYNAMICS TABLE 4-1 Mathematical Structure of Thermodynamic Property Relations For homogeneous systems of Primary thermodynamic functions Fundamental property relations constant composition Maxwell equations U = TS − PV + Αi xiµi (4-7) Hϵ U + PV (4-8) Aϵ U − TS (4-9) Gϵ H − TS (4-10) d(nU) = Td(nS) − Pd(nV) + Αi µi dni (4-6) d(nH) = Td(nS) + nVdP + Αi µi dni (4-11) d(nA) = − nSdT − Pd(nV) + Αi µi dni (4-12) d(nG) = − nSdT + nVdP + Αi µi dni (4-13) dU = TdS − PdV (4-14) dH = TdS + VdP (4-15) dA = −SdT − PdV (4-16) dG = −SdT + VdP (4-17) ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ V T ᎏ΃S = − ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ P S ᎏ΃V (4-18) ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ T P ᎏ΃S = ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ V S ᎏ΃P (4-19) ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ T P ᎏ΃V = ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ V S ᎏ΃T (4-20) ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ V T ᎏ΃P = − ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ P S ᎏ΃T (4-21) U, H, and S as functions of T and P or T and V Partial derivatives Total derivatives dH = ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ H T ᎏ΃P dT + ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ H P ᎏ΃T dP (4-22) dS = ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ T S ᎏ΃P dT + ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ P S ᎏ΃T dP (4-23) dU = ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ U T ᎏ΃V dT + ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ U V ᎏ΃T dV (4-24) dS = ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ T S ᎏ΃V dT + ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ V S ᎏ΃T dV (4-25) ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ H T ᎏ΃P = T ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ T S ᎏ΃P = CP (4-28) ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ H P ᎏ΃T = T ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ P S ᎏ΃T + V = V − T ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ V T ᎏ΃P (4-29) ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ U T ᎏ΃V = T ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ T S ᎏ΃V = CV (4-30) ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ U V ᎏ΃T = T ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ V S ᎏ΃T − P = T ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ T P ᎏ΃V − P (4-31) dH = CP dT + ΄V − T ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ V T ᎏ΃P ΅dP (4-32) dS = ᎏ C T P ᎏ dT − ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ V T ᎏ΃P dP (4-33) dU = CV dT + ΄T ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ T P ᎏ΃V − P ΅dV (4-34) dS = ᎏ C T V ᎏ dT + ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ T P ᎏ΃V dV (4-35) such systems are derived. The quantity µi is called the chemical poten- tial of species i, and it plays a vital role in the thermodynamics of phase and chemical equilibria. Additional property relations follow directly from Eq. (4-6). Because ni = xin, where xi is the mole fraction of species i, this equa- tion may be rewritten as d(nU) − Td(nS) + Pd(nV) − Αi µi d(xin) = 0 Expansion of the differentials and collection of like terms yield ΄dU − TdS + PdV − Αi µi dxi ΅n + ΄U − TS + PV − Αi xiµi ΅dn = 0 Because n and dn are independent and arbitrary, the terms in brackets must separately be zero. This provides two useful equations: dU = TdS − PdV + Αi µi dxi U = TS − PV + Αi xiµi The first is similar to Eq. (4-6). However, Eq. (4-6) applies to a sys- tem of n mol where n may vary. Here, however, n is unity and invari- ant. It is therefore subject to the constraints Αi xi = 1 and Αi dxi = 0. Mole fractions are not independent of one another, whereas the mole numbers in Eq. (4-6) are. The second of the preceding equations dictates the possible com- binations of terms that may be defined as additional primary func- tions. Those in common use are shown in Table 4-1 as Eqs. (4-7) through (4-10). Additional thermodynamic properties are related to these and arise by arbitrary definition. Multiplication of Eq. (4-8) of Table 4-1 by n and differentiation yield the general expression d(nH) = d(nU) + Pd(nV) + nVdP Substitution for d(nU) by Eq. (4-6) reduces this result to Eq. (4-11). The total differentials of nA and nG are obtained similarly and are expressed by Eqs. (4-12) and (4-13). These equations and Eq. (4-6) are equivalent forms of the fundamental property relation, and appear under that heading in Table 4-1. Each expresses a total property—nU, nH, nA, and nG—as a function of a particular set of independent variables, called the canonical variables for the property. The choice of which equation to use in a particular application is dictated by con- venience. However, the Gibbs energy G is special, because of its rela- tion to the canonical variables T, P, and {ni}, the variables of primary interest in chemical processing. Another set of equations results from the substitutions n = 1 and ni = xi. The resulting equations are of course less general than their parents. Moreover, because the mole fractions are not independent, mathematical operations requiring their independence are invalid. CONSTANT-COMPOSITION SYSTEMS For 1 mol of a homogeneous fluid of constant composition, Eqs. (4-6) and (4-11) through (4-13) simplify to Eqs. (4-14) through (4-17) of Table 4-1. Because these equations are exact differential expressions, application of the reciprocity relation for such expressions produces the common Maxwell relations as described in the subsection “Multi- variable Calculus Applied to Thermodynamics” in Sec. 3. These are Eqs. (4-18) through (4-21) of Table 4-1, in which the partial deriva- tives are taken with composition held constant. U, H, and S as Functions of T and P or T and V At constant composition, molar thermodynamic properties can be considered functions of T and P (postulate 5). Alternatively, because V is related to T and P through an equation of state, V can serve rather than P as the second independent variable. The useful equations for the total differentials of U, H, and S that result are given in Table 4-1 by Eqs. (4-22) through (4-25). The obvious next step is substitution for the partial differential coefficients in favor of measurable quantities. This purpose is served by definition of two heat capacities, one at constant pressure and the other at constant volume: CP ϵ ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ H T ᎏ΃P (4-26) CV ϵ ΂ᎏ ∂ ∂ U T ᎏ΃V (4-27) Both are properties of the material and functions of temperature, pressure, and composition. U ϵ Internal energy; H ϵ enthalpy; A ϵ Helmoholtz energy; G ϵ Gibbs energy.

Equation (4-15) of Table 4-1 may be divided by dT and restricted to constant P, yielding (∂H/∂T)P as given by the first equality of Eq. (4-28). Division of Eq. (4-15) by dP and restriction to constant T yield (∂H/∂P)T as given by the first equality of Eq. (4-29). Equation (4-28) is completed by Eq. (4-26), and Eq. (4-29) is completed by Eq. (4-21). Similarly, equations for (∂U/∂T)V and (∂U/∂V)T derive from Eq. (4-14), and these with Eqs. (4-27) and (4-20) yield Eqs. (4-30) and (4-31) of Table 4-1. Equations (4-22), (4-26), and (4-29) combine to yield Eq. (4-32); Eqs. (4-23), (4-28), and (4-21) to yield Eq. (4-33); Eqs. (4-24), (4-27), and (4-31) to yield Eq. (4-34); and Eqs. (4-25), (4-30), and (4-20) to yield Eq. (4-35). Equations (4-32) and (4-33) are general expressions for the enthalpy and entropy of homogeneous fluids at constant composition as func- tions of T and P. Equations (4-34) and (4-35) are general expressions for the internal energy and entropy of homogeneous fluids at constant composition as functions of temperature and molar volume. The coef- ficients of dT, dP, and dV are all composed of measurable quantities. The Ideal Gas Model An ideal gas is a model gas comprising imaginary molecules of zero volume that do not interact. Its PVT behavior is represented by the simplest of equations of state PVig = RT, where R is a universal constant, values of which are given in Table 1-9. The following partial derivatives, all taken at constant composition, are obtained from this equation: ΂ ΃V = = ΂ ΃P = = ΂ ΃T = − The first two of these relations when substituted appropriately into Eqs. (4-29) and (4-31) of Table 4-1 lead to very simple expressions for ideal gases: ΂ ΃T = ΂ ΃T = 0 ΂ ΃T = − ΂ ΃T = Moreover, Eqs. (4-32) through (4-35) become dHig = CP ig dT dSig = dT − dP dUig = CV ig dT dSig = dT + dV In these equations Vig , Uig , Cig V, Hig , CP ig , and Sig are ideal gas state values—the values that a PVT system would have were the ideal gas equation the true equation of state. They apply equally to pure species and to constant-composition mixtures, and they show that Uig , Cig V, Hig , and CP ig , are functions of temperature only, independent of P and V. The entropy, however, is a function of both T and P or of both T and V. Regardless of composition, the ideal gas volume is given by Vig = RT/P, and it provides the basis for comparison with true molar volumes through the compressibility factor Z. By definition, Z ϵ = = (4-36) The ideal gas state properties of mixtures are directly related to the ideal gas state properties of the constituent pure species. For those properties that are independent of P—Uig , Hig , C ig V , and C ig P —the mix- ture property is the sum of the properties of the pure constituent species, each weighted by its mole fraction: Mig = Αi yiMi ig (4-37) where Mig can represent any of the properties listed. For the entropy, which is a function of both T and P, an additional term is required to account for the difference in partial pressure of a species between its pure state and its state in a mixture: Sig = Αi yiSi ig − RΑi yi ln yi (4-38) PV ᎏ RT V ᎏ RTրP V ᎏ Vig R ᎏ Vig CV ig ᎏ T R ᎏ P CPP ig ᎏ T R ᎏ Vig ∂Sig ᎏ ∂V R ᎏ P ∂Sig ᎏ ∂P ∂Hig ᎏ ∂P ∂Uig ᎏ ∂V P ᎏ Vig ∂P ᎏ ∂V Vig ᎏ T R ᎏ P ∂Vig ᎏ ∂T P ᎏ T R ᎏ Vig ∂P ᎏ ∂T For the Gibbs energy, Gig = Hig − TSig ; whence by Eqs. (4-37) and (4-38): Gig = Αi yiGi ig + RTΑi yi ln yi (4-39) The ideal gas model may serve as a reasonable approximation to real- ity under conditions indicated by Fig. 4-1. Residual Properties The differences between true and ideal gas state properties are defined as residual properties MR : MR ϵ M − Mig (4-40) where M is the molar value of an extensive thermodynamic property of a fluid in its actual state and Mig is its corresponding ideal gas state value at the same T, P, and composition. Residual properties depend on interactions between molecules and not on characteristics of individual molecules. Because the ideal gas state presumes the absence of molecular interactions, residual properties reflect devia- tions from ideality. The most commonly used residual properties are as follows: Residual volume VR ϵ V − Vig Residual enthalpy HR ϵ H − Hig Residual entropy SR ϵ S − Sig Residual Gibbs energy GR ϵ G − Gig Useful relations connecting these residual properties derive from Eq. (4-17), an alternative form of which follows from the mathemati- cal identity: d ΂ ΃ϵ dG − dTG ᎏ RT2 1 ᎏ RT G ᎏ RT VARIABLES, DEFINITIONS, AND RELATIONSHIPS 4-7 FIG. 4-1 Region where Z lies between 0.98 and 1.02, and the ideal-gas equa- tion is a reasonable approximation. [Smith, Van Ness, and Abbott, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th ed., p. 104, McGraw-Hill, New York (2005).] 0 1 2 3 4 10 1 0.1 0.01 0.001 Pr Tr Z = 1.02 Z = 0.98

Substitution for dG by Eq. (4-17) and for G by Eq. (4-10) gives, after algebraic reduction, d΂ ΃= dP − dT (4-41) This equation may be written for the special case of an ideal gas and subtracted from Eq. (4-41) itself, yielding d ΂ ΃= dP − dT (4-42) As a consequence, = ΄ ΅T (4-43) and = −T ΄ ΅P (4-44) Equation (4-43) provides a direct link to PVT correlations through the compressibility factor Z as given by Eq. (4-36). Thus, with V = ZRT/P, VR ϵ V − Vig = − = (Z − 1) This equation in combination with a rearrangement of Eq. (4-43) yields d ΂ ΃= dP = (Z − 1) (constant T) Integration from P = 0 to arbitrary pressure P gives = ͵ P 0 (Z − 1) (constant T) (4-45) dP ᎏ P GR ᎏ RT dP ᎏ P VR ᎏ RT GR ᎏ RT RT ᎏ P RT ᎏ P ZRT ᎏ P ∂(GR րRT) ᎏᎏ ∂T HR ᎏ RT ∂(GR /RT) ᎏᎏ ∂P VR ᎏ RT HR ᎏ RT2 VR ᎏ RT GR ᎏ RT H ᎏ RT2 V ᎏ RT G ᎏ RT Smith, Van Ness, and Abbott [Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th ed., pp. 210–211, McGraw-Hill, New York (2005)] show that it is permissible here to set the lower limit of inte- gration (GR /RT)P=0 equal to zero. Note also that the integrand (Z − 1)/P remains finite as P → 0. Differentiation of Eq. (4-45) with respect to T in accord with Eq. (4-44) gives = −T͵ P 0 ΂ ΃P (constant T) (4-46) Because G = H − TS and Gig = Hig − TSig , then by difference, GR = HR − TSR , and = − (4-47) Equations (4-45) through (4-47) provide the basis for calculation of residual properties from PVT correlations. They may be put into gen- eralized form by substitution of the relationships P = PcPr T = TcTr dP = Pc dPr dT = Tc dTr The resulting equations are = ͵ Pr 0 (Z − 1) (4-48) = −Tr 2 ͵ Pr 0 ΂ ΃Pr (4-49) The terms on the right sides of these equations depend only on the upper limit Pr of the integrals and on the reduced temperature at which they are evaluated. Thus, values of GR /RT and HR /RTc may be determined once and for all at any reduced temperature and pressure from generalized compressibility factor data. dPr ᎏ Pr ∂Z ᎏ ∂Tr HR ᎏ RTc dPr ᎏ Pr GR ᎏ RT GR ᎏ RT HR ᎏ RT SR ᎏ R dP ᎏ P ∂Z ᎏ ∂T HR ᎏ RT 4-8 THERMODYNAMICS PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FOR GASES AND VAPORS The most satisfactory calculation procedure for the thermodynamic properties of gases and vapors is based on ideal gas state heat capaci- ties and residual properties. Of primary interest are the enthalpy and entropy; these are given by rearrangement of the residual property definitions: H = Hig + HR and S = Sig + SR These are simple sums of the ideal gas and residual properties, evalu- ated separately. EVALUATION OF ENTHALPY AND ENTROPY IN THE IDEAL GAS STATE For the ideal gas state at constant composition: dHig = CP ig dT and dSig = CP ig − R Integration from an initial ideal gas reference state at conditions T0 and P0 to the ideal gas state at T and P gives Hig = H0 ig + ͵ T T0 CP ig dT Sig = S0 ig + ͵ T T0 CP ig − R ln Substitution into the equations for H and S yields H = H0 ig + ͵ T T0 CP ig dT + HR (4-50) P ᎏ P0 dT ᎏ T dP ᎏ P dT ᎏ T S = S0 ig + ͵ T T0 CP ig − R ln + SR (4-51) The reference state at T0 and P0 is arbitrarily selected, and the values assigned to H0 ig and S0 ig are also arbitrary. In practice, only changes in H and S are of interest, and fixed reference state values ultimately can- cel in their calculation. The ideal gas state heat capacity Cig P is a function of T but not of P. For a mixture the heat capacity is simply the molar average ΑiyiCPi ig . Empirical equations relating C ig P to T are available for many pure gases; a common form is ᎏ C R ig P ᎏ = A + BT + CT2 + DT−2 (4-52) where A, B, C, and D are constants characteristic of the particular gas, and either C or D is zero. The ratio Cig P /R is dimensionless; thus the units of Cig P are those of R. Data for ideal gas state heat capacities are given for many substances in Table 2-155. Evaluation of the integrals ∫Cig P dT and ∫(Cig P /T)dT is accomplished by substitution for Cig P , followed by integration. For temperature limits of T0 and T and with τ ϵ T/T0, the equations that follow from Eq. (4-52) are ͵T T0 ᎏ C R ig P ᎏ dT = AT0(τ − 1) + T2 0(τ2 − 1) + T3 0 (τ3 − 1) + ΂ᎏ τ − τ 1 ᎏ΃ (4-53) ͵ T T0 ᎏ R C T ig P ᎏ dT = Alnτ + ΄BT0 + ΂CT2 0 + ΃΂ ΃΅(τ − 1) (4-54) τ + 1 ᎏ 2 D ᎏ τ2 T2 0 D ᎏ T0 C ᎏ 3 B ᎏ 2 P ᎏ P0 dT ᎏ T

Equations (4-50) and (4-51) may sometimes be advantageously expressed in alternative form through use of mean heat capacities: H = H0 ig + 〈CP ig 〉H(T − T0) + HR (4-55) S = S0 ig + 〈CP ig 〉S ln − Rln + SR (4-56) where 〈CP ig 〉H and 〈CP ig 〉S are mean heat capacities specific, respectively, for enthalpy and entropy calculations. They are given by the following equations: = A + T0(τ + 1) + T2 0(τ2 + τ + 1) + (4-57) = A + ΄BT0 + ΂CT2 0 + ΃΂ ΃΅ (4-58) RESIDUAL ENTHALPY AND ENTROPY FROM PVT CORRELATIONS The residual properties of gases and vapors depend on their PVT behavior. This is often expressed through correlations for the com- pressibility factor Z, defined by Eq. (4-36). Analytical expressions for Z as functions of T and P or T and V are known as equations of state. They may also be reformulated to give P as a function of T and V or V as a function of T and P. Virial Equations of State The virial equation in density is an infinite series expansion of the compressibility factor Z in powers of molar density ρ (or reciprocal molar volume V−1 ) about the real gas state at zero density (zero pressure): Z = 1 + Bρ + Cρ2 + Dρ3 + · · · (4-59) The density series virial coefficients B, C, D, . . . depend on tempera- ture and composition only. In practice, truncation is to two or three terms. The composition dependencies of B and C are given by the exact mixing rules B = Αi Αj yi yj Bij (4-60) C = Αi Αj Αk yi yj yk Cijk (4-61) where yi, yj, and yk are mole fractions for a gas mixture and i, j, and k identify species. The coefficient Bij characterizes a bimolecular interaction between molecules i and j, and therefore Bij = Bji. Two kinds of second virial coefficient arise: Bii and Bjj, wherein the subscripts are the same (i = j), and Bij, wherein they are different (i ≠ j ). The first is a virial coefficient for a pure species; the second is a mixture property, called a cross coef- ficient. Similarly for the third virial coefficients: Ciii, Cjjj, and Ckkk are for the pure species, and Ciij = Ciji = Cjii, . . . are cross coefficients. Although the virial equation itself is easily rationalized on empirical grounds, the mixing rules of Eqs. (4-60) and (4-61) follow rigorously from the methods of statistical mechanics. The temperature deriva- tives of B and C are given exactly by = Αi Αj yi yj (4-62) = Αi Αj Αk yi yj yk (4-63) An alternative form of the virial equation expresses Z as an expan- sion in powers of pressure about the real gas state at zero pressure (zero density): Z = 1 + B′P + C′P2 + D′P3 + . . . (4-64) Equation (4-64) is the virial equation in pressure, and B′, C′, D′, . . . are the pressure series virial coefficients. Again, truncation is to two dCijk ᎏ dT dC ᎏ dT dBij ᎏ dT dB ᎏ dT τ − 1 ᎏ ln τ τ + 1 ᎏ 2 D ᎏ τ2 T2 0 〈CP ig 〉S ᎏ R D ᎏ τT2 0 C ᎏ 3 B ᎏ 2 〈CP ig 〉H ᎏ R P ᎏ P0 T ᎏ T0 or three terms, with B′ and C′ depending on temperature and compo- sition only. Moreover, the two sets of coefficients are related: B′ = BրRT (4-65) C′ = (C − B2 )ր(RT)2 (4-66) Values can often be found for B, but not so often for C. Generalized correlations for both B and C are given by Meng, Duan, and Li [Fluid Phase Equilibria 226: 109–120 (2004)]. For pressures up to several bars, the two-term expansion in pres- sure, with B′ given by Eq. (4-65), is usually preferred: Z = 1 + B′P = 1 + BPրRT (4-67) For supercritical temperatures, it is satisfactory to ever higher pres- sures as the temperature increases. For pressures above the range where Eq. (4-67) is useful, but below the critical pressure, the virial expansion in density truncated to three terms is usually suitable: Z = 1 + Bρ + Cρ2 (4-68) Equations for residual enthalpy and entropy may be developed from each of these expressions. Consider first Eq. (4-67), which is explicit in volume. Equations (4-45) and (4-46) are therefore applicable. Direct substitution for Z in Eq. (4-45) gives ᎏ R G T R ᎏ = ᎏ R B T P ᎏ (4-69) Differentiation of Eq. (4-67) yields ΂ ΃P = ΂ − ΃ By Eq. (4-46), = ΂ − ΃ (4-70) and by Eq. (4-47), = − (4-71) An extensive set of three-parameter corresponding-states correla- tions has been developed by Pitzer and coworkers [Pitzer, Thermo- dynamics, 3d ed., App. 3, McGraw-Hill, New York (1995)]. Particularly useful is the one for the second virial coefficient. The basic equation is ᎏ R B T Pc c ᎏ = B0 + ωB1 (4-72) with the acentric factor defined by Eq. (2-17). For pure chemical species B0 and B1 are functions of reduced temperture only. Substitu- tion for B in Eq. (4-67) by this expression gives Z = 1 + (B0 + ωB1 )ᎏ T Pr r ᎏ (4-73) By differentiation, ΂ ΃Pr = Pr ΂ − ΃+ ωPr ΂ − ΃ Upon substitution of these equations into Eqs. (4-48) and (4-49), inte- gration yields = (B0 + ωB1 ) (4-74) = Pr ΄B0 − Tr + ω ΂B1 − Tr ΃΅ (4-75) The residual entropy follows from Eq. (4-47): = − Pr ΂ + ω ΃ (4-76) dB1 ᎏ dTr dB0 ᎏ dTr SR ᎏ R dB1 ᎏ dTr dB0 ᎏ dTr HR ᎏ RTc Pr ᎏ Tr GR ᎏ RT B1 ᎏ Tr 2 dB1 րdTr ᎏ Tr B0 ᎏ Tr 2 dB0 րdTr ᎏ Tr ∂Z ᎏ ∂Tr dB ᎏ dT P ᎏ R SR ᎏ R dB ᎏ dT B ᎏ T P ᎏ R HR ᎏ RT P ᎏ RT B ᎏ T dB ᎏ dT ∂Z ᎏ ∂T PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FOR GASES AND VAPORS 4-9

In these equations, B0 and B1 and their derivatives are well repre- sented by Abbott’s correlations [Smith and Van Ness, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 3d ed., p. 87, McGraw-Hill, New York (1975)]: B0 = 0.083 − (4-77) B1 = 0.139 − (4-78) = (4-79) = (4-80) Although limited to pressures where the two-term virial equation in pressure has approximate validity, these correlations are applicable for most chemical processing conditions. As with all generalized correla- tions, they are least accurate for polar and associating molecules. Although developed for pure materials, these correlations can be extended to gas or vapor mixtures. Basic to this extension are the mix- ing rules for the second virial coefficient and its temperature deriva- tive as given by Eqs. (4-60) and (4-62). Values for the cross coefficients Bij, with i ≠ j, and their derivatives are provided by Eq. (4-72) written in extended form: Bij = (B0 + ωij B1 ) (4-81) where B0 , B1 , dB0 /dTr, and dB1 /dTr are the same functions of Tr as given by Eqs. (4-77) through (4-80). Differentiation produces = ΂ + ωij ΃ = ΂ + ωij ΃ (4-82) where Trij = T/Tcij. The following combining rules for ωij, Tcij, and Pcij are given by Prausnitz, Lichtenthaler, and de Azevedo [Molecular Thermodynamics of Fluid-Phase Equilibria, 2d ed., pp. 132 and 162, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. (1986)]: ωij = (4-83) Tcij = (TciTcj)1ր2 (1 − kij) (4-84) Pcij = (4-85) with Zcij = (4-86) and Vcij = ΂ ΃ 3 (4-87) In Eq. (4-84), kij is an empirical interaction parameter specific to an i − j molecular pair. When i = j and for chemically similar species, kij = 0. Otherwise, it is a small (usually) positive number evaluated from minimal PVT data or, absence data, set equal to zero. When i = j, all equations reduce to the appropriate values for a pure species. When i ≠ j, these equations define a set of interaction para- meters without physical significance. For a mixture, values of Bij and dBij/dT from Eqs. (4-81) and (4-82) are substituted into Eqs. (4-60) and (4-62) to provide values of the mixture second virial coefficient Vci 1ր3 + Vcj 1ր3 ᎏᎏ 2 Zci + Zcj ᎏ 2 ZcijRTcij ᎏ Vcij ωi + ωj ᎏ 2 dB1 ᎏ dTrij dB0 ᎏ dTrij R ᎏ Pcij dBij ᎏ dT dB1 ᎏ dT dB0 ᎏ dT RTcij ᎏ Pcij dBij ᎏ dT RTcij ᎏ Pcij 0.722 ᎏ Tr 5.2 dB1 ᎏ dTr 0.675 ᎏ Tr 2.6 dB0 ᎏ dTr 0.172 ᎏ Tr 4.2 0.422 ᎏ Tr 1.6 B and its temperature derivative. Values of HR and SR are then given by Eqs. (4-70) and (4-71). A primary virtue of Abbott’s correlations for second virial coeffi- cients is simplicity. More complex correlations of somewhat wider applicability include those by Tsonopoulos [AIChE J. 20: 263–272 (1974); ibid., 21: 827–829 (1975); ibid., 24: 1112–1115 (1978); Adv. in Chemistry Series 182, pp. 143–162 (1979)] and Hayden and O’Con- nell [Ind. Eng. Chem. Proc. Des. Dev. 14: 209–216 (1975)]. For aque- ous systems see Bishop and O’Connell [Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 44: 630–633 (2005)]. Because Eq. (4-68) is explicit in P, it is incompatible with Eqs. (4-45) and (4-46), and they must be transformed to make V (or molar den- sity ρ) the variable of integration. The resulting equations are given by Smith, Van Ness, and Abbott [Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th ed., pp. 216–217, McGraw-Hill, New York (2005)]: ᎏ R G T R ᎏ = Z − 1 − ln Z + ͵ρ 0 (Z − 1)ᎏ d ρ ρ ᎏ (4-88) ᎏ R H T R ᎏ = Z − 1 − T͵ρ 0 ΂ ΃ρ ᎏ d ρ ρ ᎏ (4-89) By differentiation of Eq. (4-68), ΂ ΃ρ = ρ + ρ2 Substituting in Eqs. (4-88) and (4-89) for Z by Eq. (4-68) and in Eq. (4-89) for the derivative yields, upon integration and reduction, = 2Bρ + Cρ2 − lnZ (4-90) = ΂B − T ΃ρ + ΂C − ΃ρ2 (4-91) The residual entropy is given by Eq. (4-47). In a process calculation, T and P, rather than T and ρ (or T and V), are usually the favored independent variables. Applications of Eqs. (4-90) and (4-91) therefore require prior solution of Eq. (4-68) for Z or ρ. With Z = P/ρRT, Eq. (4-68) may be written in two equivalent forms: Z3 − Z2 − ΂ ΃Z − = 0 (4-92) ρ3 + ΂ ΃ρ2 + ΂ ΃ρ − = 0 (4-93) In the event that three real roots obtain for these equations, only the largest Z (smallest ρ), appropriate for the vapor phase, has physical significance, because the virial equations are suitable only for vapors and gases. Data for third virial coefficients are often lacking, but generalized correlations are available. Equation (4-68) may be rewritten in reduced form as Z = 1 + Bˆ + Cˆ ΂ ΃ 2 (4-94) where Bˆ is the reduced second virial coefficient given by Eq. (4-72). Thus by definition, Bˆ ϵ = B0 + ωB1 (4-95) The reduced third virial coefficient Cˆ is defined as Cˆ ϵ (4-96) A Pitzer-type correlation for Cˆ is then written as Cˆ = C0 + ωC1 (4-97) CPc 2 ᎏ R2 Tc 2 BPc ᎏ RTc Pr ᎏ Tr Z Pr ᎏ Tr Z P ᎏ CRT 1 ᎏ C B ᎏ C CP2 ᎏ (RT)2 BP ᎏ RT dC ᎏ dT T ᎏ 2 dB ᎏ dT HR ᎏ RT 3 ᎏ 2 GR ᎏ RT dC ᎏ dT dB ᎏ dT ∂Z ᎏ ∂T ∂Z ᎏ ∂T 4-10 THERMODYNAMICS

Correlations for C0 and C1 with reduced temperature are C0 = 0.01407 + − (4-98) C1 = − 0.02676 + − (4-99) The first is given by, and the second is inspired by, Orbey and Vera [AIChE J. 29: 107–113 (1983)]. Equation (4-94) is cubic in Z; with Tr and Pr specified, solution for Z is by iteration. An initial guess of Z = 1 on the right side usually leads to rapid convergence. Another class of equations, known as extended virial equations, was introduced by Benedict, Webb, and Rubin [J. Chem. Phys. 8: 334–345 (1940); 10: 747–758 (1942)]. This equation contains eight parameters, all functions of composition. It and its modifications, despite their complexity, find application in the petroleum and natural gas indus- tries for light hydrocarbons and a few other commonly encountered gases [see Lee and Kesler, AIChE J., 21: 510–527 (1975)]. Cubic Equations of State The modern development of cubic equations of state started in 1949 with publication of the Redlich- Kwong (RK) equation [Chem. Rev., 44: 233–244 (1949)], and many others have since been proposed. An extensive review is given by Valderrama [Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 42: 1603–1618 (2003)]. Of the equations published more recently, the two most popular are the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation, a modification of the RK equation [Chem. Eng. Sci. 27: 1197–1203 (1972)] and the Peng- Robinson (PR) equation [Ind. Eng. Chem. Fundam. 15: 59–64 (1976)]. All are encompased by a generic cubic equation of state, written as P = ᎏ V R − T b ᎏ − ᎏ (V + ⑀b a ) ( ( T V ) + σb) ᎏ (4-100) For a specific form of this equation, ⑀ and σ are pure numbers, the same for all substances, whereas parameters a(T) and b are substance- dependent. Suitable estimates of the parameters in cubic equations of state are usually found from values for the critical constants Tc and Pc. The procedure is discussed by Smith, Van Ness, and Abbott [Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th ed., pp. 93–94, McGraw-Hill, New York (2005)], and for Eq. (4-100) the appropriate equations are given as a(T) = ψ (4-101) b = Ω (4-102) Function α(Tr) is an empirical expression, specific to a particular form of the equation of state. In these equations ψ and Ω are pure num- bers, independent of substance and determined for a particular equa- tion of state from the values assigned to ⑀ and σ. As an equation cubic in V, Eq. (4-100) has three volume roots, of which two may be complex. Physically meaningful values of V are always real, positive, and greater than parameter b. When T > Tc, solu- tion for V at any positive value of P yields only one real positive root. When T = Tc, this is also true, except at the critical pressure, where three roots exist, all equal to Vc. For T < Tc, only one real positive (liq- uidlike) root exists at high pressures, but for a range of lower pressures there are three. Here, the middle root is of no significance; the small- est root is a liquid or liquidlike volume, and the largest root is a vapor or vaporlike volume. Equation (4-100) may be rearranged to facilitate its solution either for a vapor or vaporlike volume or for a liquid or liquidlike volume. Vapor: V = ᎏ R P T ᎏ + b − ᎏ (V + ⑀ V b) − (V b + σb) ᎏ (4-103a) Liquid: V = b + (V + ⑀b)(V + σb) ΄ ΅ (4-103b) RT − bP − VP ᎏᎏ a(T) a(T) ᎏ P RTc ᎏ Pc α(Tr)R2 Tc 2 ᎏᎏ Pc 0.00242 ᎏ Tr 10.5 0.05539 ᎏ Tr 2.7 0.00313 ᎏ Tr 10.5 0.02432 ᎏ Tr Solution for V is most convenient with the solve routine of a software package. An initial estimate for V in Eq. (4-103a) is the ideal gas value RT/P; for Eq. (4-103b) it is V = b. In either case, iteration is initiated by substituting the estimate on the right side. The resulting value of V on the left is returned to the right side, and the process continues until the change in V is suitably small. Equations for Z equivalent to Eqs. (4-103) are obtained by substi- tuting V = ZRT/P. Vapor: Z = 1 + β − qβ ᎏ (Z + ⑀ Z β) − (Z β + σβ) ᎏ (4-104a) Liquid: Z = β + (Z + ⑀b)(Z + σb) ΂ ΃ (4-104b) where by definition β ϵ (4-105) and q ϵ (4-106) These dimensionless quantities provide simplification, and when combined with Eqs. (4-101) and (4-102), they yield β = Ω (4-107) q = (4-108) In Eq. (4-104a) the initial estimate is Z = 1; in Eq. (4-104b) it is Z = β. Iteration follows the same pattern as for Eqs. (4-103). The final value of Z yields the volume root through V = ZRT/P. Equations of state, such as the Redlich-Kwong (RK) equation, which expresses Z as a function of Tr and Pr only, yield two-parameter corre- sponding-states correlations. The SRK equation and the PR equation, in which the acentric factor ω enters through function α(Tr; ω) as an additional parameter, yield three-parameter corresponding-states cor- relations. The numerical assignments for parameters ⑀, σ, Ω, and Ψ are given in Table 4-2. Expressions are also given for α(Tr; ω) for the SRK and PR equations. As shown by Smith, Van Ness, and Abbott [Introduction to Chemi- cal Engineering Thermodynamics, 7th ed., pp. 218–219, McGraw- Hill, New York (2005)], Eqs. (4-104) in conjunction with Eqs. (4-88), (4-89), and (4-47) lead to = Z − 1 − ln(Z − β) − qI (4-109) = Z − 1 + ΄ᎏ d d ln ln α T (T r r) ᎏ − 1 ΅ qI (4-110) HR ᎏ RT GR ᎏ RT Ψα(Tr) ᎏ ΩTr Pr ᎏ Tr a(T) ᎏ bRT bP ᎏ RT 1 + β − Z ᎏ qβ PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FOR GASES AND VAPORS 4-11 TABLE 4-2 Parameter Assignments for Cubic Equations of State* For use with Eqs. (4-104) through (4-106) Eq. of state α(Tr) σ ⑀ Ω Ψ RK (1949) Tr −1/2 1 0 0.08664 0.42748 SRK (1972) αSRK(Tr; ω)† 1 0 0.08664 0.42748 PR (1976) αPR(Tr; ω)‡ 1 + ͙2ෆ 1 − ͙2ෆ 0.07780 0.45724 *Smith, Van Ness, and Abbott, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Ther- modynamics, 7th ed., p. 98, McGraw-Hill, New York (2005). † αSRK(Tr; ω) = [1 + (0.480 + 1.574ω − 0.176ω2 ) (1 − Tr 1/2 )]2 ‡ αPR(Tr; ω) = [1 + (0.37464 + 1.54226ω − 0.26992ω2 ) (1 − Tr 1/2 )]2

= ln (Z − β) + ᎏ d d ln ln α( T T r r) ᎏ qI (4-111) where I = ln ΂ ΃ (4-112) Preliminary to application of these equations Z is found by solution of either Eq. (4-104a) or (4-104b). Cubic equations of state may be applied to mixtures through expres- sions that give the parameters as functions of composition. No estab- lished theory prescribes the form of this dependence, and empirical mixing rules are often used to relate mixture parameters to pure- species parameters. The simplest realistic expressions are a linear mix- ing rule for parameter b and a quadratic mixing rule for parameter a b = Αi xibi (4-113) a = Αi Αj xixjaij (4-114) with aij = aji. The aij are of two types: pure-species parameters (like subscripts) and interaction parameters (unlike subscripts). Parameter bi is for pure species i. The interaction parameter aij is often evaluated from pure-species parameters by a geometric mean combining rule aij = (aiaj)1/2 (4-115) These traditional equations yield mixture parameters solely from parameters for the pure constituent species. They are most likely to be satisfactory for mixtures comprised of simple and chemically similar molecules. Pitzer’s Generalized Correlations In addition to the corresponding-states coorelation for the second virial coefficient, Pitzer and coworkers [Thermodynamics, 3d ed., App. 3, McGraw- Hill, New York (1995)] developed a full set of generalized correla- tions. They have as their basis an equation for the compressibility factor, as given by Eq. (2-63): Z = Z0 + ωZ1 (2-63) where Z0 and Z1 are each functions of reduced temperature Tr and reduced pressure Pr. Acentric factor ω is defined by Eq. (2-17). Cor- relations for Z appear in Sec. 2. Generalized correlations are developed here for the residual enthalpy and residual entropy from Eqs. (4-48) and (4-49). Substitu- tion for Z by Eq. (2-63) puts Eq. (4-48) into generalized form: = ͵Pr 0 (Z0 − 1) + ω ͵Pr 0 Z1 (4-116) Differentiation of Eq. (2-63) yields ΂ ΃Pr = ΂ ΃Pr + ω ΂ ΃Pr Substitution for (∂Zր∂Tr)Pr in Eq. (4-49) gives = − Tr 2 ͵ Pr 0 ΂ ΃Pr − ωTr 2 ͵ Pr 0 ΂ ΃Pr (4-117) By Eq. (4-47), = ΂ ΃− Combination of Eqs. (4-116) and (4-117) leads to = − ͵ Pr 0 ΄Tr ΂ ΃Pr + Z0 − 1 ΅ − ω ͵ Pr 0 ΄Tr ΂ ΃Pr + Z1 ΅ If the first terms on the right sides of Eq. (4-117) and of this equation (including the minus signs) are represented by (HR )0 /RTc and (SR )0 /R and if the second terms, excluding ω but including the minus signs, are represented by (HR )1 /RTc and (SR )1 /R, then dPr ᎏ Pr ∂Z1 ᎏ ∂Tr dPr ᎏ Pr ∂Z0 ᎏ ∂Tr SR ᎏ R GR ᎏ RT HR ᎏ RTc 1 ᎏ Tr SR ᎏ R dPr ᎏ Pr ∂Z1 ᎏ ∂Tr dPr ᎏ Pr ∂Z0 ᎏ ∂Tr HR ᎏ RTc ∂Z1 ᎏ ∂Tr ∂Z0 ᎏ ∂Tr ∂Z ᎏ ∂Tr dPr ᎏ Pr dPr ᎏ Pr GR ᎏ RT Z + σβ ᎏ Z + ⑀β 1 ᎏ σ − ⑀ SR ᎏ R = + ω (4-118) = + ω (4-119) Pitzer’s original correlations for Z and the derived quantities were determined graphically and presented in tabular form. Since then, analytical refinements to the tables have been developed, with extended range and accuracy. The most popular Pitzer-type correlation is that of Lee and Kesler [AIChE J. 21: 510–527 (1975); see also Smith, Van Ness, and Abbott, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermody- namics, 5th, 6th, and 7th eds., App. E, McGraw-Hill, New York (1996, 2001, 2005)]. These tables cover both the liquid and gas phases and span the ranges 0.3 ≤ Tr ≤ 4.0 and 0.01 ≤ Pr ≤ 10.0. They list values of Z0 , Z1 , (HR )0 /RTc, (HR )1 /RTc, (SR )0 /R, and (SR )1 /R. Lee and Kesler a

Add a comment

Related pages

04 Thermodynamics - scribd.com

04 Thermodynamics - Free download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free.
Read more

Thermodynamics 3.6.04-01/15 Stirling engine - Uni Ulm

Thermodynamics Applied Thermodynamics 3.6.04-01/15 Stirling engine Principle: The Stirling engine is submitted to a load by means of an adjustable
Read more

04 Thermodynamics - YouTube

Rating is available when the video has been rented. Video provided by the University of Colorado Denver | Anschutz Medical Campus Visit our ...
Read more

Chem 131C. Lec. 04. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics ...

UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012)Lec 04. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- Entropy --View the complete course: http ...
Read more

Chapter 04 thermodynamics solution manual - Engineering

4-1 Solutions Manual for Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach Seventh Edition Yunus A. Cengel, Michael A. Boles McGraw-Hill, 2011 Chapter 4 ENERGY ...
Read more

Zeroth law of thermodynamics - Wikipedia

The zeroth law of thermodynamics states that if two thermodynamic systems are each in thermal equilibrium with a third, then they are in thermal ...
Read more

Laws of thermodynamics - Wikipedia

The laws of thermodynamics are important fundamental laws in physics and they are applicable in other natural sciences Zeroth law. The zeroth ...
Read more

MAK493E-04 Thermodynamics of combustion - ITU

1 Internal Combustion Engines – MAK 493E THERMODYNAMICS of COMBUSTION Prof.Dr. Cem Soruşbay Istanbul Technical University Internal Combustion Engines ...
Read more

Thermodynamics and Chemistry 2014

Thermodynamics and Chemistry Second Edition Version 5, May 2014 Howard DeVoe Associate Professor of Chemistry Emeritus University of Maryland, College Park ...
Read more

Mod-01 Lec-04 Thermodynamics of corrosion - YouTube

Environmental Degradation of Materials by Dr.Kallol Mondal,Department of Metallurgy and Material Science,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL ...
Read more